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Legislative News and Views - Rep. Jeremy Munson (R)

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November 19th; Update from the Capitol

Tuesday, November 23, 2021

LEGISLATIVE UPDATE FROM

REP. JEREMY MUNSON - DISTRICT 23B

 

Friday, November 19, 2021 -- 

This week I sent a letter to Commissioner Malcolm responding to a threatening letter she sent to our school boards pushing mask mandates and vaccinating young children. Her letter cites false claims of 1 in 100 children being hospitalized. In her attached data sheet her own department reports show only a 1 in 229.05 chance of hospitalization, and federal numbers cite a risk of only 1 in more than 1,200 children are at risk. Our children have already lost a year of education, and the damage to our society won't be known for another 20 years. Enough is enough.

Governor Tries to Dictate to Legislature 

This week the Governor sent a letter ignorantly trying to spell out the conditions that will govern a potential special session. Among the many demands, he wants to require legislative leaders to block any amendments to his bills, saying that no topic should be voted on if it is too “controversial.” He even attempts to dictate when the special session will end.

Perhaps the Governor is in need of a constitutional refresher.

According to Article IV Section 12 of Minnesota’s Constitution, the governor can call a special session on “extraordinary occasions.” This special session allows the Minnesota Legislature to take up any issues that need to be addressed. However, the governor is not granted power to control what legislators do in special session, what is voted on, or when special session concludes. Those are all legislative roles constitutionally reserved for the Minnesota Legislature.

Essentially, the Governor can call us into special session, but his authority ends there. We get to write the bills however we want to, and Walz will have an opportunity to veto them if they pass. It’s the governor’s job to propose, but the legislators get to dispose. Walz seems to forget he is no longer a legislator.

If the Governor wants this special session so badly to pass his essential workers relief bill he can wait until january. If he calls a special session before January, we will not abide by any of his conditions, and his prearranged terms mean nothing. Minnesota’s legislators do not have an appetite to meet the demands that the Governor has handed down from on high. Instead, we are concerned with the peoples’ business; We need to stop Vaccine mandates for good, reform Chapter 12 emergency powers, and any other business the Legislature may decide to take up.

Social Study Standards Changes; Comment Period OPEN

The Department of Education has begun the statutory rulemaking process on the K-12 Academic Standards in Social Studies. The Request for Comments document was published in the State Register on Monday, November 15, 2021. You can view the proposed changes HERE 

A 60-day statutory public comment period will now take place in order to hear from the public. This comment period ends on January 14, 2022, at 4:30 p.m. Interested individuals can now submit written comments on the Proposed K-12 Academic Standards in Social Studies.

Comments must be submitted on the Office of Administrative Hearings e-comments website. If you need assistance with submitting a written comment you can find more information on how to submit a written comment on the Proposed K-12 Academic Standards in Social Studies rule language.

Interning at the Capitol

Internship Applications Open

With the 2022 regular session of the Minnesota Legislature fast approaching, the Minnesota House of Representatives has announced a new remote internship program for college students!

Offered exclusively to undergraduate students, this internship program will give students  an opportunity to engage in our legislative and political processes. Specifically, interns will work with legislators, assist staff, conduct research, virtually attend legislative meetings, and discuss public policy.

The internship will run throughout the duration of the regular session from January 31, 2022 to May 23, 2022. Additionally, interns will participate in weekly virtual meetings that examine public policy, current events, and pending legislation. These seminars will often include a featured speaker and will allow interns to discuss and debate the issues that public servants face every day.

In the application process, prospective interns will be able to indicate a preference to work with Republicans, Democrats, or nonpartisan staff. This will help the Minnesota House of Representatives assign interns to the appropriate legislators or departments. Interns will be required to work a minimum of 5 hours per week.

While the remote nature of this internship may be a disappointment to some, this will give students from our district a chance to participate in the legislative activities that occur in St. Paul. Furthermore, interns may be able to come down to the Minnesota State Capitol for a day or two to observe the legislative process in person.

The deadline to submit your application is December 3, 2021. I strongly encourage interested students to apply and join us at the Minnesota Legislature.

To apply for the internship program, or learn about it in greater detail, please click this link.

Interning at the Minnesota House of Representatives for an entire legislative session is a remarkable experience that will give students a detailed education on how our state government operates. I strongly encourage my constituents to apply. If you know any undergraduates who might be interested in this program, I encourage you to forward this information along.

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