Journal of the House - 60th Day - Monday, May 17, 2021 - Top of Page 7119

STATE OF MINNESOTA

 

Journal of the House

 

NINETY-SECOND SESSION - 2021

 

_____________________

 

SIXTIETH DAY

 

Saint Paul, Minnesota, Monday, May 17, 2021

 

 

      The House of Representatives convened at 10:00 a.m. and was called to order by Liz Olson, Speaker pro tempore.

 

      Prayer was offered by the Reverend Richard D. Buller, Valley Community Presbyterian Church, Golden Valley, Minnesota.

 

      The members of the House gave the pledge of allegiance to the flag of the United States of America.

 

      The roll was called and the following members were present:

 


Acomb

Agbaje

Akland

Albright

Anderson

Backer

Bahner

Bahr

Baker

Becker-Finn

Bennett

Berg

Bernardy

Bierman

Bliss

Boe

Boldon

Burkel

Carlson

Christensen

Daniels

Daudt

Davids

Davnie

Demuth

Dettmer

Drazkowski

Ecklund

Edelson

Elkins

Erickson

Feist

Fischer

Franke

Franson

Frazier

Frederick

Freiberg

Garofalo

Gomez

Green

Greenman

Grossell

Gruenhagen

Haley

Hamilton

Hansen, R.

Hanson, J.

Hassan

Hausman

Heinrich

Heintzeman

Her

Hertaus

Hollins

Hornstein

Howard

Huot

Igo

Johnson

Jordan

Jurgens

Keeler

Kiel

Klevorn

Koegel

Kotyza-Witthuhn

Koznick

Kresha

Lee

Liebling

Lillie

Lippert

Lislegard

Long

Lucero

Lueck

Mariani

Marquart

Masin

McDonald

Mekeland

Miller

Moller

Moran

Morrison

Mortensen

Mueller

Munson

Murphy

Nash

Nelson, M.

Nelson, N.

Neu Brindley

Noor

Novotny

O'Driscoll

Olson, B.

Olson, L.

O'Neill

Pelowski

Petersburg

Pfarr

Pierson

Pinto

Poston

Pryor

Quam

Raleigh

Rasmusson

Reyer

Richardson

Robbins

Sandell

Sandstede

Schomacker

Schultz

Scott

Stephenson

Sundin

Swedzinski

Theis

Thompson

Torkelson

Urdahl

Vang

Wazlawik

West

Winkler

Wolgamott

Xiong, J.

Xiong, T.

Youakim

Spk. Hortman


 

      A quorum was present.

 

      The Chief Clerk proceeded to read the Journals of the preceding days.  There being no objection, further reading of the Journals was dispensed with and the Journals were approved as corrected by the Chief Clerk.


Journal of the House - 60th Day - Monday, May 17, 2021 - Top of Page 7120

INTRODUCTION AND FIRST READING OF HOUSE BILLS

 

 

      The following House Files were introduced:

 

 

Agbaje introduced:

 

H. F. No. 2649, A bill for an act relating to capital investment; appropriating money for phase I of the North Commons Improvement Project in the city of Minneapolis.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Capital Investment.

 

 

Jordan and Olson, L., introduced:

 

H. F. No. 2650, A bill for an act relating to environment; establishing a residential lead service line replacement grant program; appropriating money; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 446A.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Environment and Natural Resources Finance and Policy.

 

 

Agbaje introduced:

 

H. F. No. 2651, A bill for an act relating to capital investment; appropriating money for expansion of the Central City Storm Tunnel in the city of Minneapolis; authorizing the sale and issuance of state bonds.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Capital Investment.

 

 

West introduced:

 

H. F. No. 2652, A bill for an act relating to public safety; modifying definition of small amount of marijuana; modifying possession of small amounts of marijuana law; prohibiting weight of fluids used in water pipes from being used to determine weight of marijuana mixtures; authorizing expungement of records in certain instances; ending driver's license revocations for persons who commit low-level marijuana offenses; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, sections 152.01, subdivisions 9a, 16, 18, by adding subdivisions; 152.021, subdivision 2; 152.022, subdivision 2; 152.023, subdivision 2; 152.025, subdivision 4; 152.027, subdivision 4; 152.0271; 152.096, subdivision 1; 152.18, subdivision 3; 260B.198, subdivision 1; 609.165, subdivisions 1a, 1b; 609A.02, by adding a subdivision; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapters 152; 609A.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Public Safety and Criminal Justice Reform Finance and Policy.

 

 

Kotyza-Witthuhn introduced:

 

H. F. No. 2653, A bill for an act relating to insurance; establishing a peer-to-peer car sharing program; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, sections 65B.49, subdivision 5a; 72A.125, subdivision 1; 297A.64, subdivision 4; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 65B.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Commerce Finance and Policy.


Journal of the House - 60th Day - Monday, May 17, 2021 - Top of Page 7121

           Winkler moved that the House recess subject to the call of the Chair.  The motion prevailed.

 

 

RECESS

 

 

RECONVENED

 

      The House reconvened and was called to order by the Speaker.

 

 

      Petersburg was excused between the hours of 12:30 p.m. and 12:50 p.m.

 

 

CALENDAR FOR THE DAY

 

 

      S. F. No. 519, A bill for an act relating to corrections; requiring that certain information, assistance, services, and medications be provided to inmates upon release from prison; providing identification cards for released inmates; requiring a homelessness mitigation plan and annual reporting on information relating to homelessness; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 171.06, subdivision 3; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 241.

 

 

      The bill was read for the third time and placed upon its final passage.

 

      The question was taken on the passage of the bill and the roll was called.  There were 124 yeas and 7 nays as follows:

 

      Those who voted in the affirmative were:

 


Acomb

Agbaje

Akland

Albright

Anderson

Backer

Bahner

Bahr

Baker

Becker-Finn

Bennett

Berg

Bernardy

Bierman

Bliss

Boe

Boldon

Burkel

Carlson

Christensen

Daniels

Daudt

Davids

Davnie

Demuth

Dettmer

Ecklund

Edelson

Elkins

Erickson

Feist

Fischer

Franke

Franson

Frazier

Frederick

Freiberg

Garofalo

Gomez

Greenman

Gruenhagen

Haley

Hamilton

Hansen, R.

Hanson, J.

Hassan

Hausman

Heinrich

Heintzeman

Her

Hertaus

Hollins

Hornstein

Howard

Huot

Igo

Johnson

Jordan

Jurgens

Keeler

Kiel

Klevorn

Koegel

Kotyza-Witthuhn

Koznick

Kresha

Lee

Liebling

Lillie

Lippert

Lislegard

Long

Lueck

Mariani

Marquart

Masin

Miller

Moller

Moran

Morrison

Mueller

Murphy

Nash

Nelson, M.

Nelson, N.

Neu Brindley

Noor

Novotny

O'Driscoll

Olson, B.

Olson, L.

O'Neill

Pelowski

Pfarr

Pierson

Pinto

Poston

Pryor

Quam

Raleigh

Rasmusson

Reyer

Richardson

Robbins

Sandell

Sandstede

Schomacker

Schultz

Scott

Stephenson

Sundin

Swedzinski

Theis

Torkelson

Urdahl

Vang

Wazlawik

West

Winkler

Wolgamott

Xiong, J.

Xiong, T.

Youakim

Spk. Hortman


 


Journal of the House - 60th Day - Monday, May 17, 2021 - Top of Page 7122

           Those who voted in the negative were:

 


Drazkowski

Green

Grossell

Lucero

Mekeland

Mortensen

Munson


 

 

      The bill was passed and its title agreed to.

 

 

      The following Conference Committee Report was received:

 

 

CONFERENCE COMMITTEE REPORT ON H. F. No. 2128

 

A bill for an act relating to state government; modifying provisions governing health, health care, human services, human services licensing and background studies, health-related licensing boards, prescription drugs, health insurance, telehealth, children and family services, behavioral health, direct care and treatment, disability services and continuing care for older adults, community supports, and chemical and mental health services; establishing a budget for health and human services; making forecast adjustments; making technical and conforming changes; requiring reports; transferring money; appropriating money; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, sections 16A.151, subdivision 2; 62A.04, subdivision 2; 62A.10, by adding a subdivision; 62A.15, subdivision 4, by adding a subdivision; 62A.152, subdivision 3; 62A.3094, subdivision 1; 62A.65, subdivision 1, by adding a subdivision; 62C.01, by adding a subdivision; 62D.01, by adding a subdivision; 62D.095, subdivisions 2, 3, 4, 5; 62J.495, subdivisions 1, 2, 3, 4; 62J.497, subdivisions 1, 3; 62J.498; 62J.4981; 62J.4982; 62J.63, subdivisions 1, 2; 62Q.01, subdivision 2a; 62Q.02; 62Q.096; 62Q.46; 62Q.677, by adding a subdivision; 62Q.81; 62U.04, subdivisions 4, 5, 11; 62V.05, by adding a subdivision; 62W.11; 103H.201, subdivision 1; 119B.011, subdivision 15; 119B.025, subdivision 4; 119B.03, subdivisions 4, 6; 119B.09, subdivision 4; 119B.11, subdivision 2a; 119B.125, subdivision 1; 119B.13, subdivisions 1, 1a, 6, 7; 119B.25, subdivision 3; 122A.18, subdivision 8; 136A.128, subdivisions 2, 4; 144.0724, subdivisions 1, 2, 3a, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 12; 144.1205, subdivisions 2, 4, 8, 9, by adding a subdivision; 144.125, subdivision 1; 144.1481, subdivision 1; 144.1501, subdivisions 1, 2, 3; 144.1911, subdivision 6; 144.212, by adding a subdivision; 144.225, subdivisions 2, 7; 144.226, by adding subdivisions; 144.55, subdivisions 4, 6; 144.551, subdivision 1, by adding a subdivision; 144.555; 144.651, subdivision 2; 144.9501, subdivision 17; 144.9502, subdivision 3; 144.9504, subdivisions 2, 5; 144D.01, subdivision 4; 144G.08, subdivision 7, as amended; 144G.54, subdivision 3; 144G.84; 145.893, subdivision 1; 145.894; 145.897; 145.899; 145.901, subdivisions 2, 4; 147.033; 148.90, subdivision 2; 148.911; 148B.30, subdivision 1; 148B.31; 148B.51; 148B.5301, subdivision 2; 148B.54, subdivision 2; 148E.010, by adding a subdivision; 148E.120, subdivision 2; 148E.130, subdivision 1, by adding a subdivision; 148F.11, subdivision 1; 151.01, by adding subdivisions; 151.071, subdivisions 1, 2; 151.37, subdivision 2; 151.555, subdivisions 1, 7, 11, by adding a subdivision; 152.01, subdivision 23; 152.02, subdivisions 2, 3; 152.11, subdivision 1a, by adding a subdivision; 152.12, by adding a subdivision; 152.125, subdivision 3; 152.22, subdivisions 6, 11, by adding subdivisions; 152.23; 152.25, by adding a subdivision; 152.26; 152.27, subdivisions 3, 4, 6; 152.28, subdivision 1; 152.29, subdivisions 1, 3, by adding subdivisions; 152.31; 152.32, subdivision 3; 156.12, subdivision 2; 171.07, by adding a subdivision; 174.30, subdivision 3; 245.462, subdivisions 1, 6, 8, 9, 14, 16, 17, 18, 21, 23, by adding a subdivision; 245.4661, subdivision 5; 245.4662, subdivision 1; 245.467, subdivisions 2, 3; 245.469, subdivisions 1, 2; 245.470, subdivision 1; 245.4712, subdivision 2; 245.472, subdivision 2; 245.4863; 245.4871, subdivisions 9a, 10, 11a, 17, 21, 26, 27, 29, 31, 32, 34, by adding a subdivision; 245.4876, subdivisions 2, 3; 245.4879, subdivision 1; 245.488, subdivision 1; 245.4882, subdivisions 1, 3; 245.4885, subdivision 1; 245.4889, subdivision 1; 245.4901, subdivision 2; 245.62, subdivision 2; 245.735, subdivisions 3, 5, by adding a subdivision; 245A.02, by adding subdivisions; 245A.03, subdivision 7; 245A.04, subdivision 5; 245A.041, by adding a subdivision; 245A.043, subdivision 3; 245A.05; 245A.07, subdivision 1; 245A.10, subdivision 4; 245A.14, subdivision 4; 245A.16, by adding a subdivision; 245A.50, subdivisions 7, 9; 245A.65, subdivision 2; 245C.02, subdivisions 4a, 5, by adding subdivisions; 245C.03; 245C.05, subdivisions 1, 2, 2a, 2b, 2c, 2d, 4; 245C.08, subdivision 3, by adding a subdivision; 245C.10, subdivision 15, by adding subdivisions; 245C.13, subdivision 2;


Journal of the House - 60th Day - Monday, May 17, 2021 - Top of Page 7123

245C.14, subdivision 1, by adding a subdivision; 245C.15, by adding a subdivision; 245C.16, subdivisions 1, 2; 245C.17, subdivision 1, by adding a subdivision; 245C.18; 245C.24, subdivisions 2, 3, 4, by adding a subdivision; 245C.32, subdivision 1a; 245D.02, subdivision 20; 245F.04, subdivision 2; 245G.01, subdivisions 13, 26; 245G.03, subdivision 2; 245G.06, subdivision 1; 246.54, subdivision 1b; 254A.19, subdivision 5; 254B.01, subdivision 4a, by adding a subdivision; 254B.05, subdivision 5; 254B.12, by adding a subdivision; 256.01, subdivisions 14b, 28; 256.0112, subdivision 6; 256.041; 256.042, subdivisions 2, 4; 256.043, subdivision 3; 256.969, subdivisions 2b, 9, by adding a subdivision; 256.9695, subdivision 1; 256.9741, subdivision 1; 256.98, subdivision 1; 256.983; 256B.04, subdivisions 12, 14; 256B.055, subdivision 6; 256B.056, subdivision 10; 256B.057, subdivision 3; 256B.06, subdivision 4; 256B.0615, subdivisions 1, 5; 256B.0616, subdivisions 1, 3, 5; 256B.0621, subdivision 10; 256B.0622, subdivisions 1, 2, 3a, 4, 7, 7a, 7b, 7d; 256B.0623, subdivisions 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 9, 12; 256B.0624; 256B.0625, subdivisions 3b, 3c, 3d, 3e, 5, 5m, 9, 10, 13, 13c, 13d, 13e, 13h, 17, 17b, 18, 18b, 19c, 20, 20b, 28a, 30, 31, 42, 46, 48, 49, 52, 56a, 58, by adding subdivisions; 256B.0631, subdivision 1; 256B.0638, subdivisions 3, 5, 6; 256B.0659, subdivisions 13, 21, 24, by adding subdivisions; 256B.0757, subdivision 4c; 256B.0759, subdivisions 2, 4, by adding subdivisions; 256B.0911, subdivisions 1a, 3a, 3f, 4d; 256B.092, subdivisions 4, 5, 12; 256B.0924, subdivision 6; 256B.094, subdivision 6; 256B.0941, subdivision 1; 256B.0943, subdivisions 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 5a, 6, 7, 9, 11; 256B.0946, subdivisions 1, 1a, 2, 3, 4, 6; 256B.0947, subdivisions 1, 2, 3, 3a, 5, 6, 7; 256B.0949, subdivisions 2, 4, 5a, by adding a subdivision; 256B.097, by adding subdivisions; 256B.196, subdivision 2; 256B.25, subdivision 3; 256B.439, by adding subdivisions; 256B.49, subdivisions 11, 11a, 14, 17, by adding a subdivision; 256B.4914, subdivisions 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, by adding a subdivision; 256B.69, subdivisions 5a, 6, 6d, by adding subdivisions; 256B.6928, subdivision 5; 256B.75; 256B.76, subdivisions 2, 4; 256B.761; 256B.763; 256B.79, subdivisions 1, 3; 256B.85, subdivisions 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 11b, 12, 12b, 13, 13a, 15, 17a, 18a, 20b, 23, 23a, by adding subdivisions; 256D.03, by adding a subdivision; 256D.051, by adding subdivisions; 256D.0515; 256D.0516, subdivision 2; 256E.34, subdivision 1; 256I.03, subdivision 13; 256I.04, subdivision 3; 256I.05, subdivisions 1a, 1c, 11; 256I.06, subdivisions 6, 8; 256J.08, subdivisions 15, 71, 79; 256J.09, subdivision 3; 256J.10; 256J.21, subdivisions 3, 4, 5; 256J.24, subdivision 5; 256J.30, subdivision 8; 256J.33, subdivisions 1, 2, 4; 256J.37, subdivisions 1, 1b, 3, 3a; 256J.45, subdivision 1; 256J.626, subdivision 1; 256J.95, subdivision 9; 256L.01, subdivision 5; 256L.03, subdivision 5; 256L.04, subdivision 7b; 256L.05, subdivision 3a; 256L.07, subdivision 2; 256L.11, subdivisions 6a, 7; 256L.15, subdivision 2; 256N.25, subdivisions 2, 3; 256N.26, subdivisions 11, 13; 256P.01, subdivisions 3, 6a, by adding a subdivision; 256P.04, subdivisions 4, 8; 256P.06, subdivisions 2, 3; 256P.07; 256S.05, subdivision 2; 256S.18, subdivision 7; 256S.20, subdivision 1; 257.0755, subdivision 1; 257.076, subdivisions 3, 5; 257.0768, subdivisions 1, 6; 257.0769; 260.761, subdivision 2; 260C.007, subdivisions 6, 14, 26c, 31; 260C.157, subdivision 3; 260C.212, subdivisions 1a, 13; 260C.215, subdivision 4; 260C.4412; 260C.452; 260C.704; 260C.706; 260C.708; 260C.71; 260C.712; 260C.714; 260D.01; 260D.05; 260D.06, subdivision 2; 260D.07; 260D.08; 260D.14; 260E.01; 260E.02, subdivision 1; 260E.03, subdivision 22, by adding subdivisions; 260E.06, subdivision 1; 260E.14, subdivisions 2, 5; 260E.17, subdivision 1; 260E.18; 260E.20, subdivision 2; 260E.24, subdivisions 2, 7; 260E.31, subdivision 1; 260E.33, subdivision 1, by adding a subdivision; 260E.35, subdivision 6; 260E.36, by adding a subdivision; 295.50, subdivision 9b; 295.53, subdivision 1; 325F.721, subdivision 1; 326.71, subdivision 4; 326.75, subdivisions 1, 2, 3; Laws 2019, First Special Session chapter 9, article 14, section 3, as amended; Laws 2020, First Special Session chapter 7, section 1, subdivision 2, as amended; Laws 2020, Seventh Special Session chapter 1, article 6, section 12, subdivision 4; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapters 3; 62A; 62J; 62Q; 62W; 119B; 144; 145; 151; 245; 245A; 245C; 254B; 256; 256B; 256P; 256S; proposing coding for new law as Minnesota Statutes, chapter 245I; repealing Minnesota Statutes 2020, sections 16A.724, subdivision 2; 62A.67; 62A.671; 62A.672; 62J.63, subdivision 3; 119B.125, subdivision 5; 144.0721, subdivision 1; 144.0722; 144.0724, subdivision 10; 144.693; 245.462, subdivision 4a; 245.4871, subdivision 32a; 245.4879, subdivision 2; 245.62, subdivisions 3, 4; 245.69, subdivision 2; 245.735, subdivisions 1, 2, 4; 245C.10, subdivisions 2, 2a, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 9a, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 16; 256B.0596; 256B.0615, subdivision 2; 256B.0616, subdivision 2; 256B.0622, subdivisions 3, 5a; 256B.0623, subdivisions 7, 8, 10, 11; 256B.0625, subdivisions 5l, 18c, 18d, 18e, 18h, 35a, 35b, 61, 62, 65; 256B.0916, subdivisions 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 11, 12; 256B.0924, subdivision 4a; 256B.0943, subdivisions 8, 10; 256B.0944; 256B.0946, subdivision 5; 256B.097, subdivisions 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6; 256B.49, subdivisions 26, 27; 256D.051, subdivisions 1, 1a, 2, 2a, 3, 3a, 3b, 6b, 6c, 7, 8, 9, 18; 256D.052, subdivision 3; 256J.08, subdivisions 10, 53, 61, 62, 81, 83; 256J.21, subdivisions 1, 2; 256J.30, subdivisions 5, 7, 8; 256J.33, subdivisions 3, 4, 5; 256J.34,


Journal of the House - 60th Day - Monday, May 17, 2021 - Top of Page 7124

subdivisions 1, 2, 3, 4; 256J.37, subdivision 10; 256S.20, subdivision 2; Minnesota Rules, parts 9505.0275; 9505.0370; 9505.0371; 9505.0372; 9505.1693; 9505.1696, subparts 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22; 9505.1699; 9505.1701; 9505.1703; 9505.1706; 9505.1712; 9505.1715; 9505.1718; 9505.1724; 9505.1727; 9505.1730; 9505.1733; 9505.1736; 9505.1739; 9505.1742; 9505.1745; 9505.1748; 9520.0010; 9520.0020; 9520.0030; 9520.0040; 9520.0050; 9520.0060; 9520.0070; 9520.0080; 9520.0090; 9520.0100; 9520.0110; 9520.0120; 9520.0130; 9520.0140; 9520.0150; 9520.0160; 9520.0170; 9520.0180; 9520.0190; 9520.0200; 9520.0210; 9520.0230; 9520.0750; 9520.0760; 9520.0770; 9520.0780; 9520.0790; 9520.0800; 9520.0810; 9520.0820; 9520.0830; 9520.0840; 9520.0850; 9520.0860; 9520.0870; 9530.6800; 9530.6810.

 

May 16, 2021

The Honorable Melissa Hortman

Speaker of the House of Representatives

 

The Honorable Jeremy R. Miller

President of the Senate

 

We, the undersigned conferees for H. F. No. 2128 report that we have agreed upon the items in dispute and recommend as follows:

 

That the Senate recede from its amendments and that H. F. No. 2128 be further amended as follows:

 

Delete everything after the enacting clause and insert:

 

"ARTICLE 1

DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH CARE PROGRAMS

 

Section 1.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 256.01, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

 

Subd. 42.  Expiration of report mandates.  (a) If the submission of a report by the commissioner of human services to the legislature is mandated by statute and the enabling legislation does not include a date for the submission of a final report, the mandate to submit the report shall expire in accordance with this section.

 

(b) If the mandate requires the submission of an annual report and the mandate was enacted before January 1, 2021, the mandate shall expire on January 1, 2023.  If the mandate requires the submission of a biennial or less frequent report and the mandate was enacted before January 1, 2021, the mandate shall expire on January 1, 2024.

 

(c) Any reporting mandate enacted on or after January 1, 2021, shall expire three years after the date of enactment if the mandate requires the submission of an annual report and shall expire five years after the date of enactment if the mandate requires the submission of a biennial or less frequent report unless the enacting legislation provides for a different expiration date.

 

(d) The commissioner shall submit a list to the chairs and ranking minority members of the legislative committee with jurisdiction over human services by February 15 of each year, beginning February 15, 2022, of all reports set to expire during the following calendar year in accordance with this section.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective the day following final enactment.

