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Legislative News and Views - Rep. Steve Drazkowski (R)

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JUST SAY NO TO GOVERNOR DAYTON’S TAX AND SPEND APPROACH

Friday, February 03, 2017

Governor Dayton unveiled his budget recommendations recently. As expected, he not only wants to collect more of your money but spend it as well.

 

For the next two year budget cycle, the governor is proposing a $45.8 billion budget, which is roughly a ten percent increase over our current spending of $41.5 billion.

 

With a $1.4 billion over collection of the people’s money accumulating in St. Paul, Governor Dayton is also coming forward with huge tax increases that the people of Minnesota just can’t afford.

 

The governor would like a $1.4 billion tax increase on trips to the doctor by extending the provider tax, and $1.5 billion in new taxes and fees in the next biennium alone by increasing things such as the gas tax, tab fees, and new license surcharges.  

 

It’s mind blowing that with state budget reserves at all time high - $2 billion of the public’s money currently sits there for government’s economic security – our chief executive wants to increase government spending by ten percent and wants hardworking Minnesotans to contribute another $3 billion into the state coffers.

 

At the same time, median family incomes are below what they were in 2008. Minnesotans are battling to get ahead, dealing with college debt expenses, home mortgages, and ridiculous health insurance costs in the face of Obamacare and a failed MNsure program.

 

To review, Governor Dayton has now proposed to raise taxes in times of deficit, and twice asked to raise taxes in times of surplus. Truly, there is no time when he wouldn’t raise taxes in order to better fund the budget of an already bloated state government.

 

I thank the governor for sharing his preferred budget roadmap with us. However, he would take Minnesota in a direction that’s exactly the opposite of what the people voted for in November. It’s time for us to once again say no to an outlandish tax and spend approach.