 

Sec. 2.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 256.969, subdivision 2b, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 2b.  Hospital payment rates.  (a) For discharges occurring on or after November 1, 2014, hospital inpatient services for hospitals located in Minnesota shall be paid according to the following:


Journal of the House - 60th Day - Monday, May 17, 2021 - Top of Page 7125

(1) critical access hospitals as defined by Medicare shall be paid using a cost-based methodology;

 

(2) long-term hospitals as defined by Medicare shall be paid on a per diem methodology under subdivision 25;

 

(3) rehabilitation hospitals or units of hospitals that are recognized as rehabilitation distinct parts as defined by Medicare shall be paid according to the methodology under subdivision 12; and

 

(4) all other hospitals shall be paid on a diagnosis-related group (DRG) methodology.

 

(b) For the period beginning January 1, 2011, through October 31, 2014, rates shall not be rebased, except that a Minnesota long-term hospital shall be rebased effective January 1, 2011, based on its most recent Medicare cost report ending on or before September 1, 2008, with the provisions under subdivisions 9 and 23, based on the rates in effect on December 31, 2010.  For rate setting periods after November 1, 2014, in which the base years are updated, a Minnesota long-term hospital's base year shall remain within the same period as other hospitals.

 

(c) Effective for discharges occurring on and after November 1, 2014, payment rates for hospital inpatient services provided by hospitals located in Minnesota or the local trade area, except for the hospitals paid under the methodologies described in paragraph (a), clauses (2) and (3), shall be rebased, incorporating cost and payment methodologies in a manner similar to Medicare.  The base year or years for the rates effective November 1, 2014, shall be calendar year 2012.  The rebasing under this paragraph shall be budget neutral, ensuring that the total aggregate payments under the rebased system are equal to the total aggregate payments that were made for the same number and types of services in the base year.  Separate budget neutrality calculations shall be determined for payments made to critical access hospitals and payments made to hospitals paid under the DRG system.  Only the rate increases or decreases under subdivision 3a or 3c that applied to the hospitals being rebased during the entire base period shall be incorporated into the budget neutrality calculation.

 

(d) For discharges occurring on or after November 1, 2014, through the next rebasing that occurs, the rebased rates under paragraph (c) that apply to hospitals under paragraph (a), clause (4), shall include adjustments to the projected rates that result in no greater than a five percent increase or decrease from the base year payments for any hospital.  Any adjustments to the rates made by the commissioner under this paragraph and paragraph (e) shall maintain budget neutrality as described in paragraph (c).

 

(e) For discharges occurring on or after November 1, 2014, the commissioner may make additional adjustments to the rebased rates, and when evaluating whether additional adjustments should be made, the commissioner shall consider the impact of the rates on the following:

 

(1) pediatric services;

 

(2) behavioral health services;

 

(3) trauma services as defined by the National Uniform Billing Committee;

 

(4) transplant services;

 

(5) obstetric services, newborn services, and behavioral health services provided by hospitals outside the seven‑county metropolitan area;

 

(6) outlier admissions;

 

(7) low-volume providers; and

 

(8) services provided by small rural hospitals that are not critical access hospitals.


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(f) Hospital payment rates established under paragraph (c) must incorporate the following:

 

(1) for hospitals paid under the DRG methodology, the base year payment rate per admission is standardized by the applicable Medicare wage index and adjusted by the hospital's disproportionate population adjustment;

 

(2) for critical access hospitals, payment rates for discharges between November 1, 2014, and June 30, 2015, shall be set to the same rate of payment that applied for discharges on October 31, 2014;

 

(3) the cost and charge data used to establish hospital payment rates must only reflect inpatient services covered by medical assistance; and

 

(4) in determining hospital payment rates for discharges occurring on or after the rate year beginning January 1, 2011, through December 31, 2012, the hospital payment rate per discharge shall be based on the cost-finding methods and allowable costs of the Medicare program in effect during the base year or years.  In determining hospital payment rates for discharges in subsequent base years, the per discharge rates shall be based on the cost‑finding methods and allowable costs of the Medicare program in effect during the base year or years.

 

(g) The commissioner shall validate the rates effective November 1, 2014, by applying the rates established under paragraph (c), and any adjustments made to the rates under paragraph (d) or (e), to hospital claims paid in calendar year 2013 to determine whether the total aggregate payments for the same number and types of services under the rebased rates are equal to the total aggregate payments made during calendar year 2013.

 

(h) Effective for discharges occurring on or after July 1, 2017, and every two years thereafter, payment rates under this section shall be rebased to reflect only those changes in hospital costs between the existing base year or years and the next base year or years.  In any year that inpatient claims volume falls below the threshold required to ensure a statically valid sample of claims, the commissioner may combine claims data from two consecutive years to serve as the base year.  Years in which inpatient claims volume is reduced or altered due to a pandemic or other public health emergency shall not be used as a base year or part of a base year if the base year includes more than one year.  Changes in costs between base years shall be measured using the lower of the hospital cost index defined in subdivision 1, paragraph (a), or the percentage change in the case mix adjusted cost per claim.  The commissioner shall establish the base year for each rebasing period considering the most recent year or years for which filed Medicare cost reports are available.  The estimated change in the average payment per hospital discharge resulting from a scheduled rebasing must be calculated and made available to the legislature by January 15 of each year in which rebasing is scheduled to occur, and must include by hospital the differential in payment rates compared to the individual hospital's costs.

 

(i) Effective for discharges occurring on or after July 1, 2015, inpatient payment rates for critical access hospitals located in Minnesota or the local trade area shall be determined using a new cost-based methodology.  The commissioner shall establish within the methodology tiers of payment designed to promote efficiency and cost‑effectiveness.  Payment rates for hospitals under this paragraph shall be set at a level that does not exceed the total cost for critical access hospitals as reflected in base year cost reports.  Until the next rebasing that occurs, the new methodology shall result in no greater than a five percent decrease from the base year payments for any hospital, except a hospital that had payments that were greater than 100 percent of the hospital's costs in the base year shall have their rate set equal to 100 percent of costs in the base year.  The rates paid for discharges on and after July 1, 2016, covered under this paragraph shall be increased by the inflation factor in subdivision 1, paragraph (a).  The new cost-based rate shall be the final rate and shall not be settled to actual incurred costs.  Hospitals shall be assigned a payment tier based on the following criteria:

 

(1) hospitals that had payments at or below 80 percent of their costs in the base year shall have a rate set that equals 85 percent of their base year costs;

 

(2) hospitals that had payments that were above 80 percent, up to and including 90 percent of their costs in the base year shall have a rate set that equals 95 percent of their base year costs; and


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(3) hospitals that had payments that were above 90 percent of their costs in the base year shall have a rate set that equals 100 percent of their base year costs.

 

(j) The commissioner may refine the payment tiers and criteria for critical access hospitals to coincide with the next rebasing under paragraph (h).  The factors used to develop the new methodology may include, but are not limited to:

 

(1) the ratio between the hospital's costs for treating medical assistance patients and the hospital's charges to the medical assistance program;

 

(2) the ratio between the hospital's costs for treating medical assistance patients and the hospital's payments received from the medical assistance program for the care of medical assistance patients;

 

(3) the ratio between the hospital's charges to the medical assistance program and the hospital's payments received from the medical assistance program for the care of medical assistance patients;

 

(4) the statewide average increases in the ratios identified in clauses (1), (2), and (3);

 

(5) the proportion of that hospital's costs that are administrative and trends in administrative costs; and

 

(6) geographic location.

 

Sec. 3.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 256.969, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

 

Subd. 2f.  Alternate inpatient payment rate.  Effective January 1, 2022, for a hospital eligible to receive disproportionate share hospital payments under subdivision 9, paragraph (d), clause (6), the commissioner shall reduce the amount calculated under subdivision 9, paragraph (d), clause (6), by 99 percent and compute an alternate inpatient payment rate.  The alternate payment rate shall be structured to target a total aggregate reimbursement amount equal to what the hospital would have received for providing fee-for-service inpatient services under this section to patients enrolled in medical assistance had the hospital received the entire amount calculated under subdivision 9, paragraph (d), clause (6).

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective January 1, 2022.

 

Sec. 4.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 256.969, subdivision 9, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 9.  Disproportionate numbers of low-income patients served.  (a) For admissions occurring on or after July 1, 1993, the medical assistance disproportionate population adjustment shall comply with federal law and shall be paid to a hospital, excluding regional treatment centers and facilities of the federal Indian Health Service, with a medical assistance inpatient utilization rate in excess of the arithmetic mean.  The adjustment must be determined as follows:

 

(1) for a hospital with a medical assistance inpatient utilization rate above the arithmetic mean for all hospitals excluding regional treatment centers and facilities of the federal Indian Health Service but less than or equal to one standard deviation above the mean, the adjustment must be determined by multiplying the total of the operating and property payment rates by the difference between the hospital's actual medical assistance inpatient utilization rate and the arithmetic mean for all hospitals excluding regional treatment centers and facilities of the federal Indian Health Service; and


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(2) for a hospital with a medical assistance inpatient utilization rate above one standard deviation above the mean, the adjustment must be determined by multiplying the adjustment that would be determined under clause (1) for that hospital by 1.1.  The commissioner shall report annually on the number of hospitals likely to receive the adjustment authorized by this paragraph.  The commissioner shall specifically report on the adjustments received by public hospitals and public hospital corporations located in cities of the first class.

 

(b) Certified public expenditures made by Hennepin County Medical Center shall be considered Medicaid disproportionate share hospital payments.  Hennepin County and Hennepin County Medical Center shall report by June 15, 2007, on payments made beginning July 1, 2005, or another date specified by the commissioner, that may qualify for reimbursement under federal law.  Based on these reports, the commissioner shall apply for federal matching funds.

 

(c) Upon federal approval of the related state plan amendment, paragraph (b) is effective retroactively from July 1, 2005, or the earliest effective date approved by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.

 

(d) Effective July 1, 2015, disproportionate share hospital (DSH) payments shall be paid in accordance with a new methodology using 2012 as the base year.  Annual payments made under this paragraph shall equal the total amount of payments made for 2012.  A licensed children's hospital shall receive only a single DSH factor for children's hospitals.  Other DSH factors may be combined to arrive at a single factor for each hospital that is eligible for DSH payments.  The new methodology shall make payments only to hospitals located in Minnesota and include the following factors:

 

(1) a licensed children's hospital with at least 1,000 fee-for-service discharges in the base year shall receive a factor of 0.868.  A licensed children's hospital with less than 1,000 fee-for-service discharges in the base year shall receive a factor of 0.7880;

 

(2) a hospital that has in effect for the initial rate year a contract with the commissioner to provide extended psychiatric inpatient services under section 256.9693 shall receive a factor of 0.0160;

 

(3) a hospital that has received medical assistance payment from the fee-for-service program for at least 20 transplant services in the base year shall receive a factor of 0.0435;

 

(4) a hospital that has a medical assistance utilization rate in the base year between 20 percent up to one standard deviation above the statewide mean utilization rate shall receive a factor of 0.0468;

 

(5) a hospital that has a medical assistance utilization rate in the base year that is at least one standard deviation above the statewide mean utilization rate but is less than two and one-half standard deviations above the mean shall receive a factor of 0.2300; and

 

(6) a hospital that is a level one trauma center and that has a medical assistance utilization rate in the base year that is at least two and one-half standard deviations above the statewide mean utilization rate shall receive a factor of 0.3711.

 

(e) For the purposes of determining eligibility for the disproportionate share hospital factors in paragraph (d), clauses (1) to (6), the medical assistance utilization rate and discharge thresholds shall be measured using only one year when a two-year base period is used.

 

(e) (f) Any payments or portion of payments made to a hospital under this subdivision that are subsequently returned to the commissioner because the payments are found to exceed the hospital-specific DSH limit for that hospital shall be redistributed, proportionate to the number of fee-for-service discharges, to other DSH-eligible non‑children's hospitals that have a medical assistance utilization rate that is at least one standard deviation above the mean.


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(f) (g) An additional payment adjustment shall be established by the commissioner under this subdivision for a hospital that provides high levels of administering high-cost drugs to enrollees in fee-for-service medical assistance.  The commissioner shall consider factors including fee-for-service medical assistance utilization rates and payments made for drugs purchased through the 340B drug purchasing program and administered to fee-for-service enrollees.  If any part of this adjustment exceeds a hospital's hospital-specific disproportionate share hospital limit, the commissioner shall make a payment to the hospital that equals the nonfederal share of the amount that exceeds the limit.  The total nonfederal share of the amount of the payment adjustment under this paragraph shall not exceed $1,500,000.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective July 1, 2021.

 

Sec. 5.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 256.9695, subdivision 1, is amended to read:

 

Subdivision 1.  Appeals.  A hospital may appeal a decision arising from the application of standards or methods under section 256.9685, 256.9686, or 256.969, if an appeal would result in a change to the hospital's payment rate or payments.  Both overpayments and underpayments that result from the submission of appeals shall be implemented.  Regardless of any appeal outcome, relative values, Medicare wage indexes, Medicare cost-to-charge ratios, and policy adjusters shall not be changed.  The appeal shall be heard by an administrative law judge according to sections 14.57 to 14.62, or upon agreement by both parties, according to a modified appeals procedure established by the commissioner and the Office of Administrative Hearings.  In any proceeding under this section, the appealing party must demonstrate by a preponderance of the evidence that the commissioner's determination is incorrect or not according to law.

 

To appeal a payment rate or payment determination or a determination made from base year information, the hospital shall file a written appeal request to the commissioner within 60 days of the date the preliminary payment rate determination was mailed.  The appeal request shall specify:  (i) the disputed items; (ii) the authority in federal or state statute or rule upon which the hospital relies for each disputed item; and (iii) the name and address of the person to contact regarding the appeal.  Facts to be considered in any appeal of base year information are limited to those in existence 12 18 months after the last day of the calendar year that is the base year for the payment rates in dispute.

 

Sec. 6.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 256.983, is amended to read:

 

256.983 FRAUD PREVENTION INVESTIGATIONS.

 

Subdivision 1.  Programs established.  Within the limits of available appropriations, the commissioner of human services shall require the maintenance of budget neutral fraud prevention investigation programs in the counties or tribal agencies participating in the fraud prevention investigation project established under this section.  If funds are sufficient, the commissioner may also extend fraud prevention investigation programs to other counties or tribal agencies provided the expansion is budget neutral to the state.  Under any expansion, the commissioner has the final authority in decisions regarding the creation and realignment of individual county, tribal agency, or regional operations.

 

Subd. 2.  County and tribal agency proposals.  Each participating county and tribal agency shall develop and submit an annual staffing and funding proposal to the commissioner no later than April 30 of each year.  Each proposal shall include, but not be limited to, the staffing and funding of the fraud prevention investigation program, a job description for investigators involved in the fraud prevention investigation program, and the organizational structure of the county or tribal agency unit, training programs for case workers, and the operational requirements which may be directed by the commissioner.  The proposal shall be approved, to include any changes directed or negotiated by the commissioner, no later than June 30 of each year.


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Subd. 3.  Department responsibilities.  The commissioner shall establish training programs which shall be attended by all investigative and supervisory staff of the involved county and tribal agencies.  The commissioner shall also develop the necessary operational guidelines, forms, and reporting mechanisms, which shall be used by the involved county or tribal agencies.  An individual's application or redetermination form for public assistance benefits, including child care assistance programs and medical care programs, must include an authorization for release by the individual to obtain documentation for any information on that form which is involved in a fraud prevention investigation.  The authorization for release is effective for six months after public assistance benefits have ceased.

 

Subd. 4.  Funding.  (a) County and tribal agency reimbursement shall be made through the settlement provisions applicable to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), MFIP, child care assistance programs, the medical assistance program, and other federal and state-funded programs.

 

(b) The commissioner will maintain program compliance if for any three consecutive month period, a county or tribal agency fails to comply with fraud prevention investigation program guidelines, or fails to meet the cost‑effectiveness standards developed by the commissioner.  This result is contingent on the commissioner providing written notice, including an offer of technical assistance, within 30 days of the end of the third or subsequent month of noncompliance.  The county or tribal agency shall be required to submit a corrective action plan to the commissioner within 30 days of receipt of a notice of noncompliance.  Failure to submit a corrective action plan or, continued deviation from standards of more than ten percent after submission of a corrective action plan, will result in denial of funding for each subsequent month, or billing the county or tribal agency for fraud prevention investigation (FPI) service provided by the commissioner, or reallocation of program grant funds, or investigative resources, or both, to other counties or tribal agencies.  The denial of funding shall apply to the general settlement received by the county or tribal agency on a quarterly basis and shall not reduce the grant amount applicable to the FPI project.

 

Subd. 5.  Child care providers; financial misconduct.  (a) A county or tribal agency may conduct investigations of financial misconduct by child care providers as described in chapter 245E.  Prior to opening an investigation, a county or tribal agency must contact the commissioner to determine whether an investigation under this chapter may compromise an ongoing investigation.

 

(b) If, upon investigation, a preponderance of evidence shows a provider committed an intentional program violation, intentionally gave the county or tribe materially false information on the provider's billing forms, provided false attendance records to a county, tribe, or the commissioner, or committed financial misconduct as described in section 245E.01, subdivision 8, the county or tribal agency may suspend a provider's payment pursuant to chapter 245E, or deny or revoke a provider's authorization pursuant to section 119B.13, subdivision 6, paragraph (d), clause (2), prior to pursuing other available remedies.  The county or tribe must send notice in accordance with the requirements of section 119B.161, subdivision 2.  If a provider's payment is suspended under this section, the payment suspension shall remain in effect until:  (1) the commissioner, county, tribe, or a law enforcement authority determines that there is insufficient evidence warranting the action and a county, tribe, or the commissioner does not pursue an additional administrative remedy under chapter 119B or 245E, or section 256.046 or 256.98; or (2) all criminal, civil, and administrative proceedings related to the provider's alleged misconduct conclude and any appeal rights are exhausted.

 

(c) For the purposes of this section, an intentional program violation includes intentionally making false or misleading statements; intentionally misrepresenting, concealing, or withholding facts; and repeatedly and intentionally violating program regulations under chapters 119B and 245E.

 

(d) A provider has the right to administrative review under section 119B.161 if:  (1) payment is suspended under chapter 245E; or (2) the provider's authorization was denied or revoked under section 119B.13, subdivision 6, paragraph (d), clause (2).


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Sec. 7.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 256B.057, subdivision 3, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 3.  Qualified Medicare beneficiaries.  (a) A person who is entitled to Part A Medicare benefits, whose income is equal to or less than 100 percent of the federal poverty guidelines, and whose assets are no more than $10,000 for a single individual and $18,000 for a married couple or family of two or more, is eligible for medical assistance reimbursement of Medicare Part A and Part B premiums, Part A and Part B coinsurance and deductibles, and cost-effective premiums for enrollment with a health maintenance organization or a competitive medical plan under section 1876 of the Social Security Act. if:

 

(1) the person is entitled to Medicare Part A benefits;

 

(2) the person's income is equal to or less than 100 percent of the federal poverty guidelines; and

 

(3) the person's assets are no more than (i) $10,000 for a single individual, or (ii) $18,000 for a married couple or family of two or more; or, when the resource limits for eligibility for the Medicare Part D extra help low income subsidy (LIS) exceed either amount in item (i) or (ii), the person's assets are no more than the LIS resource limit in United States Code, title 42, section 1396d, subsection (p).

 

(b) Reimbursement of the Medicare coinsurance and deductibles, when added to the amount paid by Medicare, must not exceed the total rate the provider would have received for the same service or services if the person were a medical assistance recipient with Medicare coverage.  Increases in benefits under Title II of the Social Security Act shall not be counted as income for purposes of this subdivision until July 1 of each year.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective the day following final enactment.

 

Sec. 8.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 256B.0625, subdivision 3c, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 3c.  Health Services Policy Committee Advisory Council.  (a) The commissioner, after receiving recommendations from professional physician associations, professional associations representing licensed nonphysician health care professionals, and consumer groups, shall establish a 13-member 14-member Health Services Policy Committee Advisory Council, which consists of 12 13 voting members and one nonvoting member.  The Health Services Policy Committee Advisory Council shall advise the commissioner regarding (1) health services pertaining to the administration of health care benefits covered under the medical assistance and MinnesotaCare programs Minnesota health care programs (MHCP); and (2) evidence-based decision-making and health care benefit and coverage policies for MHCP.  The Health Services Advisory Council shall consider available evidence regarding quality, safety, and cost-effectiveness when advising the commissioner.  The Health Services Policy Committee Advisory Council shall meet at least quarterly.  The Health Services Policy Committee Advisory Council shall annually elect select a physician chair from among its members, who shall work directly with the commissioner's medical director, to establish the agenda for each meeting.  The Health Services Policy Committee shall also Advisory Council may recommend criteria for verifying centers of excellence for specific aspects of medical care where a specific set of combined services, a volume of patients necessary to maintain a high level of competency, or a specific level of technical capacity is associated with improved health outcomes.

 

(b) The commissioner shall establish a dental subcommittee subcouncil to operate under the Health Services Policy Committee Advisory Council.  The dental subcommittee subcouncil consists of general dentists, dental specialists, safety net providers, dental hygienists, health plan company and county and public health representatives, health researchers, consumers, and a designee of the commissioner of health.  The dental subcommittee subcouncil shall advise the commissioner regarding:

 

(1) the critical access dental program under section 256B.76, subdivision 4, including but not limited to criteria for designating and terminating critical access dental providers;


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(2) any changes to the critical access dental provider program necessary to comply with program expenditure limits;

 

(3) dental coverage policy based on evidence, quality, continuity of care, and best practices;

 

(4) the development of dental delivery models; and

 

(5) dental services to be added or eliminated from subdivision 9, paragraph (b).

 

(c) The Health Services Policy Committee shall study approaches to making provider reimbursement under the medical assistance and MinnesotaCare programs contingent on patient participation in a patient-centered decision‑making process, and shall evaluate the impact of these approaches on health care quality, patient satisfaction, and health care costs.  The committee shall present findings and recommendations to the commissioner and the legislative committees with jurisdiction over health care by January 15, 2010.

 

(d) (c) The Health Services Policy Committee shall Advisory Council may monitor and track the practice patterns of physicians providing services to medical assistance and MinnesotaCare enrollees health care providers who serve MHCP recipients under fee-for-service, managed care, and county-based purchasing.  The committee monitoring and tracking shall focus on services or specialties for which there is a high variation in utilization or quality across physicians providers, or which are associated with high medical costs.  The commissioner, based upon the findings of the committee Health Services Advisory Council, shall regularly may notify physicians providers whose practice patterns indicate below average quality or higher than average utilization or costs.  Managed care and county-based purchasing plans shall provide the commissioner with utilization and cost data necessary to implement this paragraph, and the commissioner shall make this these data available to the committee Health Services Advisory Council.

 

(e) The Health Services Policy Committee shall review caesarean section rates for the fee-for-service medical assistance population.  The committee may develop best practices policies related to the minimization of caesarean sections, including but not limited to standards and guidelines for health care providers and health care facilities.

 

Sec. 9.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 256B.0625, subdivision 3d, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 3d.  Health Services Policy Committee Advisory Council members.  (a) The Health Services Policy Committee Advisory Council consists of:

 

(1) seven six voting members who are licensed physicians actively engaged in the practice of medicine in Minnesota, one of whom must be actively engaged in the treatment of persons with mental illness, and three of whom must represent health plans currently under contract to serve medical assistance MHCP recipients;

 

(2) two voting members who are licensed physician specialists actively practicing their specialty in Minnesota;

 

(3) two voting members who are nonphysician health care professionals licensed or registered in their profession and actively engaged in their practice of their profession in Minnesota;

 

(4) one voting member who is a health care or mental health professional licensed or registered in the member's profession, actively engaged in the practice of the member's profession in Minnesota, and actively engaged in the treatment of persons with mental illness;

 

(4) one consumer (5) two consumers who shall serve as a voting member members; and

 

(5) (6) the commissioner's medical director who shall serve as a nonvoting member.


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(b) Members of the Health Services Policy Committee Advisory Council shall not be employed by the Department of Human Services state of Minnesota, except for the medical director.  A quorum shall comprise a simple majority of the voting members.  Vacant seats shall not count toward a quorum.

 

Sec. 10.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 256B.0625, subdivision 3e, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 3e.  Health Services Policy Committee Advisory Council terms and compensation.  Committee Members shall serve staggered three-year terms, with one-third of the voting members' terms expiring annually.  Members may be reappointed by the commissioner.  The commissioner may require more frequent Health Services Policy Committee Advisory Council meetings as needed.  An honorarium of $200 per meeting and reimbursement for mileage and parking shall be paid to each committee council member in attendance except the medical director.  The Health Services Policy Committee Advisory Council does not expire as provided in section 15.059, subdivision 6.

 

Sec. 11.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 256B.0625, subdivision 30, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 30.  Other clinic services.  (a) Medical assistance covers rural health clinic services, federally qualified health center services, nonprofit community health clinic services, and public health clinic services.  Rural health clinic services and federally qualified health center services mean services defined in United States Code, title 42, section 1396d(a)(2)(B) and (C).  Payment for rural health clinic and federally qualified health center services shall be made according to applicable federal law and regulation.

 

(b) A federally qualified health center (FQHC) that is beginning initial operation shall submit an estimate of budgeted costs and visits for the initial reporting period in the form and detail required by the commissioner.  An FQHC that is already in operation shall submit an initial report using actual costs and visits for the initial reporting period.  Within 90 days of the end of its reporting period, an FQHC shall submit, in the form and detail required by the commissioner, a report of its operations, including allowable costs actually incurred for the period and the actual number of visits for services furnished during the period, and other information required by the commissioner.  FQHCs that file Medicare cost reports shall provide the commissioner with a copy of the most recent Medicare cost report filed with the Medicare program intermediary for the reporting year which support the costs claimed on their cost report to the state.

 

(c) In order to continue cost-based payment under the medical assistance program according to paragraphs (a) and (b), an FQHC or rural health clinic must apply for designation as an essential community provider within six months of final adoption of rules by the Department of Health according to section 62Q.19, subdivision 7.  For those FQHCs and rural health clinics that have applied for essential community provider status within the six-month time prescribed, medical assistance payments will continue to be made according to paragraphs (a) and (b) for the first three years after application.  For FQHCs and rural health clinics that either do not apply within the time specified above or who have had essential community provider status for three years, medical assistance payments for health services provided by these entities shall be according to the same rates and conditions applicable to the same service provided by health care providers that are not FQHCs or rural health clinics.

 

(d) Effective July 1, 1999, the provisions of paragraph (c) requiring an FQHC or a rural health clinic to make application for an essential community provider designation in order to have cost-based payments made according to paragraphs (a) and (b) no longer apply.

 

(e) Effective January 1, 2000, payments made according to paragraphs (a) and (b) shall be limited to the cost phase-out schedule of the Balanced Budget Act of 1997.

 

(f) Effective January 1, 2001, through December 31, 2020, each FQHC and rural health clinic may elect to be paid either under the prospective payment system established in United States Code, title 42, section 1396a(aa), or under an alternative payment methodology consistent with the requirements of United States Code, title 42, section 1396a(aa), and approved by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.  The alternative payment methodology shall be 100 percent of cost as determined according to Medicare cost principles.


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(g) Effective for services provided on or after January 1, 2021, all claims for payment of clinic services provided by FQHCs and rural health clinics shall be paid by the commissioner, according to an annual election by the FQHC or rural health clinic, under the current prospective payment system described in paragraph (f) or the alternative payment methodology described in paragraph (l).

 

(h) For purposes of this section, "nonprofit community clinic" is a clinic that:

 

(1) has nonprofit status as specified in chapter 317A;

 

(2) has tax exempt status as provided in Internal Revenue Code, section 501(c)(3);

 

(3) is established to provide health services to low-income population groups, uninsured, high-risk and special needs populations, underserved and other special needs populations;

 

(4) employs professional staff at least one-half of which are familiar with the cultural background of their clients;

 

(5) charges for services on a sliding fee scale designed to provide assistance to low-income clients based on current poverty income guidelines and family size; and

 

(6) does not restrict access or services because of a client's financial limitations or public assistance status and provides no-cost care as needed.

 

(i) Effective for services provided on or after January 1, 2015, all claims for payment of clinic services provided by FQHCs and rural health clinics shall be paid by the commissioner.  the commissioner shall determine the most feasible method for paying claims from the following options:

 

(1) FQHCs and rural health clinics submit claims directly to the commissioner for payment, and the commissioner provides claims information for recipients enrolled in a managed care or county-based purchasing plan to the plan, on a regular basis; or

 

(2) FQHCs and rural health clinics submit claims for recipients enrolled in a managed care or county-based purchasing plan to the plan, and those claims are submitted by the plan to the commissioner for payment to the clinic.

 

(j) For clinic services provided prior to January 1, 2015, the commissioner shall calculate and pay monthly the proposed managed care supplemental payments to clinics, and clinics shall conduct a timely review of the payment calculation data in order to finalize all supplemental payments in accordance with federal law.  Any issues arising from a clinic's review must be reported to the commissioner by January 1, 2017.  Upon final agreement between the commissioner and a clinic on issues identified under this subdivision, and in accordance with United States Code, title 42, section 1396a(bb), no supplemental payments for managed care plan or county-based purchasing plan claims for services provided prior to January 1, 2015, shall be made after June 30, 2017.  If the commissioner and clinics are unable to resolve issues under this subdivision, the parties shall submit the dispute to the arbitration process under section 14.57.

 

(k) The commissioner shall seek a federal waiver, authorized under section 1115 of the Social Security Act, to obtain federal financial participation at the 100 percent federal matching percentage available to facilities of the Indian Health Service or tribal organization in accordance with section 1905(b) of the Social Security Act for expenditures made to organizations dually certified under Title V of the Indian Health Care Improvement Act, Public Law 94-437, and as a federally qualified health center under paragraph (a) that provides services to American Indian and Alaskan Native individuals eligible for services under this subdivision.


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(l) All claims for payment of clinic services provided by FQHCs and rural health clinics, that have elected to be paid under this paragraph, shall be paid by the commissioner according to the following requirements:

 

(1) the commissioner shall establish a single medical and single dental organization encounter rate for each FQHC and rural health clinic when applicable;

 

(2) each FQHC and rural health clinic is eligible for same day reimbursement of one medical and one dental organization encounter rate if eligible medical and dental visits are provided on the same day;

 

(3) the commissioner shall reimburse FQHCs and rural health clinics, in accordance with current applicable Medicare cost principles, their allowable costs, including direct patient care costs and patient-related support services.  Nonallowable costs include, but are not limited to:

 

(i) general social services and administrative costs;

 

(ii) retail pharmacy;

 

(iii) patient incentives, food, housing assistance, and utility assistance;

 

(iv) external lab and x-ray;

 

(v) navigation services;

 

(vi) health care taxes;

 

(vii) advertising, public relations, and marketing;

 

(viii) office entertainment costs, food, alcohol, and gifts;

 

(ix) contributions and donations;

 

(x) bad debts or losses on awards or contracts;

 

(xi) fines, penalties, damages, or other settlements;

 

(xii) fund-raising, investment management, and associated administrative costs;

 

(xiii) research and associated administrative costs;

 

(xiv) nonpaid workers;

 

(xv) lobbying;

 

(xvi) scholarships and student aid; and

 

(xvii) nonmedical assistance covered services;

 

(4) the commissioner shall review the list of nonallowable costs in the years between the rebasing process established in clause (5), in consultation with the Minnesota Association of Community Health Centers, FQHCs, and rural health clinics.  The commissioner shall publish the list and any updates in the Minnesota health care programs provider manual;


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(5) the initial applicable base year organization encounter rates for FQHCs and rural health clinics shall be computed for services delivered on or after January 1, 2021, and:

 

(i) must be determined using each FQHC's and rural health clinic's Medicare cost reports from 2017 and 2018;

 

(ii) must be according to current applicable Medicare cost principles as applicable to FQHCs and rural health clinics without the application of productivity screens and upper payment limits or the Medicare prospective payment system FQHC aggregate mean upper payment limit;

 

(iii) must be subsequently rebased every two years thereafter using the Medicare cost reports that are three and four years prior to the rebasing year.  Years in which organizational cost or claims volume is reduced or altered due to a pandemic, disease, or other public health emergency shall not be used as part of a base year when the base year includes more than one year.  The commissioner may use the Medicare cost reports of a year unaffected by a pandemic, disease, or other public health emergency, or previous two consecutive years, inflated to the base year as established under item (iv);

 

(iv) must be inflated to the base year using the inflation factor described in clause (6); and

 

(v) the commissioner must provide for a 60-day appeals process under section 14.57;

 

(6) the commissioner shall annually inflate the applicable organization encounter rates for FQHCs and rural health clinics from the base year payment rate to the effective date by using the CMS FQHC Market Basket inflator established under United States Code, title 42, section 1395m(o), less productivity;

 

(7) FQHCs and rural health clinics that have elected the alternative payment methodology under this paragraph shall submit all necessary documentation required by the commissioner to compute the rebased organization encounter rates no later than six months following the date the applicable Medicare cost reports are due to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services;

 

(8) the commissioner shall reimburse FQHCs and rural health clinics an additional amount relative to their medical and dental organization encounter rates that is attributable to the tax required to be paid according to section 295.52, if applicable;

 

(9) FQHCs and rural health clinics may submit change of scope requests to the commissioner if the change of scope would result in an increase or decrease of 2.5 percent or higher in the medical or dental organization encounter rate currently received by the FQHC or rural health clinic;

 

(10) for FQHCs and rural health clinics seeking a change in scope with the commissioner under clause (9) that requires the approval of the scope change by the federal Health Resources Services Administration:

 

(i) FQHCs and rural health clinics shall submit the change of scope request, including the start date of services, to the commissioner within seven business days of submission of the scope change to the federal Health Resources Services Administration;

 

(ii) the commissioner shall establish the effective date of the payment change as the federal Health Resources Services Administration date of approval of the FQHC's or rural health clinic's scope change request, or the effective start date of services, whichever is later; and

 

(iii) within 45 days of one year after the effective date established in item (ii), the commissioner shall conduct a retroactive review to determine if the actual costs established under clause (3) or encounters result in an increase or decrease of 2.5 percent or higher in the medical or dental organization encounter rate, and if this is the case, the commissioner shall revise the rate accordingly and shall adjust payments retrospectively to the effective date established in item (ii);


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(11) for change of scope requests that do not require federal Health Resources Services Administration approval, the FQHC and rural health clinic shall submit the request to the commissioner before implementing the change, and the effective date of the change is the date the commissioner received the FQHC's or rural health clinic's request, or the effective start date of the service, whichever is later.  The commissioner shall provide a response to the FQHC's or rural health clinic's request within 45 days of submission and provide a final approval within 120 days of submission.  This timeline may be waived at the mutual agreement of the commissioner and the FQHC or rural health clinic if more information is needed to evaluate the request;

 

(12) the commissioner, when establishing organization encounter rates for new FQHCs and rural health clinics, shall consider the patient caseload of existing FQHCs and rural health clinics in a 60-mile radius for organizations established outside of the seven-county metropolitan area, and in a 30-mile radius for organizations in the seven‑county metropolitan area.  If this information is not available, the commissioner may use Medicare cost reports or audited financial statements to establish base rate;

 

(13) the commissioner shall establish a quality measures workgroup that includes representatives from the Minnesota Association of Community Health Centers, FQHCs, and rural health clinics, to evaluate clinical and nonclinical measures; and

 

(14) the commissioner shall not disallow or reduce costs that are related to an FQHC's or rural health clinic's participation in health care educational programs to the extent that the costs are not accounted for in the alternative payment methodology encounter rate established in this paragraph.

 

Sec. 12.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 256B.0638, subdivision 3, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 3.  Opioid prescribing work group.  (a) The commissioner of human services, in consultation with the commissioner of health, shall appoint the following voting members to an opioid prescribing work group:

 

(1) two consumer members who have been impacted by an opioid abuse disorder or opioid dependence disorder, either personally or with family members;

 

(2) one member who is a licensed physician actively practicing in Minnesota and registered as a practitioner with the DEA;

 

(3) one member who is a licensed pharmacist actively practicing in Minnesota and registered as a practitioner with the DEA;

 

(4) one member who is a licensed nurse practitioner actively practicing in Minnesota and registered as a practitioner with the DEA;

 

(5) one member who is a licensed dentist actively practicing in Minnesota and registered as a practitioner with the DEA;

 

(6) two members who are nonphysician licensed health care professionals actively engaged in the practice of their profession in Minnesota, and their practice includes treating pain;

 

(7) one member who is a mental health professional who is licensed or registered in a mental health profession, who is actively engaged in the practice of that profession in Minnesota, and whose practice includes treating patients with chemical dependency or substance abuse;

 

(8) one member who is a medical examiner for a Minnesota county;

 

(9) one member of the Health Services Policy Committee established under section 256B.0625, subdivisions 3c to 3e;


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(10) one member who is a medical director of a health plan company doing business in Minnesota;

 

(11) one member who is a pharmacy director of a health plan company doing business in Minnesota; and

 

(12) one member representing Minnesota law enforcement.; and

 

(13) two consumer members who are Minnesota residents and who have used or are using opioids to manage chronic pain.

 

(b) In addition, the work group shall include the following nonvoting members:

 

(1) the medical director for the medical assistance program;

 

(2) a member representing the Department of Human Services pharmacy unit; and

 

(3) the medical director for the Department of Labor and Industry.; and

 

(4) a member representing the Minnesota Department of Health.

 

(c) An honorarium of $200 per meeting and reimbursement for mileage and parking shall be paid to each voting member in attendance.

 

Sec. 13.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 256B.0638, subdivision 5, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 5.  Program implementation.  (a) The commissioner shall implement the programs within the Minnesota health care program to improve the health of and quality of care provided to Minnesota health care program enrollees.  The commissioner shall annually collect and report to provider groups the sentinel measures of data showing individual opioid prescribers data showing the sentinel measures of their prescribers' opioid prescribing patterns compared to their anonymized peers.  Provider groups shall distribute data to their affiliated, contracted, or employed opioid prescribers.

 

(b) The commissioner shall notify an opioid prescriber and all provider groups with which the opioid prescriber is employed or affiliated when the opioid prescriber's prescribing pattern exceeds the opioid quality improvement standard thresholds.  An opioid prescriber and any provider group that receives a notice under this paragraph shall submit to the commissioner a quality improvement plan for review and approval by the commissioner with the goal of bringing the opioid prescriber's prescribing practices into alignment with community standards.  A quality improvement plan must include:

 

(1) components of the program described in subdivision 4, paragraph (a);

 

(2) internal practice-based measures to review the prescribing practice of the opioid prescriber and, where appropriate, any other opioid prescribers employed by or affiliated with any of the provider groups with which the opioid prescriber is employed or affiliated; and

 

(3) appropriate use of the prescription monitoring program under section 152.126.

 

(c) If, after a year from the commissioner's notice under paragraph (b), the opioid prescriber's prescribing practices do not improve so that they are consistent with community standards, the commissioner shall take one or more of the following steps:

 

(1) monitor prescribing practices more frequently than annually;


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(2) monitor more aspects of the opioid prescriber's prescribing practices than the sentinel measures; or

 

(3) require the opioid prescriber to participate in additional quality improvement efforts, including but not limited to mandatory use of the prescription monitoring program established under section 152.126.

 

(d) The commissioner shall terminate from Minnesota health care programs all opioid prescribers and provider groups whose prescribing practices fall within the applicable opioid disenrollment standards.

 

Sec. 14.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 256B.0638, subdivision 6, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 6.  Data practices.  (a) Reports and data identifying an opioid prescriber are private data on individuals as defined under section 13.02, subdivision 12, until an opioid prescriber is subject to termination as a medical assistance provider under this section.  Notwithstanding this data classification, the commissioner shall share with all of the provider groups with which an opioid prescriber is employed, contracted, or affiliated, a report identifying an opioid prescriber who is subject to quality improvement activities the data under subdivision 5, paragraph (a), (b), or (c).

 

(b) Reports and data identifying a provider group are nonpublic data as defined under section 13.02, subdivision 9, until the provider group is subject to termination as a medical assistance provider under this section.

 

(c) Upon termination under this section, reports and data identifying an opioid prescriber or provider group are public, except that any identifying information of Minnesota health care program enrollees must be redacted by the commissioner.

 

Sec. 15.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 256B.0659, subdivision 13, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 13.  Qualified professional; qualifications.  (a) The qualified professional must work for a personal care assistance provider agency, meet the definition of qualified professional under section 256B.0625, subdivision 19c, and enroll with the department as a qualified professional after clearing clear a background study, and meet provider training requirements.  Before a qualified professional provides services, the personal care assistance provider agency must initiate a background study on the qualified professional under chapter 245C, and the personal care assistance provider agency must have received a notice from the commissioner that the qualified professional:

 

(1) is not disqualified under section 245C.14; or

 

(2) is disqualified, but the qualified professional has received a set aside of the disqualification under section 245C.22.

 

(b) The qualified professional shall perform the duties of training, supervision, and evaluation of the personal care assistance staff and evaluation of the effectiveness of personal care assistance services.  The qualified professional shall:

 

(1) develop and monitor with the recipient a personal care assistance care plan based on the service plan and individualized needs of the recipient;

 

(2) develop and monitor with the recipient a monthly plan for the use of personal care assistance services;

 

(3) review documentation of personal care assistance services provided;

 

(4) provide training and ensure competency for the personal care assistant in the individual needs of the recipient; and


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(5) document all training, communication, evaluations, and needed actions to improve performance of the personal care assistants.

 

(c) Effective July 1, 2011, The qualified professional shall complete the provider training with basic information about the personal care assistance program approved by the commissioner.  Newly hired qualified professionals must complete the training within six months of the date hired by a personal care assistance provider agency.  Qualified professionals who have completed the required training as a worker from a personal care assistance provider agency do not need to repeat the required training if they are hired by another agency, if they have completed the training within the last three years.  The required training must be available with meaningful access according to title VI of the Civil Rights Act and federal regulations adopted under that law or any guidance from the United States Health and Human Services Department.  The required training must be available online or by electronic remote connection.  The required training must provide for competency testing to demonstrate an understanding of the content without attending in-person training.  A qualified professional is allowed to be employed and is not subject to the training requirement until the training is offered online or through remote electronic connection.  A qualified professional employed by a personal care assistance provider agency certified for participation in Medicare as a home health agency is exempt from the training required in this subdivision.  When available, the qualified professional working for a Medicare-certified home health agency must successfully complete the competency test.  The commissioner shall ensure there is a mechanism in place to verify the identity of persons completing the competency testing electronically.

 

Sec. 16.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 256B.196, subdivision 2, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 2.  Commissioner's duties.  (a) For the purposes of this subdivision and subdivision 3, the commissioner shall determine the fee-for-service outpatient hospital services upper payment limit for nonstate government hospitals.  The commissioner shall then determine the amount of a supplemental payment to Hennepin County Medical Center and Regions Hospital for these services that would increase medical assistance spending in this category to the aggregate upper payment limit for all nonstate government hospitals in Minnesota.  In making this determination, the commissioner shall allot the available increases between Hennepin County Medical Center and Regions Hospital based on the ratio of medical assistance fee-for-service outpatient hospital payments to the two facilities.  The commissioner shall adjust this allotment as necessary based on federal approvals, the amount of intergovernmental transfers received from Hennepin and Ramsey Counties, and other factors, in order to maximize the additional total payments.  The commissioner shall inform Hennepin County and Ramsey County of the periodic intergovernmental transfers necessary to match federal Medicaid payments available under this subdivision in order to make supplementary medical assistance payments to Hennepin County Medical Center and Regions Hospital equal to an amount that when combined with existing medical assistance payments to nonstate governmental hospitals would increase total payments to hospitals in this category for outpatient services to the aggregate upper payment limit for all hospitals in this category in Minnesota.  Upon receipt of these periodic transfers, the commissioner shall make supplementary payments to Hennepin County Medical Center and Regions Hospital.

 

(b) For the purposes of this subdivision and subdivision 3, the commissioner shall determine an upper payment limit for physicians and other billing professionals affiliated with Hennepin County Medical Center and with Regions Hospital.  The upper payment limit shall be based on the average commercial rate or be determined using another method acceptable to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.  The commissioner shall inform Hennepin County and Ramsey County of the periodic intergovernmental transfers necessary to match the federal Medicaid payments available under this subdivision in order to make supplementary payments to physicians and other billing professionals affiliated with Hennepin County Medical Center and to make supplementary payments to physicians and other billing professionals affiliated with Regions Hospital through HealthPartners Medical Group equal to the difference between the established medical assistance payment for physician and other billing professional services and the upper payment limit.  Upon receipt of these periodic transfers, the commissioner shall make supplementary payments to physicians and other billing professionals affiliated with Hennepin County Medical Center and shall make supplementary payments to physicians and other billing professionals affiliated with Regions Hospital through HealthPartners Medical Group.


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(c) Beginning January 1, 2010, Hennepin County and Ramsey County may make monthly voluntary intergovernmental transfers to the commissioner in amounts not to exceed $12,000,000 per year from Hennepin County and $6,000,000 per year from Ramsey County.  The commissioner shall increase the medical assistance capitation payments to any licensed health plan under contract with the medical assistance program that agrees to make enhanced payments to Hennepin County Medical Center or Regions Hospital.  The increase shall be in an amount equal to the annual value of the monthly transfers plus federal financial participation, with each health plan receiving its pro rata share of the increase based on the pro rata share of medical assistance admissions to Hennepin County Medical Center and Regions Hospital by those plans.  For the purposes of this paragraph, "the base amount" means the total annual value of increased medical assistance capitation payments, including the voluntary intergovernmental transfers, under this paragraph in calendar year 2017.  For managed care contracts beginning on or after January 1, 2018, the commissioner shall reduce the total annual value of increased medical assistance capitation payments under this paragraph by an amount equal to ten percent of the base amount, and by an additional ten percent of the base amount for each subsequent contract year until December 31, 2025.  Upon the request of the commissioner, health plans shall submit individual-level cost data for verification purposes.  The commissioner may ratably reduce these payments on a pro rata basis in order to satisfy federal requirements for actuarial soundness.  If payments are reduced, transfers shall be reduced accordingly.  Any licensed health plan that receives increased medical assistance capitation payments under the intergovernmental transfer described in this paragraph shall increase its medical assistance payments to Hennepin County Medical Center and Regions Hospital by the same amount as the increased payments received in the capitation payment described in this paragraph.  This paragraph expires January 1, 2026.

 

(d) For the purposes of this subdivision and subdivision 3, the commissioner shall determine an upper payment limit for ambulance services affiliated with Hennepin County Medical Center and the city of St. Paul, and ambulance services owned and operated by another governmental entity that chooses to participate by requesting the commissioner to determine an upper payment limit.  The upper payment limit shall be based on the average commercial rate or be determined using another method acceptable to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.  The commissioner shall inform Hennepin County, the city of St. Paul, and other participating governmental entities of the periodic intergovernmental transfers necessary to match the federal Medicaid payments available under this subdivision in order to make supplementary payments to Hennepin County Medical Center, the city of St. Paul, and other participating governmental entities equal to the difference between the established medical assistance payment for ambulance services and the upper payment limit.  Upon receipt of these periodic transfers, the commissioner shall make supplementary payments to Hennepin County Medical Center, the city of St. Paul, and other participating governmental entities.  A tribal government that owns and operates an ambulance service is not eligible to participate under this subdivision.

 

(e) For the purposes of this subdivision and subdivision 3, the commissioner shall determine an upper payment limit for physicians, dentists, and other billing professionals affiliated with the University of Minnesota and University of Minnesota Physicians.  The upper payment limit shall be based on the average commercial rate or be determined using another method acceptable to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.  The commissioner shall inform the University of Minnesota Medical School and University of Minnesota School of Dentistry of the periodic intergovernmental transfers necessary to match the federal Medicaid payments available under this subdivision in order to make supplementary payments to physicians, dentists, and other billing professionals affiliated with the University of Minnesota and the University of Minnesota Physicians equal to the difference between the established medical assistance payment for physician, dentist, and other billing professional services and the upper payment limit.  Upon receipt of these periodic transfers, the commissioner shall make supplementary payments to physicians, dentists, and other billing professionals affiliated with the University of Minnesota and the University of Minnesota Physicians.

 

(f) The commissioner shall inform the transferring governmental entities on an ongoing basis of the need for any changes needed in the intergovernmental transfers in order to continue the payments under paragraphs (a) to (e), at their maximum level, including increases in upper payment limits, changes in the federal Medicaid match, and other factors.


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(g) The payments in paragraphs (a) to (e) shall be implemented independently of each other, subject to federal approval and to the receipt of transfers under subdivision 3.

 

(h) All of the data and funding transactions related to the payments in paragraphs (a) to (e) shall be between the commissioner and the governmental entities.

 

(i) For purposes of this subdivision, billing professionals are limited to physicians, nurse practitioners, nurse midwives, clinical nurse specialists, physician assistants, anesthesiologists, certified registered nurse anesthetists, dentists, dental hygienists, and dental therapists.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective January 1, 2022, or upon federal approval of both this section and Minnesota Statutes, section 256B.1973, whichever is later.  The commissioner of human services shall notify the revisor of statutes when federal approval is obtained.

 

Sec. 17.  [256B.1973] DIRECTED PAYMENT ARRANGEMENTS.

 

Subdivision 1.  Definitions.  (a) For the purposes of this section, the following terms have the meanings given them.

 

(b) "Billing professionals" means physicians, nurse practitioners, nurse midwives, clinical nurse specialists, physician assistants, anesthesiologists, and certified registered anesthetists, and may include dentists, individually enrolled dental hygienists, and dental therapists.

 

(c) "Health plan" means a managed care or county-based purchasing plan that is under contract with the commissioner to deliver services to medical assistance enrollees under section 256B.69.

 

(d) "High medical assistance utilization" means a medical assistance utilization rate equal to the standard established in section 256.969, subdivision 9, paragraph (d), clause (6).

 

Subd. 2.  Federal approval required.  Each directed payment arrangement under this section is contingent on federal approval and must conform with the requirements for permissible directed managed care organization expenditures under section 256B.6928, subdivision 5.

 

Subd. 3.  Eligible providers.  Eligible providers under this section are nonstate government teaching hospitals with high medical assistance utilization and a level 1 trauma center and all of the hospital's owned or affiliated billing professionals, ambulance services, sites, and clinics.

 

Subd. 4.  Voluntary intergovernmental transfers.  A nonstate governmental entity that is eligible to perform intergovernmental transfers may make voluntary intergovernmental transfers to the commissioner.  The commissioner shall inform the nonstate governmental entity of the intergovernmental transfers necessary to maximize the allowable directed payments.

 

Subd. 5.  Commissioner's duties; state-directed fee schedule requirement.  (a) For each federally approved directed payment arrangement that is a state-directed fee schedule requirement, the commissioner shall determine a uniform adjustment factor to be applied to each claim submitted by an eligible provider to a health plan.  The uniform adjustment factor shall be determined using the average commercial payer rate or using another method acceptable to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services if the average commercial payer rate is not approved, minus the amount necessary for the plan to satisfy tax liabilities under sections 256.9657 and 297I.05 attributable to the directed payment arrangement.  The commissioner shall ensure that the application of the uniform adjustment factor maximizes the allowable directed payments and does not result in payments exceeding federal limits, and may use an annual settle-up process.  The directed payment shall be specific to each health plan and prospectively incorporated into capitation payments for that plan.


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(b) For each federally approved directed payment arrangement that is a state-directed fee schedule requirement, the commissioner shall develop a plan for the initial implementation of the state-directed fee schedule requirement to ensure that the eligible provider receives the entire permissible value of the federally approved directed payment arrangement.  If federal approval of a directed payment arrangement under this subdivision is retroactive, the commissioner shall make a onetime pro rata increase to the uniform adjustment factor and the initial payments in order to include claims submitted between the retroactive federal approval date and the period captured by the initial payments.

 

Subd. 6.  Health plan duties; submission of claims.  In accordance with its contract, each health plan shall submit to the commissioner payment information for each claim paid to an eligible provider for services provided to a medical assistance enrollee.

 

Subd. 7.  Health plan duties; directed payments.  In accordance with its contract, each health plan shall make directed payments to the eligible provider in an amount equal to the payment amounts the plan received from the commissioner.

 

Subd. 8.  State quality goals.  The directed payment arrangement and state-directed fee schedule requirement must align the state quality goals to Hennepin Healthcare medical assistance patients, including unstably housed individuals, those with higher levels of social and clinical risk, limited English proficiency (LEP) patients, adults with serious chronic conditions, and individuals of color.  The directed payment arrangement must maintain quality and access to a full range of health care delivery mechanisms for these patients that may include behavioral health, emergent care, preventive care, hospitalization, transportation, interpreter services, and pharmaceutical services.  The commissioner, in consultation with Hennepin Healthcare, shall submit to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services a methodology to measure access to care and the achievement of state quality goals.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective January 1, 2022, or upon federal approval, whichever is later, unless the federal approval provides for an effective date after July 1, 2021, but before the date of federal approval, in which case the federally approved effective date applies.

 

Sec. 18.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 256B.6928, subdivision 5, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 5.  Direction of managed care organization expenditures.  (a) The commissioner shall not direct managed care organizations expenditures under the managed care contract, except in as permitted under Code of Federal Regulations, part 42, section 438.6(c).  The exception under this paragraph includes the following situations:

 

(1) implementation of a value-based purchasing model for provider reimbursement, including pay‑for‑performance arrangements, bundled payments, or other service payments intended to recognize value or outcomes over volume of services;

 

(2) participation in a multipayer or medical assistance-specific delivery system reform or performance improvement initiative; or

 

(3) implementation of a minimum or maximum fee schedule, or a uniform dollar or percentage increase for network providers that provide a particular service.  The maximum fee schedule must allow the managed care organization the ability to reasonably manage risk and provide discretion in accomplishing the goals of the contract.

 

(b) Any managed care contract that directs managed care organization expenditures as permitted under paragraph (a), clauses (1) to (3), must be developed in accordance with Code of Federal Regulations, part 42, sections 438.4 and 438.5; comply with actuarial soundness and generally accepted actuarial principles and practices; and have written approval from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services before implementation.  To obtain approval, the commissioner shall demonstrate in writing that the contract arrangement:


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(1) is based on the utilization and delivery of services;

 

(2) directs expenditures equally, using the same terms of performance for a class of providers providing service under the contract;

 

(3) is intended to advance at least one of the goals and objectives in the commissioner's quality strategy;

 

(4) has an evaluation plan that measures the degree to which the arrangement advances at least one of the goals in the commissioner's quality strategy;

 

(5) does not condition network provider participation on the network provider entering into or adhering to an intergovernmental transfer agreement; and

 

(6) is not renewed automatically.

 

(c) For contract arrangements identified in paragraph (a), clauses (1) and (2), the commissioner shall:

 

(1) make participation in the value-based purchasing model, special delivery system reform, or performance improvement initiative available, using the same terms of performance, to a class of providers providing services under the contract related to the model, reform, or initiative; and

 

(2) use a common set of performance measures across all payers and providers.

 

(d) The commissioner shall not set the amount or frequency of the expenditures or recoup from the managed care organization any unspent funds allocated for these arrangements.

 

Sec. 19.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 256L.01, subdivision 5, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 5.  Income.  "Income" has the meaning given for modified adjusted gross income, as defined in Code of Federal Regulations, title 26, section 1.36B-1, and means a household's current income, or if income fluctuates month to month, the income for the 12-month eligibility period projected annual income for the applicable tax year.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective the day following final enactment.

 

Sec. 20.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 256L.04, subdivision 7b, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 7b.  Annual income limits adjustment.  The commissioner shall adjust the income limits under this section annually each July 1 on January 1 as described in section 256B.056, subdivision 1c provided in Code of Federal Regulations, title 26, section 1.36B-1(h).

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective the day following final enactment.

 

Sec. 21.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 256L.05, subdivision 3a, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 3a.  Redetermination of eligibility.  (a) An enrollee's eligibility must be redetermined on an annual basis, in accordance with Code of Federal Regulations, title 42, section 435.916 (a).  The 12-month eligibility period begins the month of application.  Beginning July 1, 2017, the commissioner shall adjust the eligibility period for enrollees to implement renewals throughout the year according to guidance from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.  The period of eligibility is the entire calendar year following the year in which eligibility is redetermined.  Eligibility redeterminations shall occur during the open enrollment period for qualified health plans as specified in Code of Federal Regulations, title 45, section 155.410(e)(3).


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(b) Each new period of eligibility must take into account any changes in circumstances that impact eligibility and premium amount.  Coverage begins as provided in section 256L.06.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective the day following final enactment.

 

Sec. 22.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 295.53, subdivision 1, is amended to read:

 

Subdivision 1.  Exclusions and exemptions.  (a) The following payments are excluded from the gross revenues subject to the hospital, surgical center, or health care provider taxes under sections 295.50 to 295.59:

 

(1) payments received by a health care provider or the wholly owned subsidiary of a health care provider for care provided outside Minnesota;

 

(2) government payments received by the commissioner of human services for state-operated services;

 

(3) payments received by a health care provider for hearing aids and related equipment or prescription eyewear delivered outside of Minnesota; and

 

(4) payments received by an educational institution from student tuition, student activity fees, health care service fees, government appropriations, donations, or grants, and for services identified in and provided under an individualized education program as defined in section 256B.0625 or Code of Federal Regulations, chapter 34, section 300.340(a).  Fee for service payments and payments for extended coverage are taxable.

 

(b) The following payments are exempted from the gross revenues subject to hospital, surgical center, or health care provider taxes under sections 295.50 to 295.59:

 

(1) payments received for services provided under the Medicare program, including payments received from the government and organizations governed by sections 1833, 1853, and 1876 of title XVIII of the federal Social Security Act, United States Code, title 42, section 1395; and enrollee deductibles, co-insurance, and co-payments, whether paid by the Medicare enrollee, by Medicare supplemental coverage as described in section 62A.011, subdivision 3, clause (10), or by Medicaid payments under title XIX of the federal Social Security Act.  Payments for services not covered by Medicare are taxable;

 

(2) payments received for home health care services;

 

(3) payments received from hospitals or surgical centers for goods and services on which liability for tax is imposed under section 295.52 or the source of funds for the payment is exempt under clause (1), (6), (9), (10), or (11);

 

(4) payments received from the health care providers for goods and services on which liability for tax is imposed under this chapter or the source of funds for the payment is exempt under clause (1), (6), (9), (10), or (11);

 

(5) amounts paid for legend drugs to a wholesale drug distributor who is subject to tax under section 295.52, subdivision 3, reduced by reimbursement received for legend drugs otherwise exempt under this chapter;

 

(6) payments received from the chemical dependency fund under chapter 254B;

 

(7) payments received in the nature of charitable donations that are not designated for providing patient services to a specific individual or group;

 

(8) payments received for providing patient services incurred through a formal program of health care research conducted in conformity with federal regulations governing research on human subjects.  Payments received from patients or from other persons paying on behalf of the patients are subject to tax;


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(9) payments received from any governmental agency for services benefiting the public, not including payments made by the government in its capacity as an employer or insurer or payments made by the government for services provided under the MinnesotaCare program or the medical assistance program governed by title XIX of the federal Social Security Act, United States Code, title 42, sections 1396 to 1396v;

 

(10) payments received under the federal Employees Health Benefits Act, United States Code, title 5, section 8909(f), as amended by the Omnibus Reconciliation Act of 1990.  Enrollee deductibles, co-insurance, and co‑payments are subject to tax;

 

(11) payments received under the federal Tricare program, Code of Federal Regulations, title 32, section 199.17(a)(7).  Enrollee deductibles, co-insurance, and co-payments are subject to tax; and

 

(12) supplemental or, enhanced, or uniform adjustment factor payments authorized under section 256B.196 or, 256B.197, or 256B.1973.

 

(c) Payments received by wholesale drug distributors for legend drugs sold directly to veterinarians or veterinary bulk purchasing organizations are excluded from the gross revenues subject to the wholesale drug distributor tax under sections 295.50 to 295.59.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective for taxable years beginning after December 31, 2021.

 

Sec. 23.  DIRECTION TO THE COMMISSIONER OF HUMAN SERVICES; FUNDING FOR RECUPERATIVE CARE.

 

The commissioner of human services shall develop a medical assistance reimbursable recuperative care service, not limited to a health home model, designed to serve individuals with chronic conditions, as defined in United States Code, title 42, section 1396w-4(h), who also lack a permanent place of residence at the time of discharge from an emergency department or hospital in order to prevent a return to the emergency department, readmittance to the hospital, or hospitalization.  This section is contingent on the receipt of nonstate funding to the commissioner of human services for this purpose as permitted by Minnesota Statutes, section 256.01, subdivision 25.

 

Sec. 24.  REVISOR INSTRUCTION.

 

The revisor of statutes must change the term "Health Services Policy Committee" to "Health Services Advisory Council" wherever the term appears in Minnesota Statutes and may make any necessary changes to grammar or sentence structure to preserve the meaning of the text.

 

ARTICLE 2

DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES

LICENSING AND BACKGROUND STUDIES

 

Section 1.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 245A.043, subdivision 3, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 3.  Change of ownership process.  (a) When a change in ownership is proposed and the party intends to assume operation without an interruption in service longer than 60 days after acquiring the program or service, the license holder must provide the commissioner with written notice of the proposed change on a form provided by the commissioner at least 60 days before the anticipated date of the change in ownership.  For purposes of this subdivision and subdivision 4, "party" means the party that intends to operate the service or program.

 

(b) The party must submit a license application under this chapter on the form and in the manner prescribed by the commissioner at least 30 days before the change in ownership is complete, and must include documentation to support the upcoming change.  The party must comply with background study requirements under chapter 245C and


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shall pay the application fee required under section 245A.10.  A party that intends to assume operation without an interruption in service longer than 60 days after acquiring the program or service is exempt from the requirements of Minnesota Rules, part 9530.6800 sections 245G.03, subdivision 2, paragraph (b), and 254B.03, subdivision 2, paragraphs (d) and (e).

 

(c) The commissioner may streamline application procedures when the party is an existing license holder under this chapter and is acquiring a program licensed under this chapter or service in the same service class as one or more licensed programs or services the party operates and those licenses are in substantial compliance.  For purposes of this subdivision, "substantial compliance" means within the previous 12 months the commissioner did not (1) issue a sanction under section 245A.07 against a license held by the party, or (2) make a license held by the party conditional according to section 245A.06.

 

(d) Except when a temporary change in ownership license is issued pursuant to subdivision 4, the existing license holder is solely responsible for operating the program according to applicable laws and rules until a license under this chapter is issued to the party.

 

(e) If a licensing inspection of the program or service was conducted within the previous 12 months and the existing license holder's license record demonstrates substantial compliance with the applicable licensing requirements, the commissioner may waive the party's inspection required by section 245A.04, subdivision 4.  The party must submit to the commissioner (1) proof that the premises was inspected by a fire marshal or that the fire marshal deemed that an inspection was not warranted, and (2) proof that the premises was inspected for compliance with the building code or that no inspection was deemed warranted.

 

(f) If the party is seeking a license for a program or service that has an outstanding action under section 245A.06 or 245A.07, the party must submit a letter as part of the application process identifying how the party has or will come into full compliance with the licensing requirements.

 

(g) The commissioner shall evaluate the party's application according to section 245A.04, subdivision 6.  If the commissioner determines that the party has remedied or demonstrates the ability to remedy the outstanding actions under section 245A.06 or 245A.07 and has determined that the program otherwise complies with all applicable laws and rules, the commissioner shall issue a license or conditional license under this chapter.  The conditional license remains in effect until the commissioner determines that the grounds for the action are corrected or no longer exist.

 

(h) The commissioner may deny an application as provided in section 245A.05.  An applicant whose application was denied by the commissioner may appeal the denial according to section 245A.05.

 

(i) This subdivision does not apply to a licensed program or service located in a home where the license holder resides.

 

Sec. 2.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 245F.04, subdivision 2, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 2.  Contents of application.  Prior to the issuance of a license, an applicant must submit, on forms provided by the commissioner, documentation demonstrating the following:

 

(1) compliance with this section;

 

(2) compliance with applicable building, fire, and safety codes; health rules; zoning ordinances; and other applicable rules and regulations or documentation that a waiver has been granted.  The granting of a waiver does not constitute modification of any requirement of this section; and

 

(3) completion of an assessment of need for a new or expanded program as required by Minnesota Rules, part 9530.6800; and


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(4) (3) insurance coverage, including bonding, sufficient to cover all patient funds, property, and interests.

 

Sec. 3.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 245G.03, subdivision 2, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 2.  Application.  (a) Before the commissioner issues a license, an applicant must submit, on forms provided by the commissioner, any documents the commissioner requires.

 

(b) The applicant must submit documentation that the applicant has notified the county as required under section 254B.03, subdivision 2.

 

Sec. 4.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 254B.03, subdivision 2, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 2.  Chemical dependency fund payment.  (a) Payment from the chemical dependency fund is limited to payments for services other than detoxification licensed under Minnesota Rules, parts 9530.6510 to 9530.6590, that, if located outside of federally recognized tribal lands, would be required to be licensed by the commissioner as a chemical dependency treatment or rehabilitation program under sections 245A.01 to 245A.16, and services other than detoxification provided in another state that would be required to be licensed as a chemical dependency program if the program were in the state.  Out of state vendors must also provide the commissioner with assurances that the program complies substantially with state licensing requirements and possesses all licenses and certifications required by the host state to provide chemical dependency treatment.  Vendors receiving payments from the chemical dependency fund must not require co-payment from a recipient of benefits for services provided under this subdivision.  The vendor is prohibited from using the client's public benefits to offset the cost of services paid under this section.  The vendor shall not require the client to use public benefits for room or board costs.  This includes but is not limited to cash assistance benefits under chapters 119B, 256D, and 256J, or SNAP benefits.  Retention of SNAP benefits is a right of a client receiving services through the consolidated chemical dependency treatment fund or through state contracted managed care entities.  Payment from the chemical dependency fund shall be made for necessary room and board costs provided by vendors meeting the criteria under section 254B.05, subdivision 1a, or in a community hospital licensed by the commissioner of health according to sections 144.50 to 144.56 to a client who is:

 

(1) determined to meet the criteria for placement in a residential chemical dependency treatment program according to rules adopted under section 254A.03, subdivision 3; and

 

(2) concurrently receiving a chemical dependency treatment service in a program licensed by the commissioner and reimbursed by the chemical dependency fund.

 

(b) A county may, from its own resources, provide chemical dependency services for which state payments are not made.  A county may elect to use the same invoice procedures and obtain the same state payment services as are used for chemical dependency services for which state payments are made under this section if county payments are made to the state in advance of state payments to vendors.  When a county uses the state system for payment, the commissioner shall make monthly billings to the county using the most recent available information to determine the anticipated services for which payments will be made in the coming month.  Adjustment of any overestimate or underestimate based on actual expenditures shall be made by the state agency by adjusting the estimate for any succeeding month.

 

(c) The commissioner shall coordinate chemical dependency services and determine whether there is a need for any proposed expansion of chemical dependency treatment services.  The commissioner shall deny vendor certification to any provider that has not received prior approval from the commissioner for the creation of new programs or the expansion of existing program capacity.  The commissioner shall consider the provider's capacity to obtain clients from outside the state based on plans, agreements, and previous utilization history, when determining the need for new treatment services.


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(d) At least 60 days prior to submitting an application for new licensure under chapter 245G, the applicant must notify the county human services director in writing of the applicant's intent to open a new treatment program.  The written notification must include, at a minimum:

 

(1) a description of the proposed treatment program; and

 

(2) a description of the target population to be served by the treatment program.

 

(e) The county human services director may submit a written statement to the commissioner, within 60 days of receiving notice from the applicant, regarding the county's support of or opposition to the opening of the new treatment program.  The written statement must include documentation of the rationale for the county's determination.  The commissioner shall consider the county's written statement when determining whether there is a need for the treatment program as required by paragraph (c).

 

Sec. 5.  REPEALER.

 

Minnesota Rules, parts 9530.6800; and 9530.6810, are repealed.

 

ARTICLE 3

HEALTH DEPARTMENT

 

Section 1.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 62J.495, subdivision 3, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 3.  Interoperable electronic health record requirements.  (a) Hospitals and health care providers must meet the following criteria when implementing an interoperable electronic health records system within their hospital system or clinical practice setting.

 

(b) The electronic health record must be a qualified electronic health record.

 

(c) The electronic health record must be certified by the Office of the National Coordinator pursuant to the HITECH Act.  This criterion only applies to hospitals and health care providers if a certified electronic health record product for the provider's particular practice setting is available.  This criterion shall be considered met if a hospital or health care provider is using an electronic health records system that has been certified within the last three years, even if a more current version of the system has been certified within the three-year period.

 

(d) The electronic health record must meet the standards established according to section 3004 of the HITECH Act as applicable.

 

(e) The electronic health record must have the ability to generate information on clinical quality measures and other measures reported under sections 4101, 4102, and 4201 of the HITECH Act.

 

(f) The electronic health record system must be connected to a state-certified health information organization either directly or through a connection facilitated by a state-certified health data intermediary as defined in section 62J.498.

 

(g) A health care provider who is a prescriber or dispenser of legend drugs must have an electronic health record system that meets the requirements of section 62J.497.


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Sec. 2.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 62J.498, is amended to read:

 

62J.498 HEALTH INFORMATION EXCHANGE.

 

Subdivision 1.  Definitions.  (a) The following definitions apply to sections 62J.498 to 62J.4982:

 

(b) "Clinical data repository" means a real time database that consolidates data from a variety of clinical sources to present a unified view of a single patient and is used by a state-certified health information exchange service provider to enable health information exchange among health care providers that are not related health care entities as defined in section 144.291, subdivision 2, paragraph (k).  This does not include clinical data that are submitted to the commissioner for public health purposes required or permitted by law, including any rules adopted by the commissioner.

 

(c) "Clinical transaction" means any meaningful use transaction or other health information exchange transaction that is not covered by section 62J.536.

 

(d) "Commissioner" means the commissioner of health.

 

(e) "Health care provider" or "provider" means a health care provider or provider as defined in section 62J.03, subdivision 8.

 

(f) "Health data intermediary" means an entity that provides the technical capabilities or related products and services to enable health information exchange among health care providers that are not related health care entities as defined in section 144.291, subdivision 2, paragraph (k).  This includes but is not limited to health information service providers (HISP), electronic health record vendors, and pharmaceutical electronic data intermediaries as defined in section 62J.495.

 

(g) "Health information exchange" means the electronic transmission of health-related information between organizations according to nationally recognized standards.

 

(h) "Health information exchange service provider" means a health data intermediary or health information organization.

 

(i) "Health information organization" means an organization that oversees, governs, and facilitates health information exchange among health care providers that are not related health care entities as defined in section 144.291, subdivision 2, paragraph (k), to improve coordination of patient care and the efficiency of health care delivery.

 

(j) "HITECH Act" means the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act as defined in section 62J.495.

 

(k) (j) "Major participating entity" means:

 

(1) a participating entity that receives compensation for services that is greater than 30 percent of the health information organization's gross annual revenues from the health information exchange service provider;

 

(2) a participating entity providing administrative, financial, or management services to the health information organization, if the total payment for all services provided by the participating entity exceeds three percent of the gross revenue of the health information organization; and

 

(3) a participating entity that nominates or appoints 30 percent or more of the board of directors or equivalent governing body of the health information organization.


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(l) (k) "Master patient index" means an electronic database that holds unique identifiers of patients registered at a care facility and is used by a state-certified health information exchange service provider to enable health information exchange among health care providers that are not related health care entities as defined in section 144.291, subdivision 2, paragraph (k).  This does not include data that are submitted to the commissioner for public health purposes required or permitted by law, including any rules adopted by the commissioner.

 

(m) "Meaningful use" means use of certified electronic health record technology to improve quality, safety, and efficiency and reduce health disparities; engage patients and families; improve care coordination and population and public health; and maintain privacy and security of patient health information as established by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and the Minnesota Department of Human Services pursuant to sections 4101, 4102, and 4201 of the HITECH Act.

 

(n) "Meaningful use transaction" means an electronic transaction that a health care provider must exchange to receive Medicare or Medicaid incentives or avoid Medicare penalties pursuant to sections 4101, 4102, and 4201 of the HITECH Act.

 

(o) (l) "Participating entity" means any of the following persons, health care providers, companies, or other organizations with which a health information organization or health data intermediary has contracts or other agreements for the provision of health information exchange services:

 

(1) a health care facility licensed under sections 144.50 to 144.56, a nursing home licensed under sections 144A.02 to 144A.10, and any other health care facility otherwise licensed under the laws of this state or registered with the commissioner;

 

(2) a health care provider, and any other health care professional otherwise licensed under the laws of this state or registered with the commissioner;

 

(3) a group, professional corporation, or other organization that provides the services of individuals or entities identified in clause (2), including but not limited to a medical clinic, a medical group, a home health care agency, an urgent care center, and an emergent care center;

 

(4) a health plan as defined in section 62A.011, subdivision 3; and

 

(5) a state agency as defined in section 13.02, subdivision 17.

 

(p) (m) "Reciprocal agreement" means an arrangement in which two or more health information exchange service providers agree to share in-kind services and resources to allow for the pass-through of clinical transactions.

 

(q) "State-certified health data intermediary" means a health data intermediary that has been issued a certificate of authority to operate in Minnesota.

 

(r) (n) "State-certified health information organization" means a health information organization that has been issued a certificate of authority to operate in Minnesota.

 

Subd. 2.  Health information exchange oversight.  (a) The commissioner shall protect the public interest on matters pertaining to health information exchange.  The commissioner shall:

 

(1) review and act on applications from health data intermediaries and health information organizations for certificates of authority to operate in Minnesota;

 

(2) require information to be provided as needed from health information exchange service providers in order to meet requirements established under sections 62J.498 to 62J.4982;


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(2) (3) provide ongoing monitoring to ensure compliance with criteria established under sections 62J.498 to 62J.4982;

 

(3) (4) respond to public complaints related to health information exchange services;

 

(4) (5) take enforcement actions as necessary, including the imposition of fines, suspension, or revocation of certificates of authority as outlined in section 62J.4982;

 

(5) (6) provide a biennial report on the status of health information exchange services that includes but is not limited to:

 

(i) recommendations on actions necessary to ensure that health information exchange services are adequate to meet the needs of Minnesota citizens and providers statewide;

 

(ii) recommendations on enforcement actions to ensure that health information exchange service providers act in the public interest without causing disruption in health information exchange services;

 

(iii) recommendations on updates to criteria for obtaining certificates of authority under this section; and

 

(iv) recommendations on standard operating procedures for health information exchange, including but not limited to the management of consumer preferences; and

 

(6) (7) other duties necessary to protect the public interest.

 

(b) As part of the application review process for certification under paragraph (a), prior to issuing a certificate of authority, the commissioner shall:

 

(1) make all portions of the application classified as public data available to the public for at least ten days while an application is under consideration.  At the request of the commissioner, the applicant shall participate in a public hearing by presenting an overview of their application and responding to questions from interested parties; and

 

(2) consult with hospitals, physicians, and other providers prior to issuing a certificate of authority.

 

(c) When the commissioner is actively considering a suspension or revocation of a certificate of authority as described in section 62J.4982, subdivision 3, all investigatory data that are collected, created, or maintained related to the suspension or revocation are classified as confidential data on individuals and as protected nonpublic data in the case of data not on individuals.

 

(d) The commissioner may disclose data classified as protected nonpublic or confidential under paragraph (c) if disclosing the data will protect the health or safety of patients.

 

(e) After the commissioner makes a final determination regarding a suspension or revocation of a certificate of authority, all minutes, orders for hearing, findings of fact, conclusions of law, and the specification of the final disciplinary action, are classified as public data.

 

Sec. 3.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 62J.4981, is amended to read:

 

62J.4981 CERTIFICATE OF AUTHORITY TO PROVIDE HEALTH INFORMATION EXCHANGE SERVICES.

 

Subdivision 1.  Authority to require organizations to apply.  The commissioner shall require a health data intermediary or a health information organization to apply for a certificate of authority under this section.  An applicant may continue to operate until the commissioner acts on the application.  If the application is denied, the applicant is considered a health information exchange service provider whose certificate of authority has been revoked under section 62J.4982, subdivision 2, paragraph (d).


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Subd. 2.  Certificate of authority for health data intermediaries.  (a) A health data intermediary must be certified by the state and comply with requirements established in this section.

 

(b) Notwithstanding any law to the contrary, any corporation organized to do so may apply to the commissioner for a certificate of authority to establish and operate as a health data intermediary in compliance with this section.  No person shall establish or operate a health data intermediary in this state, nor sell or offer to sell, or solicit offers to purchase or receive advance or periodic consideration in conjunction with a health data intermediary contract unless the organization has a certificate of authority or has an application under active consideration under this section.

 

(c) In issuing the certificate of authority, the commissioner shall determine whether the applicant for the certificate of authority has demonstrated that the applicant meets the following minimum criteria:

 

(1) hold reciprocal agreements with at least one state-certified health information organization to access patient data, and for the transmission and receipt of clinical transactions.  Reciprocal agreements must meet the requirements established in subdivision 5; and

 

(2) participate in statewide shared health information exchange services as defined by the commissioner to support interoperability between state-certified health information organizations and state-certified health data intermediaries.

 

Subd. 3.  Certificate of authority for health information organizations.  (a) A health information organization must obtain a certificate of authority from the commissioner and demonstrate compliance with the criteria in paragraph (c).

 

(b) Notwithstanding any law to the contrary, an organization may apply for a certificate of authority to establish and operate a health information organization under this section.  No person shall establish or operate a health information organization in this state, nor sell or offer to sell, or solicit offers to purchase or receive advance or periodic consideration in conjunction with a health information organization or health information contract unless the organization has a certificate of authority under this section.

 

(c) In issuing the certificate of authority, the commissioner shall determine whether the applicant for the certificate of authority has demonstrated that the applicant meets the following minimum criteria:

 

(1) the entity is a legally established organization;

 

(2) appropriate insurance, including liability insurance, for the operation of the health information organization is in place and sufficient to protect the interest of the public and participating entities;

 

(3) strategic and operational plans address governance, technical infrastructure, legal and policy issues, finance, and business operations in regard to how the organization will expand to support providers in achieving health information exchange goals over time;

 

(4) the entity addresses the parameters to be used with participating entities and other health information exchange service providers for clinical transactions, compliance with Minnesota law, and interstate health information exchange trust agreements;

 

(5) the entity's board of directors or equivalent governing body is composed of members that broadly represent the health information organization's participating entities and consumers;

 

(6) the entity maintains a professional staff responsible to the board of directors or equivalent governing body with the capacity to ensure accountability to the organization's mission;


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(7) the organization is compliant with national certification and accreditation programs designated by the commissioner;

 

(8) the entity maintains the capability to query for patient information based on national standards.  The query capability may utilize a master patient index, clinical data repository, or record locator service as defined in section 144.291, subdivision 2, paragraph (j).  The entity must be compliant with the requirements of section 144.293, subdivision 8, when conducting clinical transactions;

 

(9) the organization demonstrates interoperability with all other state-certified health information organizations using nationally recognized standards;

 

(10) the organization demonstrates compliance with all privacy and security requirements required by state and federal law; and

 

(11) the organization uses financial policies and procedures consistent with generally accepted accounting principles and has an independent audit of the organization's financials on an annual basis.

 

(d) Health information organizations that have obtained a certificate of authority must:

 

(1) meet the requirements established for connecting to the National eHealth Exchange;

 

(2) annually submit strategic and operational plans for review by the commissioner that address:

 

(i) progress in achieving objectives included in previously submitted strategic and operational plans across the following domains:  business and technical operations, technical infrastructure, legal and policy issues, finance, and organizational governance;

 

(ii) plans for ensuring the necessary capacity to support clinical transactions;

 

(iii) approach for attaining financial sustainability, including public and private financing strategies, and rate structures;

 

(iv) rates of adoption, utilization, and transaction volume, and mechanisms to support health information exchange; and

 

(v) an explanation of methods employed to address the needs of community clinics, critical access hospitals, and free clinics in accessing health information exchange services;

 

(3) enter into reciprocal agreements with all other state-certified health information organizations and state‑certified health data intermediaries to enable access to patient data, and for the transmission and receipt of clinical transactions.  Reciprocal agreements must meet the requirements in subdivision 5;

 

(4) participate in statewide shared health information exchange services as defined by the commissioner to support interoperability between state-certified health information organizations and state-certified health data intermediaries; and

 

(5) comply with additional requirements for the certification or recertification of health information organizations that may be established by the commissioner.

 

Subd. 4.  Application for certificate of authority for health information exchange service providers organizations.  (a) Each application for a certificate of authority shall be in a form prescribed by the commissioner and verified by an officer or authorized representative of the applicant.  Each application shall include the following in addition to information described in the criteria in subdivisions 2 and subdivision 3:


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(1) for health information organizations only, a copy of the basic organizational document, if any, of the applicant and of each major participating entity, such as the articles of incorporation, or other applicable documents, and all amendments to it;

 

(2) for health information organizations only, a list of the names, addresses, and official positions of the following:

 

(i) all members of the board of directors or equivalent governing body, and the principal officers and, if applicable, shareholders of the applicant organization; and

 

(ii) all members of the board of directors or equivalent governing body, and the principal officers of each major participating entity and, if applicable, each shareholder beneficially owning more than ten percent of any voting stock of the major participating entity;

 

(3) for health information organizations only, the name and address of each participating entity and the agreed‑upon duration of each contract or agreement if applicable;

 

(4) a copy of each standard agreement or contract intended to bind the participating entities and the health information exchange service provider organization.  Contractual provisions shall be consistent with the purposes of this section, in regard to the services to be performed under the standard agreement or contract, the manner in which payment for services is determined, the nature and extent of responsibilities to be retained by the health information organization, and contractual termination provisions;

 

(5) a statement generally describing the health information exchange service provider organization, its health information exchange contracts, facilities, and personnel, including a statement describing the manner in which the applicant proposes to provide participants with comprehensive health information exchange services;

 

(6) a statement reasonably describing the geographic area or areas to be served and the type or types of participants to be served;

 

(7) a description of the complaint procedures to be used as required under this section;

 

(8) a description of the mechanism by which participating entities will have an opportunity to participate in matters of policy and operation;

 

(9) a copy of any pertinent agreements between the health information organization and insurers, including liability insurers, demonstrating coverage is in place;

 

(10) a copy of the conflict of interest policy that applies to all members of the board of directors or equivalent governing body and the principal officers of the health information organization; and

 

(11) other information as the commissioner may reasonably require to be provided.

 

(b) Within 45 days after the receipt of the application for a certificate of authority, the commissioner shall determine whether or not the application submitted meets the requirements for completion in paragraph (a), and notify the applicant of any further information required for the application to be processed.

 

(c) Within 90 days after the receipt of a complete application for a certificate of authority, the commissioner shall issue a certificate of authority to the applicant if the commissioner determines that the applicant meets the minimum criteria requirements of subdivision 2 for health data intermediaries or subdivision 3 for health information organizations.  If the commissioner determines that the applicant is not qualified, the commissioner shall notify the applicant and specify the reasons for disqualification.


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(d) Upon being granted a certificate of authority to operate as a state-certified health information organization or state-certified health data intermediary, the organization must operate in compliance with the provisions of this section.  Noncompliance may result in the imposition of a fine or the suspension or revocation of the certificate of authority according to section 62J.4982.

 

Subd. 5.  Reciprocal agreements between health information exchange entities organizations.  (a) Reciprocal agreements between two health information organizations or between a health information organization and a health data intermediary must include a fair and equitable model for charges between the entities that:

 

(1) does not impede the secure transmission of clinical transactions;

 

(2) does not charge a fee for the exchange of meaningful use transactions transmitted according to nationally recognized standards where no additional value-added service is rendered to the sending or receiving health information organization or health data intermediary either directly or on behalf of the client;

 

(3) is consistent with fair market value and proportionately reflects the value-added services accessed as a result of the agreement; and

 

(4) prevents health care stakeholders from being charged multiple times for the same service.

 

(b) Reciprocal agreements must include comparable quality of service standards that ensure equitable levels of services.

 

(c) Reciprocal agreements are subject to review and approval by the commissioner.

 

(d) Nothing in this section precludes a state-certified health information organization or state-certified health data intermediary from entering into contractual agreements for the provision of value-added services beyond meaningful use transactions.

 

Sec. 4.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 62J.4982, is amended to read:

 

62J.4982 ENFORCEMENT AUTHORITY; COMPLIANCE.

 

Subdivision 1.  Penalties and enforcement.  (a) The commissioner may, for any violation of statute or rule applicable to a health information exchange service provider organization, levy an administrative penalty in an amount up to $25,000 for each violation.  In determining the level of an administrative penalty, the commissioner shall consider the following factors:

 

(1) the number of participating entities affected by the violation;

 

(2) the effect of the violation on participating entities' access to health information exchange services;

 

(3) if only one participating entity is affected, the effect of the violation on the patients of that entity;

 

(4) whether the violation is an isolated incident or part of a pattern of violations;

 

(5) the economic benefits derived by the health information organization or a health data intermediary by virtue of the violation;

 

(6) whether the violation hindered or facilitated an individual's ability to obtain health care;

 

(7) whether the violation was intentional;


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(8) whether the violation was beyond the direct control of the health information exchange service provider organization;

 

(9) any history of prior compliance with the provisions of this section, including violations;

 

(10) whether and to what extent the health information exchange service provider organization attempted to correct previous violations;

 

(11) how the health information exchange service provider organization responded to technical assistance from the commissioner provided in the context of a compliance effort; and

 

(12) the financial condition of the health information exchange service provider organization including, but not limited to, whether the health information exchange service provider organization had financial difficulties that affected its ability to comply or whether the imposition of an administrative monetary penalty would jeopardize the ability of the health information exchange service provider organization to continue to deliver health information exchange services.

 

The commissioner shall give reasonable notice in writing to the health information exchange service provider organization of the intent to levy the penalty and the reasons for it.  A health information exchange service provider organization may have 15 days within which to contest whether the facts found constitute a violation of sections 62J.4981 and 62J.4982, according to the contested case and judicial review provisions of sections 14.57 to 14.69.

 

(b) If the commissioner has reason to believe that a violation of section 62J.4981 or 62J.4982 has occurred or is likely, the commissioner may confer with the persons involved before commencing action under subdivision 2.  The commissioner may notify the health information exchange service provider organization and the representatives, or other persons who appear to be involved in the suspected violation, to arrange a voluntary conference with the alleged violators or their authorized representatives.  The purpose of the conference is to attempt to learn the facts about the suspected violation and, if it appears that a violation has occurred or is threatened, to find a way to correct or prevent it.  The conference is not governed by any formal procedural requirements, and may be conducted as the commissioner considers appropriate.

 

(c) The commissioner may issue an order directing a health information exchange service provider organization or a representative of a health information exchange service provider organization to cease and desist from engaging in any act or practice in violation of sections 62J.4981 and 62J.4982.

 

(d) Within 20 days after service of the order to cease and desist, a health information exchange service provider organization may contest whether the facts found constitute a violation of sections 62J.4981 and 62J.4982 according to the contested case and judicial review provisions of sections 14.57 to 14.69.

 

(e) In the event of noncompliance with a cease and desist order issued under this subdivision, the commissioner may institute a proceeding to obtain injunctive relief or other appropriate relief in Ramsey County District Court.

 

Subd. 2.  Suspension or revocation of certificates of authority.  (a) The commissioner may suspend or revoke a certificate of authority issued to a health data intermediary or health information organization under section 62J.4981 if the commissioner finds that:

 

(1) the health information exchange service provider organization is operating significantly in contravention of its basic organizational document, or in a manner contrary to that described in and reasonably inferred from any other information submitted under section 62J.4981, unless amendments to the submissions have been filed with and approved by the commissioner;


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(2) the health information exchange service provider organization is unable to fulfill its obligations to furnish comprehensive health information exchange services as required under its health information exchange contract;

 

(3) the health information exchange service provider organization is no longer financially solvent or may not reasonably be expected to meet its obligations to participating entities;

 

(4) the health information exchange service provider organization has failed to implement the complaint system in a manner designed to reasonably resolve valid complaints;

 

(5) the health information exchange service provider organization, or any person acting with its sanction, has advertised or merchandised its services in an untrue, misleading, deceptive, or unfair manner;

 

(6) the continued operation of the health information exchange service provider organization would be hazardous to its participating entities or the patients served by the participating entities; or

 

(7) the health information exchange service provider organization has otherwise failed to substantially comply with section 62J.4981 or with any other statute or administrative rule applicable to health information exchange service providers, or has submitted false information in any report required under sections 62J.498 to 62J.4982.

 

(b) A certificate of authority shall be suspended or revoked only after meeting the requirements of subdivision 3.

 

(c) If the certificate of authority of a health information exchange service provider organization is suspended, the health information exchange service provider organization shall not, during the period of suspension, enroll any additional participating entities, and shall not engage in any advertising or solicitation.

 

(d) If the certificate of authority of a health information exchange service provider organization is revoked, the organization shall proceed, immediately following the effective date of the order of revocation, to wind up its affairs, and shall conduct no further business except as necessary to the orderly conclusion of the affairs of the organization.  The organization shall engage in no further advertising or solicitation.  The commissioner may, by written order, permit further operation of the organization as the commissioner finds to be in the best interest of participating entities, to the end that participating entities will be given the greatest practical opportunity to access continuing health information exchange services.

 

Subd. 3.  Denial, suspension, and revocation; administrative procedures.  (a) When the commissioner has cause to believe that grounds for the denial, suspension, or revocation of a certificate of authority exist, the commissioner shall notify the health information exchange service provider organization in writing stating the grounds for denial, suspension, or revocation and setting a time within 20 days for a hearing on the matter.

 

(b) After a hearing before the commissioner at which the health information exchange service provider organization may respond to the grounds for denial, suspension, or revocation, or upon the failure of the health information exchange service provider organization to appear at the hearing, the commissioner shall take action as deemed necessary and shall issue written findings and mail them to the health information exchange service provider organization.

 

(c) If suspension, revocation, or administrative penalty is proposed according to this section, the commissioner must deliver, or send by certified mail with return receipt requested, to the health information exchange service provider organization written notice of the commissioner's intent to impose a penalty.  This notice of proposed determination must include:

 

(1) a reference to the statutory basis for the penalty;

 

(2) a description of the findings of fact regarding the violations with respect to which the penalty is proposed;


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(3) the nature and amount of the proposed penalty;

 

(4) any circumstances described in subdivision 1, paragraph (a), that were considered in determining the amount of the proposed penalty;

 

(5) instructions for responding to the notice, including a statement of the health information exchange service provider's organization's right to a contested case proceeding and a statement that failure to request a contested case proceeding within 30 calendar days permits the imposition of the proposed penalty; and

 

(6) the address to which the contested case proceeding request must be sent.

 

Subd. 4.  Coordination.  The commissioner shall, to the extent possible, seek the advice of the Minnesota e‑Health Advisory Committee, in the review and update of criteria for the certification and recertification of health information exchange service providers organizations when implementing sections 62J.498 to 62J.4982.

 

Subd. 5.  Fees and monetary penalties.  (a) The commissioner shall assess fees on every health information exchange service provider organization subject to sections 62J.4981 and 62J.4982 as follows:

 

(1) filing an application for certificate of authority to operate as a health information organization, $7,000; and

 

(2) filing an application for certificate of authority to operate as a health data intermediary, $7,000;

 

(3) annual health information organization certificate fee, $7,000; and.

 

(4) annual health data intermediary certificate fee, $7,000.

 

(b) Fees collected under this section shall be deposited in the state treasury and credited to the state government special revenue fund.

 

(c) Administrative monetary penalties imposed under this subdivision shall be credited to an account in the special revenue fund and are appropriated to the commissioner for the purposes of sections 62J.498 to 62J.4982.

 

Sec. 5.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 62J.84, subdivision 3, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 3.  Prescription drug price increases reporting.  (a) Beginning October 1, 2021 January 1, 2022, a drug manufacturer must submit to the commissioner the information described in paragraph (b) for each prescription drug for which the price was $100 or greater for a 30-day supply or for a course of treatment lasting less than 30 days and:

 

(1) for brand name drugs where there is an increase of ten percent or greater in the price over the previous 12‑month period or an increase of 16 percent or greater in the price over the previous 24-month period; and

 

(2) for generic drugs where there is an increase of 50 percent or greater in the price over the previous 12-month period.

 

(b) For each of the drugs described in paragraph (a), the manufacturer shall submit to the commissioner no later than 60 days after the price increase goes into effect, in the form and manner prescribed by the commissioner, the following information, if applicable:

 

(1) the name and price of the drug and the net increase, expressed as a percentage;

 

(2) the factors that contributed to the price increase;


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(3) the name of any generic version of the prescription drug available on the market;

 

(4) the introductory price of the prescription drug when it was approved for marketing by the Food and Drug Administration and the net yearly increase, by calendar year, in the price of the prescription drug during the previous five years;

 

(5) the direct costs incurred by the manufacturer that are associated with the prescription drug, listed separately:

 

(i) to manufacture the prescription drug;

 

(ii) to market the prescription drug, including advertising costs; and

 

(iii) to distribute the prescription drug;

 

(6) the total sales revenue for the prescription drug during the previous 12-month period;

 

(7) the manufacturer's net profit attributable to the prescription drug during the previous 12-month period;

 

(8) the total amount of financial assistance the manufacturer has provided through patient prescription assistance programs, if applicable;

 

(9) any agreement between a manufacturer and another entity contingent upon any delay in offering to market a generic version of the prescription drug;

 

(10) the patent expiration date of the prescription drug if it is under patent;

 

(11) the name and location of the company that manufactured the drug; and

 

(12) if a brand name prescription drug, the ten highest prices paid for the prescription drug during the previous calendar year in any country other than the United States.

 

(c) The manufacturer may submit any documentation necessary to support the information reported under this subdivision.

 

Sec. 6.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 62J.84, subdivision 4, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 4.  New prescription drug price reporting.  (a) Beginning October 1, 2021 January 1, 2022, no later than 60 days after a manufacturer introduces a new prescription drug for sale in the United States that is a new brand name drug with a price that is greater than the tier threshold established by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services for specialty drugs in the Medicare Part D program for a 30-day supply or a new generic or biosimilar drug with a price that is greater than the tier threshold established by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services for specialty drugs in the Medicare Part D program for a 30-day supply and is not at least 15 percent lower than the referenced brand name drug when the generic or biosimilar drug is launched, the manufacturer must submit to the commissioner, in the form and manner prescribed by the commissioner, the following information, if applicable:

 

(1) the price of the prescription drug;

 

(2) whether the Food and Drug Administration granted the new prescription drug a breakthrough therapy designation or a priority review;

 

(3) the direct costs incurred by the manufacturer that are associated with the prescription drug, listed separately:


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(i) to manufacture the prescription drug;

 

(ii) to market the prescription drug, including advertising costs; and

 

(iii) to distribute the prescription drug; and

 

(4) the patent expiration date of the drug if it is under patent.

 

(b) The manufacturer may submit documentation necessary to support the information reported under this subdivision.

 

Sec. 7.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 62J.84, subdivision 5, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 5.  Newly acquired prescription drug price reporting.  (a) Beginning October 1, 2021 January 1, 2022, the acquiring drug manufacturer must submit to the commissioner the information described in paragraph (b) for each newly acquired prescription drug for which the price was $100 or greater for a 30-day supply or for a course of treatment lasting less than 30 days and:

 

(1) for a newly acquired brand name drug where there is an increase of ten percent or greater in the price over the previous 12-month period or an increase of 16 percent or greater in price over the previous 24-month period; and

 

(2) for a newly acquired generic drug where there is an increase of 50 percent or greater in the price over the previous 12-month period.

 

(b) For each of the drugs described in paragraph (a), the acquiring manufacturer shall submit to the commissioner no later than 60 days after the acquiring manufacturer begins to sell the newly acquired drug, in the form and manner prescribed by the commissioner, the following information, if applicable:

 

(1) the price of the prescription drug at the time of acquisition and in the calendar year prior to acquisition;

 

(2) the name of the company from which the prescription drug was acquired, the date acquired, and the purchase price;

 

(3) the year the prescription drug was introduced to market and the price of the prescription drug at the time of introduction;

 

(4) the price of the prescription drug for the previous five years;

 

(5) any agreement between a manufacturer and another entity contingent upon any delay in offering to market a generic version of the manufacturer's drug; and

 

(6) the patent expiration date of the drug if it is under patent.

 

(c) The manufacturer may submit any documentation necessary to support the information reported under this subdivision.

 

Sec. 8.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 62J.84, subdivision 6, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 6.  Public posting of prescription drug price information.  (a) The commissioner shall post on the department's website, or may contract with a private entity or consortium that satisfies the standards of section 62U.04, subdivision 6, to meet this requirement, the following information:


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(1) a list of the prescription drugs reported under subdivisions 3, 4, and 5, and the manufacturers of those prescription drugs; and

 

(2) information reported to the commissioner under subdivisions 3, 4, and 5.

 

(b) The information must be published in an easy-to-read format and in a manner that identifies the information that is disclosed on a per-drug basis and must not be aggregated in a manner that prevents the identification of the prescription drug.

 

(c) The commissioner shall not post to the department's website or a private entity contracting with the commissioner shall not post any information described in this section if the information is not public data under section 13.02, subdivision 8a; or is trade secret information under section 13.37, subdivision 1, paragraph (b); or is trade secret information pursuant to the Defend Trade Secrets Act of 2016, United States Code, title 18, section 1836, as amended.  If a manufacturer believes information should be withheld from public disclosure pursuant to this paragraph, the manufacturer must clearly and specifically identify that information and describe the legal basis in writing when the manufacturer submits the information under this section.  If the commissioner disagrees with the manufacturer's request to withhold information from public disclosure, the commissioner shall provide the manufacturer written notice that the information will be publicly posted 30 days after the date of the notice.

 

(d) If the commissioner withholds any information from public disclosure pursuant to this subdivision, the commissioner shall post to the department's website a report describing the nature of the information and the commissioner's basis for withholding the information from disclosure.

 

(e) To the extent the information required to be posted under this subdivision is collected and made available to the public by another state, by the University of Minnesota, or through an online drug pricing reference and analytical tool, the commissioner may reference the availability of this drug price data from another source including, within existing appropriations, creating the ability of the public to access the data from the source for purposes of meeting the reporting requirements of this subdivision.

 

Sec. 9.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 62J.84, subdivision 9, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 9.  Legislative report.  (a) No later than January 15 of each year, beginning January 15, 2022 May 15, 2022, and by January 15 of each year thereafter, the commissioner shall report to the chairs and ranking minority members of the legislative committees with jurisdiction over commerce and health and human services policy and finance on the implementation of this section, including but not limited to the effectiveness in addressing the following goals:

 

(1) promoting transparency in pharmaceutical pricing for the state and other payers;

 

(2) enhancing the understanding on pharmaceutical spending trends; and

 

(3) assisting the state and other payers in the management of pharmaceutical costs.

 

(b) The report must include a summary of the information submitted to the commissioner under subdivisions 3, 4, and 5.

 

Sec. 10.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 144.05, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

 

Subd. 7.  Expiration of report mandates.  (a) If the submission of a report by the commissioner of health to the legislature is mandated by statute and the enabling legislation does not include a date for the submission of a final report, the mandate to submit the report shall expire in accordance with this section.


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(b) If the mandate requires the submission of an annual report and the mandate was enacted before January 1, 2021, the mandate shall expire on January 1,2023.  If the mandate requires the submission of a biennial or less frequent report and the mandate was enacted before January 1, 2021, the mandate shall expire on January 1, 2024.

 

(c) Any reporting mandate enacted on or after January 1, 2021 shall expire three years after the date of enactment if the mandate requires the submission of an annual report and shall expire five years after the date of enactment if the mandate requires the submission of a biennial or less frequent report, unless the enacting legislation provides for a different expiration date.

 

(d) The commissioner shall submit a list to the chairs and ranking minority members of the legislative committee with jurisdiction over health by February 15 of each year, beginning February 15, 2022, of all reports set to expire during the following calendar year in accordance with this section.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective the day following final enactment.

 

Sec. 11.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 144.1205, subdivision 2, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 2.  Initial and annual fee.  (a) A licensee must pay an initial fee that is equivalent to the annual fee upon issuance of the initial license.

 

(b) A licensee must pay an annual fee at least 60 days before the anniversary date of the issuance of the license.  The annual fee is as follows:

 

 

TYPE

 

 

ANNUAL

LICENSE FEE

Academic broad scope - type A, B, or C

 

$19,920 $25,896

 

Academic broad scope - type B

 

19,920

 

Academic broad scope - type C

 

19,920

 

Academic broad scope - type A, B, or C (4-8 locations)

 

$31,075

 

Academic broad scope - type A, B, or C (9 or more locations)

 

$36,254

 

Medical broad scope - type A

 

19,920 $25,896

 

Medical broad scope- type A (4-8 locations)

 

$31,075

 

Medical broad scope- type A (9 or more locations)

 

$36,254

 

Medical institution - diagnostic and therapeutic

 

3,680

 

Medical - diagnostic, diagnostic and therapeutic, mobile nuclear medicine, eye applicators, high dose rate afterloaders, and medical therapy emerging technologies

 

 

 

$4,784

 

Medical - diagnostic, diagnostic and therapeutic, mobile nuclear medicine, eye applicators, high dose rate afterloaders, and medical therapy emerging technologies (4-8 locations)

 

 

 

$5,740

 

Medical - diagnostic, diagnostic and therapeutic, mobile nuclear medicine, eye applicators, high dose rate afterloaders, and medical therapy emerging technologies (9 or more locations)

 

 

 

$6,697

 

Medical institution - diagnostic (no written directives)

 

3,680

 

Medical private practice - diagnostic and therapeutic

 

3,680

 

Medical private practice - diagnostic (no written directives)

 

3,680

 

Eye applicators

 

3,680

 

Nuclear medical vans

 

3,680

 

High dose rate afterloader

 

3,680

 

Mobile high dose rate afterloader

 

3,680

 


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Medical therapy - other emerging technology

 

3,680

 

Teletherapy

 

8,960 $11,648

 

Gamma knife

 

8,960 $11,648

 

Veterinary medicine

 

2,000 $2,600

 

In vitro testing lab

 

2,000 $2,600

 

Nuclear pharmacy

 

8,800 $11,440

 

Nuclear pharmacy (5 or more locations)

 

$13,728

 

Radiopharmaceutical distribution (10 CFR 32.72)

 

3,840 $4,992

 

Radiopharmaceutical processing and distribution (10 CFR 32.72)

 

8,800 $11,440

 

Radiopharmaceutical processing and distribution (10 CFR 32.72) (5 or more locations)

 

 

$13,728

 

Medical sealed sources - distribution (10 CFR 32.74)

 

3,840 $4,992

 

Medical sealed sources - processing and distribution (10 CFR 32.74)

 

8,800 $11,440

 

Medical sealed sources - processing and distribution (10 CFR 32.74) (5 or more locations)

 

 

$13,728

 

Well logging - sealed sources

 

3,760 $4,888

 

Measuring systems - ( fixed gauge, portable gauge, gas chromatograph, other)

 

2,000 $2,600

 

Measuring systems - portable gauge

 

2,000

 

Measuring systems - (fixed gauge, portable gauge, gas chromatograph, other) (4-8 locations)

 

 

$3,120

 

Measuring systems - (fixed gauge, portable gauge, gas chromatograph, other) (9 or more locations)

 

 

$3,640

 

X-ray fluorescent analyzer

 

1,520 $1,976

 

Measuring systems - gas chromatograph

 

2,000

 

Measuring systems - other

 

2,000

 

Broad scope Manufacturing and distribution - type A broad scope

 

19,920 $25,896

 

Manufacturing and distribution - type A broad scope (4-8 locations)

 

$31,075

 

Manufacturing and distribution - type A broad scope (9 or more locations)

 

$36,254

 

Broad scope Manufacturing and distribution - type B or C broad scope

 

17,600 $22,880

 

Broad scope Manufacturing and distribution - type C

 

17,600

 

Manufacturing and distribution - type B or C broad scope (4-8 locations)

 

$27,456

 

Manufacturing and distribution - type B or C broad scope (9 or more locations)

 

 

$32,032

 

Manufacturing and distribution - other

 

5,280 $6,864

 

Manufacturing and distribution - other (4-8 locations)

 

$8,236

 

Manufacturing and distribution - other (9 or more locations)

 

$9,609

 

Nuclear laundry

 

18,640 $24,232

 

Decontamination services

 

4,960 $6,448

 

Leak test services only

 

2,000 $2,600

 

Instrument calibration service only, less than 100 curies

 

2,000 $2,600

 

Instrument calibration service only, 100 curies or more

 

2,000

 

Service, maintenance, installation, source changes, etc. 

 

4,960 $6,448

 

Waste disposal service, prepackaged only

 

6,000 $7,800

 

Waste disposal

 

8,320 $10,816

 

Distribution - general licensed devices (sealed sources)

 

1,760 $2,288

 

Distribution - general licensed material (unsealed sources)

 

1,120 $1,456

 

Industrial radiography - fixed or temporary location

 

9,840 $12,792

 

Industrial radiography - temporary job sites

 

9,840

 

Industrial radiography - fixed or temporary location (5 or more locations)

 

$16,629

 

Irradiators, self-shielding, less than 10,000 curies

 

2,880 $3,744

 

Irradiators, other, less than 10,000 curies

 

5,360 $6,968

 


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Irradiators, self-shielding, 10,000 curies or more

 

2,880

 

Research and development - type A, B, or C broad scope

 

9,520 $12,376

 

Research and development - type B broad scope

 

9,520

 

Research and development - type C broad scope

 

9,520

 

Research and development - type A, B, or C broad scope (4-8 locations)

 

$14,851

 

Research and development - type A, B, or C broad scope (9 or more locations)

 

 

$17,326

 

Research and development - other

 

4,480 $5,824

 

Storage - no operations

 

2,000 $2,600

 

Source material - shielding

 

584 $759

 

Special nuclear material plutonium - neutron source in device

 

3,680 $4,784

 

Pacemaker by-product and/or special nuclear material - medical (institution)

 

3,680 $4,784

 

Pacemaker by-product and/or special nuclear material - manufacturing and distribution

 

 

5,280 $6,864

 

Accelerator-produced radioactive material

 

3,840 $4,992

 

Nonprofit educational institutions

 

300 $500

 

General license registration

 

150

 

 

Sec. 12.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 144.1205, subdivision 4, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 4.  Initial and renewal application fee.  A licensee must pay an initial and a renewal application fee as follows: according to this subdivision.

 

TYPE

 

APPLICATION FEE

Academic broad scope - type A, B, or C

 

$5,920 $6,808

 

Academic broad scope - type B

 

5,920

 

Academic broad scope - type C

 

5,920

 

Medical broad scope - type A

 

3,920 $4,508

 

Medical - diagnostic, diagnostic and therapeutic, mobile nuclear medicine, eye applicators, high dose rate afterloaders, and medical therapy emerging technologies

 

 

 

$1,748

 

Medical institution - diagnostic and therapeutic

 

1,520

 

Medical institution - diagnostic (no written directives)

 

1,520

 

Medical private practice - diagnostic and therapeutic

 

1,520

 

Medical private practice - diagnostic (no written directives)

 

1,520

 

Eye applicators

 

1,520

 

Nuclear medical vans

 

1,520

 

High dose rate afterloader

 

1,520

 

Mobile high dose rate afterloader

 

1,520

 

Medical therapy - other emerging technology

 

1,520

 

Teletherapy

 

5,520 $6,348

 

Gamma knife

 

5,520 $6,348

 

Veterinary medicine

 

960 $1,104

 

In vitro testing lab

 

960 $1,104

 

Nuclear pharmacy

 

4,880 $5,612

 

Radiopharmaceutical distribution (10 CFR 32.72)

 

2,160 $2,484

 

Radiopharmaceutical processing and distribution (10 CFR 32.72)

 

4,880 $5,612

 

Medical sealed sources - distribution (10 CFR 32.74)

 

2,160 $2,484

 

Medical sealed sources - processing and distribution (10 CFR 32.74)

 

4,880 $5,612

 

Well logging - sealed sources

 

1,600 $1,840

 


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Measuring systems - ( fixed gauge, portable gauge, gas chromatograph, other)

 

960 $1,104

 

Measuring systems - portable gauge

 

960

 

X-ray fluorescent analyzer

 

584 $671

 

Measuring systems - gas chromatograph

 

960

 

Measuring systems - other

 

960

 

Broad scope Manufacturing and distribution - type A, B, and C broad scope

 

5,920 $6,854

 

Broad scope manufacturing and distribution - type B

 

5,920

 

Broad scope manufacturing and distribution - type C

 

5,920

 

Manufacturing and distribution - other

 

2,320 $2,668

 

Nuclear laundry

 

10,080 $11,592

 

Decontamination services

 

2,640 $3,036

 

Leak test services only

 

960 $1,104

 

Instrument calibration service only, less than 100 curies

 

960 $1,104

 

Instrument calibration service only, 100 curies or more

 

960

 

Service, maintenance, installation, source changes, etc. 

 

2,640 $3,036

 

Waste disposal service, prepackaged only

 

2,240 $2,576

 

Waste disposal

 

1,520 $1,748

 

Distribution - general licensed devices (sealed sources)

 

880 $1,012

 

Distribution - general licensed material (unsealed sources)

 

520 $598

 

Industrial radiography - fixed or temporary location

 

2,640 $3,036

 

Industrial radiography - temporary job sites

 

2,640

 

Irradiators, self-shielding, less than 10,000 curies

 

1,440 $1,656

 

Irradiators, other, less than 10,000 curies

 

2,960 $3,404

 

Irradiators, self-shielding, 10,000 curies or more

 

1,440

 

Research and development - type A, B, or C broad scope

 

4,960 $5,704

 

Research and development - type B broad scope

 

4,960

 

Research and development - type C broad scope

 

4,960

 

Research and development - other

 

2,400 $2,760

 

Storage - no operations

 

960 $1,104

 

Source material - shielding

 

136 $156

 

Special nuclear material plutonium - neutron source in device

 

1,200 $1,380

 

Pacemaker by-product and/or special nuclear material - medical (institution)

 

1,200 $1,380

 

Pacemaker by-product and/or special nuclear material - manufacturing and distribution

 

 

2,320 $2,668

 

Accelerator-produced radioactive material

 

4,100 $4,715

 

Nonprofit educational institutions

 

300 $345

 

General license registration

 

0

 

Industrial radiographer certification

 

150

 

 

Sec. 13.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 144.1205, subdivision 8, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 8.  Reciprocity fee.  A licensee submitting an application for reciprocal recognition of a materials license issued by another agreement state or the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission for a period of 180 days or less during a calendar year must pay $1,200 $2,400.  For a period of 181 days or more, the licensee must obtain a license under subdivision 4.

 

Sec. 14.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 144.1205, subdivision 9, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 9.  Fees for license amendments.  A licensee must pay a fee of $300 $600 to amend a license as follows:

 

(1) to amend a license requiring review including, but not limited to, addition of isotopes, procedure changes, new authorized users, or a new radiation safety officer; and or


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(2) to amend a license requiring review and a site visit including, but not limited to, facility move or addition of processes.

 

Sec. 15.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 144.1205, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

 

Subd. 10.  Fees for general license registrations.  A person required to register generally licensed devices according to Minnesota Rules, part 4731.3215, must pay an annual registration fee of $450.

 

Sec. 16.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 144.1481, subdivision 1, is amended to read:

 

Subdivision 1.  Establishment; membership.  The commissioner of health shall establish a 15-member 16‑member Rural Health Advisory Committee.  The committee shall consist of the following members, all of whom must reside outside the seven-county metropolitan area, as defined in section 473.121, subdivision 2:

 

(1) two members from the house of representatives of the state of Minnesota, one from the majority party and one from the minority party;

 

(2) two members from the senate of the state of Minnesota, one from the majority party and one from the minority party;

 

(3) a volunteer member of an ambulance service based outside the seven-county metropolitan area;

 

(4) a representative of a hospital located outside the seven-county metropolitan area;

 

(5) a representative of a nursing home located outside the seven-county metropolitan area;

 

(6) a medical doctor or doctor of osteopathic medicine licensed under chapter 147;

 

(7) a dentist licensed under chapter 150A;

 

(8) a midlevel practitioner;

 

(8) (9) a registered nurse or licensed practical nurse;

 

(9) (10) a licensed health care professional from an occupation not otherwise represented on the committee;

 

(10) (11) a representative of an institution of higher education located outside the seven-county metropolitan area that provides training for rural health care providers; and

 

(11) (12) three consumers, at least one of whom must be an advocate for persons who are mentally ill or developmentally disabled.

 

The commissioner will make recommendations for committee membership.  Committee members will be appointed by the governor.  In making appointments, the governor shall ensure that appointments provide geographic balance among those areas of the state outside the seven-county metropolitan area.  The chair of the committee shall be elected by the members.  The advisory committee is governed by section 15.059, except that the members do not receive per diem compensation.

 

Sec. 17.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 144.1911, subdivision 6, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 6.  International medical graduate primary care residency grant program and revolving account.  (a) The commissioner shall award grants to support primary care residency positions designated for Minnesota immigrant physicians who are willing to serve in rural or underserved areas of the state.  No grant shall exceed


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$150,000 per residency position per year.  Eligible primary care residency grant recipients include accredited family medicine, general surgery, internal medicine, obstetrics and gynecology, psychiatry, and pediatric residency programs.  Eligible primary care residency programs shall apply to the commissioner.  Applications must include the number of anticipated residents to be funded using grant funds and a budget.  Notwithstanding any law to the contrary, funds awarded to grantees in a grant agreement do not lapse until the grant agreement expires.  Before any funds are distributed, a grant recipient shall provide the commissioner with the following:

 

(1) a copy of the signed contract between the primary care residency program and the participating international medical graduate;

 

(2) certification that the participating international medical graduate has lived in Minnesota for at least two years and is certified by the Educational Commission on Foreign Medical Graduates.  Residency programs may also require that participating international medical graduates hold a Minnesota certificate of clinical readiness for residency, once the certificates become available; and

 

(3) verification that the participating international medical graduate has executed a participant agreement pursuant to paragraph (b).

 

(b) Upon acceptance by a participating residency program, international medical graduates shall enter into an agreement with the commissioner to provide primary care for at least five years in a rural or underserved area of Minnesota after graduating from the residency program and make payments to the revolving international medical graduate residency account for five years beginning in their second year of postresidency employment.  Participants shall pay $15,000 or ten percent of their annual compensation each year, whichever is less.

 

(c) A revolving international medical graduate residency account is established as an account in the special revenue fund in the state treasury.  The commissioner of management and budget shall credit to the account appropriations, payments, and transfers to the account.  Earnings, such as interest, dividends, and any other earnings arising from fund assets, must be credited to the account.  Funds in the account are appropriated annually to the commissioner to award grants and administer the grant program established in paragraph (a).  Notwithstanding any law to the contrary, any funds deposited in the account do not expire.  The commissioner may accept contributions to the account from private sector entities subject to the following provisions:

 

(1) the contributing entity may not specify the recipient or recipients of any grant issued under this subdivision;

 

(2) the commissioner shall make public the identity of any private contributor to the account, as well as the amount of the contribution provided; and

 

(3) a contributing entity may not specify that the recipient or recipients of any funds use specific products or services, nor may the contributing entity imply that a contribution is an endorsement of any specific product or service.

 

Sec. 18.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 144.223, is amended to read:

 

144.223 REPORT OF MARRIAGE.

 

Data relating to certificates of marriage registered shall be reported to the state registrar by the local registrar or designee of the county board in each of the 87 registration districts pursuant to the rules of the commissioner.  The information in clause (1) necessary to compile the report shall be furnished by the applicant prior to the issuance of the marriage license.  The report shall contain the following:

 

(1) personal information on bride and groom:


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(i) name;

 

(ii) residence;

 

(iii) date and place of birth;

 

(iv) race;

 

(v) (iv) if previously married, how terminated; and

 

(vi) (v) signature of applicant, date signed, and Social Security number; and

 

(2) information concerning the marriage:

 

(i) date of marriage;

 

(ii) place of marriage; and

 

(iii) civil or religious ceremony.

 

Sec. 19.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 144.225, subdivision 7, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 7.  Certified birth or death record.  (a) The state registrar or local issuance office shall issue a certified birth or death record or a statement of no vital record found to an individual upon the individual's proper completion of an attestation provided by the commissioner and payment of the required fee:

 

(1) to a person who has a tangible interest in the requested vital record.  A person who has a tangible interest is:

 

(i) the subject of the vital record;

 

(ii) a child of the subject;

 

(iii) the spouse of the subject;

 

(iv) a parent of the subject;

 

(v) the grandparent or grandchild of the subject;

 

(vi) if the requested record is a death record, a sibling of the subject;

 

(vii) the party responsible for filing the vital record;

 

(viii) (vii) the legal custodian, guardian or conservator, or health care agent of the subject;

 

(ix) (viii) a personal representative, by sworn affidavit of the fact that the certified copy is required for administration of the estate;

 

(x) (ix) a successor of the subject, as defined in section 524.1-201, if the subject is deceased, by sworn affidavit of the fact that the certified copy is required for administration of the estate;

 

(xi) (x) if the requested record is a death record, a trustee of a trust by sworn affidavit of the fact that the certified copy is needed for the proper administration of the trust;


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(xii) (xi) a person or entity who demonstrates that a certified vital record is necessary for the determination or protection of a personal or property right, pursuant to rules adopted by the commissioner; or

 

(xiii) (xii) an adoption agency in order to complete confidential postadoption searches as required by section 259.83;

 

(2) to any local, state, tribal, or federal governmental agency upon request if the certified vital record is necessary for the governmental agency to perform its authorized duties;

 

(3) to an attorney representing the subject of the vital record or another person listed in clause (1), upon evidence of the attorney's license;

 

(4) pursuant to a court order issued by a court of competent jurisdiction.  For purposes of this section, a subpoena does not constitute a court order; or

 

(5) to a representative authorized by a person under clauses (1) to (4).

 

(b) The state registrar or local issuance office shall also issue a certified death record to an individual described in paragraph (a), clause (1), items (ii) to (viii) (xi), if, on behalf of the individual, a licensed mortician furnishes the registrar with a properly completed attestation in the form provided by the commissioner within 180 days of the time of death of the subject of the death record.  This paragraph is not subject to the requirements specified in Minnesota Rules, part 4601.2600, subpart 5, item B.

 

Sec. 20.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 144G.84, is amended to read:

 

144G.84 SERVICES FOR RESIDENTS WITH DEMENTIA.

 

(a) In addition to the minimum services required in section 144G.41, an assisted living facility with dementia care must also provide the following services:

 

(1) assistance with activities of daily living that address the needs of each resident with dementia due to cognitive or physical limitations.  These services must meet or be in addition to the requirements in the licensing rules for the facility.  Services must be provided in a person-centered manner that promotes resident choice, dignity, and sustains the resident's abilities;

 

(2) nonpharmacological practices that are person-centered and evidence-informed;

 

(3) services to prepare and educate persons living with dementia and their legal and designated representatives about transitions in care and ensuring complete, timely communication between, across, and within settings; and

 

(4) services that provide residents with choices for meaningful engagement with other facility residents and the broader community.

 

(b) Each resident must be evaluated for activities according to the licensing rules of the facility.  In addition, the evaluation must address the following:

 

(1) past and current interests;

 

(2) current abilities and skills;

 

(3) emotional and social needs and patterns;


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(4) physical abilities and limitations;

 

(5) adaptations necessary for the resident to participate; and

 

(6) identification of activities for behavioral interventions.

 

(c) An individualized activity plan must be developed for each resident based on their activity evaluation.  The plan must reflect the resident's activity preferences and needs.

 

(d) A selection of daily structured and non-structured activities must be provided and included on the resident's activity service or care plan as appropriate.  Daily activity options based on resident evaluation may include but are not limited to:

 

(1) occupation or chore related tasks;

 

(2) scheduled and planned events such as entertainment or outings;

 

(3) spontaneous activities for enjoyment or those that may help defuse a behavior;

 

(4) one-to-one activities that encourage positive relationships between residents and staff such as telling a life story, reminiscing, or playing music;

 

(5) spiritual, creative, and intellectual activities;

 

(6) sensory stimulation activities;

 

(7) physical activities that enhance or maintain a resident's ability to ambulate or move; and

 

(8) a resident's individualized activity plan for regular outdoor activities activity.

 

(e) Behavioral symptoms that negatively impact the resident and others in the assisted living facility with dementia care must be evaluated and included on the service or care plan.  The staff must initiate and coordinate outside consultation or acute care when indicated.

 

(f) Support must be offered to family and other significant relationships on a regularly scheduled basis but not less than quarterly.

 

(g) Access to secured outdoor space and walkways that allow residents to enter and return without staff assistance must be provided.  Existing housing with services establishments registered under chapter 144D prior to August 1, 2021, that obtain an assisted living facility license must provide residents with regular access to outdoor space.  A licensee with new construction on or after August 1, 2021, or a new licensee that was not previously registered under chapter 144D prior to August 1, 2021, must provide regular access to secured outdoor space on the premises of the facility.  A resident's access to outdoor space must be in accordance with the resident's documented care plan.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective August 1, 2021.

 

Sec. 21.  [145.87] HOME VISITING FOR PREGNANT WOMEN AND FAMILIES WITH YOUNG CHILDREN.

 

Subdivision 1.  Definitions.  (a) The terms defined in this subdivision apply to this section and have the meanings given them.


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(b) "Evidence-based home visiting program" means a program that:

 

(1) is based on a clear, consistent program or model that is research-based and grounded in relevant, empirically based knowledge;

 

(2) is linked to program-determined outcomes and is associated with a national organization, institution of higher education, or national or state public health institute;

 

(3) has comprehensive home visitation standards that ensure high-quality service delivery and continuous quality improvement;

 

(4) has demonstrated significant, sustained positive outcomes; and

 

(5) either:

 

(i) has been evaluated using rigorous randomized controlled research designs and the evaluation results have been published in a peer-reviewed journal; or

 

(ii) is based on quasi-experimental research using two or more separate, comparable client samples.

 

(c) "Evidence-informed home visiting program" means a program that:

 

(1) has data or evidence demonstrating effectiveness at achieving positive outcomes for pregnant women or young children; and

 

(2) either:

 

(i) has an active evaluation of the program; or

 

(ii) has a plan and timeline for an active evaluation of the program to be conducted.

 

(d) "Health equity" means every individual has a fair opportunity to attain the individual's full health potential and no individual is disadvantaged from achieving this potential.

 

(e) "Promising practice home visiting program" means a program that has shown improvement toward achieving positive outcomes for pregnant women or young children.

 

Subd. 2.  Grants for home visiting programs.  (a) The commissioner of health shall award grants to community health boards, nonprofit organizations, and Tribal nations to start up, sustain, or expand voluntary home visiting programs serving pregnant women or families with young children.  Home visiting programs supported under this section shall provide voluntary home visits by early childhood professionals or health professionals, including but not limited to nurses, social workers, early childhood educators, and trained paraprofessionals.  Grant money shall be used to:

 

(1) establish, sustain, or expand evidence-based, evidence-informed, or promising practice home visiting programs that address health equity and utilize community-driven health strategies;

 

(2) serve families with young children or pregnant women who have high needs or are high-risk, including but not limited to a family with low income, a parent or pregnant woman with a mental illness or a substance use disorder, or a parent or pregnant woman experiencing housing instability or domestic abuse; and

 

(3) improve program outcomes in two or more of the following areas:


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(i) maternal and newborn health;

 

(ii) school readiness and achievement;

 

(iii) family economic self-sufficiency;

 

(iv) coordination and referral for other community resources and supports;

 

(v) reduction in child injuries, abuse, or neglect; or

 

(vi) reduction in crime or domestic violence.

 

(b) Grants awarded to evidence-informed and promising practice home visiting programs must include money to evaluate program outcomes for up to four of the areas listed in paragraph (a), clause (3).

 

Subd. 3.  Grant prioritization.  (a) In awarding grants, the commissioner shall give priority to community health boards, nonprofit organizations, and Tribal nations seeking to expand home visiting services with community or regional partnerships.

 

(b) The commissioner shall allocate at least 75 percent of the grant money awarded each grant cycle to evidence‑based home visiting programs that address health equity and up to 25 percent of the grant money awarded each grant cycle to evidence-informed or promising practice home visiting programs that address health equity and utilize community-driven health strategies.

 

Subd. 4.  Administrative costs.  The commissioner may use up to seven percent of the annual appropriation under this section to provide training and technical assistance and to administer and evaluate the program.  The commissioner may contract for training, capacity-building support for grantees or potential grantees, technical assistance, and evaluation support.

 

Subd. 5.  Use of state general fund appropriations.  Appropriations dedicated to establishing, sustaining, or expanding evidence-based home visiting programs shall, for grants awarded on or after July 1, 2021, be awarded according to this section.  This section shall not govern grant awards of federal funds for home visiting programs and shall not govern grant awards using state general fund appropriations dedicated to establishing or expanding nurse-family partnership home visiting programs.

 

Sec. 22.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 145.893, subdivision 1, is amended to read:

 

Subdivision 1.  Vouchers Food benefits.  An eligible individual shall receive vouchers food benefits for the purchase of specified nutritional supplements in type and quantity approved by the commissioner.  Alternate forms of delivery may be developed by the commissioner in appropriate cases.

 

Sec. 23.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 145.894, is amended to read:

 

145.894 STATE COMMISSIONER OF HEALTH; DUTIES, RESPONSIBILITIES.

 

The commissioner of health shall:

 

(1) develop a comprehensive state plan for the delivery of nutritional supplements to pregnant and lactating women, infants, and children;

 

(2) contract with existing local public or private nonprofit organizations for the administration of the nutritional supplement program;


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(3) develop and implement a public education program promoting the provisions of sections 145.891 to 145.897, and provide for the delivery of individual and family nutrition education and counseling at project sites.  The education programs must include a campaign to promote breast feeding;

 

(4) develop in cooperation with other agencies and vendors a uniform state voucher food benefit system for the delivery of nutritional supplements;

 

(5) authorize local health agencies to issue vouchers bimonthly food benefits trimonthly to some or all eligible individuals served by the agency, provided the agency demonstrates that the federal minimum requirements for providing nutrition education will continue to be met and that the quality of nutrition education and health services provided by the agency will not be adversely impacted;

 

(6) investigate and implement a system to reduce the cost of nutritional supplements and maintain ongoing negotiations with nonparticipating manufacturers and suppliers to maximize cost savings;

 

(7) develop, analyze, and evaluate the health aspects of the nutritional supplement program and establish nutritional guidelines for the program;

 

(8) apply for, administer, and annually expend at least 99 percent of available federal or private funds;

 

(9) aggressively market services to eligible individuals by conducting ongoing outreach activities and by coordinating with and providing marketing materials and technical assistance to local human services and community service agencies and nonprofit service providers;

 

(10) determine, on July 1 of each year, the number of pregnant women participating in each special supplemental food program for women, infants, and children (WIC) and, in 1986, 1987, and 1988, at the commissioner's discretion, designate a different food program deliverer if the current deliverer fails to increase the participation of pregnant women in the program by at least ten percent over the previous year's participation rate;

 

(11) promulgate all rules necessary to carry out the provisions of sections 145.891 to 145.897; and

 

(12) ensure that any state appropriation to supplement the federal program is spent consistent with federal requirements.

 

Sec. 24.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 145.897, is amended to read:

 

145.897 VOUCHERS FOOD BENEFITS.

 

Vouchers Food benefits issued pursuant to sections 145.891 to 145.897 shall be only for the purchase of those foods determined by the commissioner United States Department of Agriculture to be desirable nutritional supplements for pregnant and lactating women, infants and children.  These foods shall include, but not be limited to, iron fortified infant formula, vegetable or fruit juices, cereal, milk, cheese, and eggs.

 

Sec. 25.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 145.899, is amended to read:

 

145.899 WIC VOUCHERS FOOD BENEFITS FOR ORGANICS.

 

Vouchers Food benefits for the special supplemental nutrition program for women, infants, and children (WIC) may be used to purchase cost-neutral organic WIC allowable food.  The commissioner of health shall regularly evaluate the list of WIC allowable food in accordance with federal requirements and shall add to the list any organic WIC allowable foods determined to be cost-neutral.


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Sec. 26.  [145A.145] NURSE-FAMILY PARTNERSHIP PROGRAMS.

 

(a) The commissioner of health shall award expansion grants to community health boards and tribal nations to expand existing nurse-family partnership programs.  Grant funds must be used to start up, expand, or sustain nurse‑family partnership programs in the county, reservation, or region to serve families in accordance with the Nurse-Family Partnership Service Office nurse-family partnership model.  The commissioner shall award grants to community health boards, nonprofit organizations, or tribal nations in metropolitan and rural areas of the state. 

 

(b) Priority for all grants shall be given to nurse-family partnership programs that provide services through a Minnesota health care program-enrolled provider that accepts medical assistance.  Priority for grants to rural areas shall be given to community health boards, nonprofit organizations, and tribal nations that start up, expand, or sustain services within regional partnerships that provide the nurse-family partnership program. 

 

(c) Funding available under this section may only be used to supplement, not to replace, funds being used for nurse-family partnership home visiting services as of June 30, 2015. 

 

Sec. 27.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 151.72, subdivision 5, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 5.  Labeling requirements.  (a) A product regulated under this section must bear a label that contains, at a minimum:

 

(1) the name, location, contact phone number, and website of the manufacturer of the product;

 

(2) the name and address of the independent, accredited laboratory used by the manufacturer to test the product; and

 

(3) an accurate statement of the amount or percentage of cannabinoids found in each unit of the product meant to be consumed; and or

 

(4) instead of the information required in clauses (1) to (3), a scannable bar code or QR code that links to the manufacturer's website.

 

The label must also include a statement stating that this product does not claim to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease and has not been evaluated or approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) unless the product has been so approved.

 

(b) The information required to be on the label must be prominently and conspicuously placed and in terms that can be easily read and understood by the consumer.

 

(c) The label must not contain any claim that the product may be used or is effective for the prevention, treatment, or cure of a disease or that it may be used to alter the structure or function of human or animal bodies, unless the claim has been approved by the FDA.

 

Sec. 28.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 152.22, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

 

Subd. 5c.  Hemp processor.  "Hemp processor" means a person or business licensed by the commissioner of agriculture under chapter 18K to convert raw hemp into a product.

 

Sec. 29.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 152.22, subdivision 6, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 6.  Medical cannabis.  (a) "Medical cannabis" means any species of the genus cannabis plant, or any mixture or preparation of them, including whole plant extracts and resins, and is delivered in the form of:

 

(1) liquid, including, but not limited to, oil;


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(2) pill;

 

(3) vaporized delivery method with use of liquid or oil but which does not require the use of dried leaves or plant form; or;

 

(4) combustion with use of dried raw cannabis; or

 

(4) (5) any other method, excluding smoking, approved by the commissioner.

 

(b) This definition includes any part of the genus cannabis plant prior to being processed into a form allowed under paragraph (a), that is possessed by a person while that person is engaged in employment duties necessary to carry out a requirement under sections 152.22 to 152.37 for a registered manufacturer or a laboratory under contract with a registered manufacturer.  This definition also includes any hemp acquired by a manufacturer by a hemp grower as permitted under section 152.29, subdivision 1, paragraph (b).

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective the earlier of (1) March 1, 2022, or (2) a date, as determined by the commissioner of health, by which (i) the rules adopted or amended under Minnesota Statutes, section 152.26, paragraph (b), are in effect and (ii) the independent laboratories under contract with the manufacturers have the necessary procedures and equipment in place to perform the required testing of dried raw cannabis.  If this section is effective before March 1, 2022, the commissioner shall provide notice of that effective date to the public.

 

Sec. 30.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 152.22, subdivision 11, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 11.  Registered designated caregiver.  "Registered designated caregiver" means a person who:

 

(1) is at least 18 years old;

 

(2) does not have a conviction for a disqualifying felony offense;

 

(3) has been approved by the commissioner to assist a patient who has been identified by a health care practitioner as developmentally or physically disabled and therefore requires assistance in administering medical cannabis or obtaining medical cannabis from a distribution facility due to the disability; and

 

(4) is authorized by the commissioner to assist the patient with the use of medical cannabis.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective the day following final enactment.

 

Sec. 31.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 152.23, is amended to read:

 

152.23 LIMITATIONS.

 

(a) Nothing in sections 152.22 to 152.37 permits any person to engage in and does not prevent the imposition of any civil, criminal, or other penalties for:

 

(1) undertaking any task under the influence of medical cannabis that would constitute negligence or professional malpractice;

 

(2) possessing or engaging in the use of medical cannabis:

 

(i) on a school bus or van;

 

(ii) on the grounds of any preschool or primary or secondary school;


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(iii) in any correctional facility; or

 

(iv) on the grounds of any child care facility or home day care;

 

(3) vaporizing or combusting medical cannabis pursuant to section 152.22, subdivision 6:

 

(i) on any form of public transportation;

 

(ii) where the vapor would be inhaled by a nonpatient minor child or where the smoke would be inhaled by a minor child; or

 

(iii) in any public place, including any indoor or outdoor area used by or open to the general public or a place of employment as defined under section 144.413, subdivision 1b; and

 

(4) operating, navigating, or being in actual physical control of any motor vehicle, aircraft, train, or motorboat, or working on transportation property, equipment, or facilities while under the influence of medical cannabis.

 

(b) Nothing in sections 152.22 to 152.37 require the medical assistance and MinnesotaCare programs to reimburse an enrollee or a provider for costs associated with the medical use of cannabis.  Medical assistance and MinnesotaCare shall continue to provide coverage for all services related to treatment of an enrollee's qualifying medical condition if the service is covered under chapter 256B or 256L.

 

Sec. 32.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 152.26, is amended to read:

 

152.26 RULEMAKING.

 

(a) The commissioner may adopt rules to implement sections 152.22 to 152.37.  Rules for which notice is published in the State Register before January 1, 2015, may be adopted using the process in section 14.389.

 

(b) The commissioner may adopt or amend rules, using the procedure in section 14.386, paragraph (a), to implement the addition of dried raw cannabis as an allowable form of medical cannabis under section 152.22, subdivision 6, paragraph (a), clause (4).  Section 14.386, paragraph (b), does not apply to these rules.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective the day following final enactment.

 

Sec. 33.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 152.27, subdivision 2, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 2.  Commissioner duties.  (a) The commissioner shall:

 

(1) give notice of the program to health care practitioners in the state who are eligible to serve as health care practitioners and explain the purposes and requirements of the program;

 

(2) allow each health care practitioner who meets or agrees to meet the program's requirements and who requests to participate, to be included in the registry program to collect data for the patient registry;

 

(3) provide explanatory information and assistance to each health care practitioner in understanding the nature of therapeutic use of medical cannabis within program requirements;

 

(4) create and provide a certification to be used by a health care practitioner for the practitioner to certify whether a patient has been diagnosed with a qualifying medical condition and include in the certification an option for the practitioner to certify whether the patient, in the health care practitioner's medical opinion, is developmentally or physically disabled and, as a result of that disability, the patient requires assistance in administering medical cannabis or obtaining medical cannabis from a distribution facility;


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(5) supervise the participation of the health care practitioner in conducting patient treatment and health records reporting in a manner that ensures stringent security and record-keeping requirements and that prevents the unauthorized release of private data on individuals as defined by section 13.02;

 

(6) develop safety criteria for patients with a qualifying medical condition as a requirement of the patient's participation in the program, to prevent the patient from undertaking any task under the influence of medical cannabis that would constitute negligence or professional malpractice on the part of the patient; and

 

(7) conduct research and studies based on data from health records submitted to the registry program and submit reports on intermediate or final research results to the legislature and major scientific journals.  The commissioner may contract with a third party to complete the requirements of this clause.  Any reports submitted must comply with section 152.28, subdivision 2.

 

(b) The commissioner may add a delivery method under section 152.22, subdivision 6, or add, remove, or modify a qualifying medical condition under section 152.22, subdivision 14, upon a petition from a member of the public or the task force on medical cannabis therapeutic research or as directed by law.  The commissioner shall evaluate all petitions to add a qualifying medical condition or to remove or modify an existing qualifying medical condition submitted by the task force on medical cannabis therapeutic research or as directed by law and shall may make the addition, removal, or modification if the commissioner determines the addition, removal, or modification is warranted based on the best available evidence and research.  If the commissioner wishes to add a delivery method under section 152.22, subdivision 6, or add or remove a qualifying medical condition under section 152.22, subdivision 14, the commissioner must notify the chairs and ranking minority members of the legislative policy committees having jurisdiction over health and public safety of the addition or removal and the reasons for its addition or removal, including any written comments received by the commissioner from the public and any guidance received from the task force on medical cannabis research, by January 15 of the year in which the commissioner wishes to make the change.  The change shall be effective on August 1 of that year, unless the legislature by law provides otherwise.

 

Sec. 34.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 152.27, subdivision 3, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 3.  Patient application.  (a) The commissioner shall develop a patient application for enrollment into the registry program.  The application shall be available to the patient and given to health care practitioners in the state who are eligible to serve as health care practitioners.  The application must include:

 

(1) the name, mailing address, and date of birth of the patient;

 

(2) the name, mailing address, and telephone number of the patient's health care practitioner;

 

(3) the name, mailing address, and date of birth of the patient's designated caregiver, if any, or the patient's parent, legal guardian, or spouse if the parent, legal guardian, or spouse will be acting as a caregiver;

 

(4) a copy of the certification from the patient's health care practitioner that is dated within 90 days prior to submitting the application which that certifies that the patient has been diagnosed with a qualifying medical condition and, if applicable, that, in the health care practitioner's medical opinion, the patient is developmentally or physically disabled and, as a result of that disability, the patient requires assistance in administering medical cannabis or obtaining medical cannabis from a distribution facility; and

 

(5) all other signed affidavits and enrollment forms required by the commissioner under sections 152.22 to 152.37, including, but not limited to, the disclosure form required under paragraph (c).

 

(b) The commissioner shall require a patient to resubmit a copy of the certification from the patient's health care practitioner on a yearly basis and shall require that the recertification be dated within 90 days of submission.


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(c) The commissioner shall develop a disclosure form and require, as a condition of enrollment, all patients to sign a copy of the disclosure.  The disclosure must include:

 

(1) a statement that, notwithstanding any law to the contrary, the commissioner, or an employee of any state agency, may not be held civilly or criminally liable for any injury, loss of property, personal injury, or death caused by any act or omission while acting within the scope of office or employment under sections 152.22 to 152.37; and

 

(2) the patient's acknowledgment that enrollment in the patient registry program is conditional on the patient's agreement to meet all of the requirements of sections 152.22 to 152.37.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective the day following final enactment.

 

Sec. 35.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 152.27, subdivision 4, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 4.  Registered designated caregiver.  (a) The commissioner shall register a designated caregiver for a patient if the patient's health care practitioner has certified that the patient, in the health care practitioner's medical opinion, is developmentally or physically disabled and, as a result of that disability, the patient requires assistance in administering medical cannabis or obtaining medical cannabis from a distribution facility and the caregiver has agreed, in writing, to be the patient's designated caregiver.  As a condition of registration as a designated caregiver, the commissioner shall require the person to:

 

(1) be at least 18 years of age;

 

(2) agree to only possess the patient's medical cannabis for purposes of assisting the patient; and

 

(3) agree that if the application is approved, the person will not be a registered designated caregiver for more than one patient, unless the six registered patients at one time.  Patients who reside in the same residence shall count as one patient.

 

(b) The commissioner shall conduct a criminal background check on the designated caregiver prior to registration to ensure that the person does not have a conviction for a disqualifying felony offense.  Any cost of the background check shall be paid by the person seeking registration as a designated caregiver.  A designated caregiver must have the criminal background check renewed every two years.

 

(c) Nothing in sections 152.22 to 152.37 shall be construed to prevent a person registered as a designated caregiver from also being enrolled in the registry program as a patient and possessing and using medical cannabis as a patient.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective the day following final enactment.

 

Sec. 36.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 152.28, subdivision 1, is amended to read:

 

Subdivision 1.  Health care practitioner duties.  (a) Prior to a patient's enrollment in the registry program, a health care practitioner shall:

 

(1) determine, in the health care practitioner's medical judgment, whether a patient suffers from a qualifying medical condition, and, if so determined, provide the patient with a certification of that diagnosis;

 

(2) determine whether a patient is developmentally or physically disabled and, as a result of that disability, the patient requires assistance in administering medical cannabis or obtaining medical cannabis from a distribution facility, and, if so determined, include that determination on the patient's certification of diagnosis;


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(3) advise patients, registered designated caregivers, and parents, legal guardians, or spouses who are acting as caregivers of the existence of any nonprofit patient support groups or organizations;

 

(4) (3) provide explanatory information from the commissioner to patients with qualifying medical conditions, including disclosure to all patients about the experimental nature of therapeutic use of medical cannabis; the possible risks, benefits, and side effects of the proposed treatment; the application and other materials from the commissioner; and provide patients with the Tennessen warning as required by section 13.04, subdivision 2; and

 

(5) (4) agree to continue treatment of the patient's qualifying medical condition and report medical findings to the commissioner.

 

(b) Upon notification from the commissioner of the patient's enrollment in the registry program, the health care practitioner shall:

 

(1) participate in the patient registry reporting system under the guidance and supervision of the commissioner;

 

(2) report health records of the patient throughout the ongoing treatment of the patient to the commissioner in a manner determined by the commissioner and in accordance with subdivision 2;

 

(3) determine, on a yearly basis, if the patient continues to suffer from a qualifying medical condition and, if so, issue the patient a new certification of that diagnosis; and

 

(4) otherwise comply with all requirements developed by the commissioner.

 

(c) A health care practitioner may conduct a patient assessment to issue a recertification as required under paragraph (b), clause (3), via telemedicine as defined under section 62A.671, subdivision 9.

 

(d) Nothing in this section requires a health care practitioner to participate in the registry program.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective the day following final enactment.

 

Sec. 37.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 152.29, subdivision 1, is amended to read:

 

Subdivision 1.  Manufacturer; requirements.  (a) A manufacturer may operate eight distribution facilities, which may include the manufacturer's single location for cultivation, harvesting, manufacturing, packaging, and processing but is not required to include that location.  The commissioner shall designate the geographical service areas to be served by each manufacturer based on geographical need throughout the state to improve patient access.  A manufacturer shall not have more than two distribution facilities in each geographical service area assigned to the manufacturer by the commissioner.  A manufacturer shall operate only one location where all cultivation, harvesting, manufacturing, packaging, and processing of medical cannabis shall be conducted.  This location may be one of the manufacturer's distribution facility sites.  The additional distribution facilities may dispense medical cannabis and medical cannabis products but may not contain any medical cannabis in a form other than those forms allowed under section 152.22, subdivision 6, and the manufacturer shall not conduct any cultivation, harvesting, manufacturing, packaging, or processing at the other distribution facility sites.  Any distribution facility operated by the manufacturer is subject to all of the requirements applying to the manufacturer under sections 152.22 to 152.37, including, but not limited to, security and distribution requirements.

 

(b) A manufacturer may acquire hemp grown in this state from a hemp grower, and may acquire hemp products produced by a hemp processor.  A manufacturer may manufacture or process hemp and hemp products into an allowable form of medical cannabis under section 152.22, subdivision 6.  Hemp and hemp products acquired by a manufacturer under this paragraph is are subject to the same quality control program, security and testing requirements, and other requirements that apply to medical cannabis under sections 152.22 to 152.37 and Minnesota Rules, chapter 4770.


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(c) A medical cannabis manufacturer shall contract with a laboratory approved by the commissioner, subject to any additional requirements set by the commissioner, for purposes of testing medical cannabis manufactured or hemp or hemp products acquired by the medical cannabis manufacturer as to content, contamination, and consistency to verify the medical cannabis meets the requirements of section 152.22, subdivision 6.  The cost of laboratory testing shall be paid by the manufacturer.

 

(d) The operating documents of a manufacturer must include:

 

(1) procedures for the oversight of the manufacturer and procedures to ensure accurate record keeping;

 

(2) procedures for the implementation of appropriate security measures to deter and prevent the theft of medical cannabis and unauthorized entrance into areas containing medical cannabis; and

 

(3) procedures for the delivery and transportation of hemp between hemp growers and manufacturers and for the delivery and transportation of hemp products between hemp processors and manufacturers.

 

(e) A manufacturer shall implement security requirements, including requirements for the delivery and transportation of hemp and hemp products, protection of each location by a fully operational security alarm system, facility access controls, perimeter intrusion detection systems, and a personnel identification system.

 

(f) A manufacturer shall not share office space with, refer patients to a health care practitioner, or have any financial relationship with a health care practitioner.

 

(g) A manufacturer shall not permit any person to consume medical cannabis on the property of the manufacturer.

 

(h) A manufacturer is subject to reasonable inspection by the commissioner.

 

(i) For purposes of sections 152.22 to 152.37, a medical cannabis manufacturer is not subject to the Board of Pharmacy licensure or regulatory requirements under chapter 151.

 

(j) A medical cannabis manufacturer may not employ any person who is under 21 years of age or who has been convicted of a disqualifying felony offense.  An employee of a medical cannabis manufacturer must submit a completed criminal history records check consent form, a full set of classifiable fingerprints, and the required fees for submission to the Bureau of Criminal Apprehension before an employee may begin working with the manufacturer.  The bureau must conduct a Minnesota criminal history records check and the superintendent is authorized to exchange the fingerprints with the Federal Bureau of Investigation to obtain the applicant's national criminal history record information.  The bureau shall return the results of the Minnesota and federal criminal history records checks to the commissioner.

 

(k) A manufacturer may not operate in any location, whether for distribution or cultivation, harvesting, manufacturing, packaging, or processing, within 1,000 feet of a public or private school existing before the date of the manufacturer's registration with the commissioner.

 

(l) A manufacturer shall comply with reasonable restrictions set by the commissioner relating to signage, marketing, display, and advertising of medical cannabis.

 

(m) Before a manufacturer acquires hemp from a hemp grower or hemp products from a hemp processor, the manufacturer must verify that the hemp grower or hemp processor has a valid license issued by the commissioner of agriculture under chapter 18K.


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(n) Until a state-centralized, seed-to-sale system is implemented that can track a specific medical cannabis plant from cultivation through testing and point of sale, the commissioner shall conduct at least one unannounced inspection per year of each manufacturer that includes inspection of:

 

(1) business operations;

 

(2) physical locations of the manufacturer's manufacturing facility and distribution facilities;

 

(3) financial information and inventory documentation, including laboratory testing results; and

 

(4) physical and electronic security alarm systems.

 

Sec. 38.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 152.29, subdivision 3, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 3.  Manufacturer; distribution.  (a) A manufacturer shall require that employees licensed as pharmacists pursuant to chapter 151 be the only employees to give final approval for the distribution of medical cannabis to a patient.  A manufacturer may transport medical cannabis or medical cannabis products that have been cultivated, harvested, manufactured, packaged, and processed by that manufacturer to another registered manufacturer for the other manufacturer to distribute.

 

(b) A manufacturer may distribute medical cannabis products, whether or not the products have been manufactured by that manufacturer.

 

(c) Prior to distribution of any medical cannabis, the manufacturer shall:

 

(1) verify that the manufacturer has received the registry verification from the commissioner for that individual patient;

 

(2) verify that the person requesting the distribution of medical cannabis is the patient, the patient's registered designated caregiver, or the patient's parent, legal guardian, or spouse listed in the registry verification using the procedures described in section 152.11, subdivision 2d;

 

(3) assign a tracking number to any medical cannabis distributed from the manufacturer;

 

(4) ensure that any employee of the manufacturer licensed as a pharmacist pursuant to chapter 151 has consulted with the patient to determine the proper dosage for the individual patient after reviewing the ranges of chemical compositions of the medical cannabis and the ranges of proper dosages reported by the commissioner.  For purposes of this clause, a consultation may be conducted remotely using a by secure videoconference, telephone, or other remote means, so long as the employee providing the consultation is able to confirm the identity of the patient, the consultation occurs while the patient is at a distribution facility, and the consultation adheres to patient privacy requirements that apply to health care services delivered through telemedicine.  A pharmacist consultation under this clause is not required when a manufacturer is distributing medical cannabis to a patient according to a patient‑specific dosage plan established with that manufacturer and is not modifying the dosage or product being distributed under that plan and the medical cannabis is distributed by a pharmacy technician;

 

(5) properly package medical cannabis in compliance with the United States Poison Prevention Packing Act regarding child-resistant packaging and exemptions for packaging for elderly patients, and label distributed medical cannabis with a list of all active ingredients and individually identifying information, including:

 

(i) the patient's name and date of birth;

 

(ii) the name and date of birth of the patient's registered designated caregiver or, if listed on the registry verification, the name of the patient's parent or legal guardian, if applicable;


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(iii) the patient's registry identification number;

 

(iv) the chemical composition of the medical cannabis; and

 

(v) the dosage; and

 

(6) ensure that the medical cannabis distributed contains a maximum of a 90-day supply of the dosage determined for that patient.

 

(d) A manufacturer shall require any employee of the manufacturer who is transporting medical cannabis or medical cannabis products to a distribution facility or to another registered manufacturer to carry identification showing that the person is an employee of the manufacturer.

 

(e) A manufacturer shall distribute medical cannabis in dried raw cannabis form only to a patient age 21 or older, or to the registered designated caregiver, parent, legal guardian, or spouse of a patient age 21 or older.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  Paragraph (c) is effective the day following final enactment.  Paragraph (e) is effective the earlier of (1) March 1, 2022, or (2) a date, as determined by the commissioner of health, by which (i) the rules adopted or amended under Minnesota Statutes, section 152.26, paragraph (b), are in effect and (ii) the independent laboratories under contract with the manufacturers have the necessary procedures and equipment in place to perform the required testing of dried raw cannabis.  If paragraph (e) is effective before March 1, 2022, the commissioner shall provide notice of that effective date to the public.

 

Sec. 39.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 152.29, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

 

Subd. 3b.  Distribution to recipient in a motor vehicle.  A manufacturer may distribute medical cannabis to a patient, registered designated caregiver, or parent, legal guardian, or spouse of a patient who is at the distribution facility but remains in a motor vehicle, provided:

 

(1) distribution facility staff receive payment and distribute medical cannabis in a designated zone that is as close as feasible to the front door of the distribution facility;

 

(2) the manufacturer ensures that the receipt of payment and distribution of medical cannabis are visually recorded by a closed-circuit television surveillance camera at the distribution facility and provides any other necessary security safeguards;

 

(3) the manufacturer does not store medical cannabis outside a restricted access area at the distribution facility, and distribution facility staff transport medical cannabis from a restricted access area at the distribution facility to the designated zone for distribution only after confirming that the patient, designated caregiver, or parent, guardian, or spouse has arrived in the designated zone;

 

(4) the payment and distribution of medical cannabis take place only after a pharmacist consultation takes place, if required under subdivision 3, paragraph (c), clause (4);

 

(5) immediately following distribution of medical cannabis, distribution facility staff enter the transaction in the state medical cannabis registry information technology database; and

 

(6) immediately following distribution of medical cannabis, distribution facility staff take the payment received into the distribution facility.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective the day following final enactment.


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Sec. 40.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 152.29, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

 

Subd. 3c.  Disposal of medical cannabis plant root balls.  Notwithstanding Minnesota Rules, part 4770.1200, subpart 2, item C, a manufacturer is not required to grind root balls of medical cannabis plants or incorporate them with a greater quantity of nonconsumable solid waste before transporting root balls to another location for disposal.  For purposes of this subdivision, "root ball" means a compact mass of roots formed by a plant and any attached growing medium.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective the day following final enactment.

 

Sec. 41.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 152.31, is amended to read:

 

152.31 DATA PRACTICES.

 

(a) Government data in patient files maintained by the commissioner and the health care practitioner, and data submitted to or by a medical cannabis manufacturer, are private data on individuals, as defined in section 13.02, subdivision 12, or nonpublic data, as defined in section 13.02, subdivision 9, but may be used for purposes of complying with chapter 13 and complying with a request from the legislative auditor or the state auditor in the performance of official duties.  The provisions of section 13.05, subdivision 11, apply to a registration agreement entered between the commissioner and a medical cannabis manufacturer under section 152.25.

 

(b) Not public data maintained by the commissioner may not be used for any purpose not provided for in sections 152.22 to 152.37, and may not be combined or linked in any manner with any other list, dataset, or database.

 

(c) The commissioner may execute data sharing arrangements with the commissioner of agriculture to verify licensing, inspection, and compliance information related to hemp growers and hemp processors under chapter 18K.

 

Sec. 42.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 157.22, is amended to read:

 

157.22 EXEMPTIONS.

 

This chapter does not apply to:

 

(1) interstate carriers under the supervision of the United States Department of Health and Human Services;

 

(2) weddings, fellowship meals, or funerals conducted by a faith-based organization using any building constructed and primarily used for religious worship or education;

 

(3) any building owned, operated, and used by a college or university in accordance with health regulations promulgated by the college or university under chapter 14;

 

(4) any person, firm, or corporation whose principal mode of business is licensed under sections 28A.04 and 28A.05, is exempt at that premises from licensure as a food or beverage establishment; provided that the holding of any license pursuant to sections 28A.04 and 28A.05 shall not exempt any person, firm, or corporation from the applicable provisions of this chapter or the rules of the state commissioner of health relating to food and beverage service establishments;

 

(5) family day care homes and group family day care homes governed by sections 245A.01 to 245A.16;

 

(6) nonprofit senior citizen centers for the sale of home-baked goods;


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(7) fraternal, sportsman, or patriotic organizations that are tax exempt under section 501(c)(3), 501(c)(4), 501(c)(6), 501(c)(7), 501(c)(10), or 501(c)(19) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, or organizations related to, affiliated with, or supported by such fraternal, sportsman, or patriotic organizations for events held in the building or on the grounds of the organization and at which home-prepared food is donated by organization members for sale at the events, provided:

 

(i) the event is not a circus, carnival, or fair;

 

(ii) the organization controls the admission of persons to the event, the event agenda, or both; and

 

(iii) the organization's licensed kitchen is not used in any manner for the event;

 

(8) food not prepared at an establishment and brought in by individuals attending a potluck event for consumption at the potluck event.  An organization sponsoring a potluck event under this clause may advertise the potluck event to the public through any means.  Individuals who are not members of an organization sponsoring a potluck event under this clause may attend the potluck event and consume the food at the event.  Licensed food establishments other than schools cannot be sponsors of potluck events.  A school may sponsor and hold potluck events in areas of the school other than the school's kitchen, provided that the school's kitchen is not used in any manner for the potluck event.  For purposes of this clause, "school" means a public school as defined in section 120A.05, subdivisions 9, 11, 13, and 17, or a nonpublic school, church, or religious organization at which a child is provided with instruction in compliance with sections 120A.22 and 120A.24.  Potluck event food shall not be brought into a licensed food establishment kitchen;

 

(9) a home school in which a child is provided instruction at home;

 

(10) school concession stands serving commercially prepared, nonpotentially hazardous foods, as defined in Minnesota Rules, chapter 4626;

 

(11) group residential facilities of ten or fewer beds licensed by the commissioner of human services under Minnesota Rules, chapter 2960, provided the facility employs or contracts with a certified food manager under Minnesota Rules, part 4626.2015;

 

(12) food served at fund-raisers or community events conducted in the building or on the grounds of a faith‑based organization, provided that a certified food manager, or a volunteer trained in a food safety course, trains the food preparation workers in safe food handling practices.  This exemption does not apply to faith-based organizations at the state agricultural society or county fairs or to faith-based organizations that choose to apply for a license;

 

(12) food served at fund-raisers, community events or fellowship meals conducted in the building or on the grounds of a faith-based organization, provided that a certified food manager or volunteer trained in a food safety course, trains the food preparation workers in safe food handling practices.  Food prepared during these events is allowed to be made available for curbside pickup or delivered to members of the faith-based organization or the community in which the faith-based organization serves.  This exemption does not apply to faith-based organizations at the state agricultural society or county fairs or to faith-based organizations that choose to apply for a license;

 

(13) food service events conducted following a disaster for purposes of feeding disaster relief staff and volunteers serving commercially prepared, nonpotentially hazardous foods, as defined in Minnesota Rules, chapter 4626;

 

(14) chili or soup served at a chili or soup cook-off fund-raiser conducted by a community-based nonprofit organization, provided:


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(i) the municipality where the event is located approves the event;

 

(ii) the sponsoring organization must develop food safety rules and ensure that participants follow these rules; and

 

(iii) if the food is not prepared in a kitchen that is licensed or inspected, a visible sign or placard must be posted that states:  "These products are homemade and not subject to state inspection."

 

Foods exempt under this clause must be labeled to accurately reflect the name and address of the person preparing the foods; and

 

(15) a special event food stand or a seasonal temporary food stand provided:

 

(i) the stand is located on private property with the permission of the property owner;

 

(ii) the stand has gross receipts or contributions of $1,000 or less in a calendar year; and

 

(iii) the operator of the stand posts a sign or placard at the site that states "The products sold at this stand are not subject to state inspection or regulation." if the stand offers for sale potentially hazardous food as defined in Minnesota Rules, part 4626.0020, subpart 62.

 

Sec. 43.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 256.98, subdivision 1, is amended to read:

 

Subdivision 1.  Wrongfully obtaining assistance.  (a) A person who commits any of the following acts or omissions with intent to defeat the purposes of sections 145.891 to 145.897, the MFIP program formerly codified in sections 256.031 to 256.0361, the AFDC program formerly codified in sections 256.72 to 256.871, chapter 256B, 256D, 256I, 256J, 256K, or 256L, child care assistance programs, and emergency assistance programs under section 256D.06, is guilty of theft and shall be sentenced under section 609.52, subdivision 3, clauses (1) to (5):

 

(1) obtains or attempts to obtain, or aids or abets any person to obtain by means of a willfully false statement or representation, by intentional concealment of any material fact, or by impersonation or other fraudulent device, assistance or the continued receipt of assistance, to include child care assistance or vouchers food benefits produced according to sections 145.891 to 145.897 and MinnesotaCare services according to sections 256.9365, 256.94, and 256L.01 to 256L.15, to which the person is not entitled or assistance greater than that to which the person is entitled;

 

(2) knowingly aids or abets in buying or in any way disposing of the property of a recipient or applicant of assistance without the consent of the county agency; or

 

(3) obtains or attempts to obtain, alone or in collusion with others, the receipt of payments to which the individual is not entitled as a provider of subsidized child care, or by furnishing or concurring in a willfully false claim for child care assistance.

 

(b) The continued receipt of assistance to which the person is not entitled or greater than that to which the person is entitled as a result of any of the acts, failure to act, or concealment described in this subdivision shall be deemed to be continuing offenses from the date that the first act or failure to act occurred.

 

Sec. 44.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 326.71, subdivision 4, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 4.  Asbestos-related work.  "Asbestos-related work" means the enclosure, removal, or encapsulation of asbestos-containing material in a quantity that meets or exceeds 260 linear feet of friable asbestos-containing material on pipes, 160 square feet of friable asbestos-containing material on other facility components, or, if linear feet or square feet cannot be measured, a total of 35 cubic feet of friable asbestos-containing material on or off all


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facility components in one facility.  In the case of single or multifamily residences, "asbestos-related work" also means the enclosure, removal, or encapsulation of greater than ten but less than 260 linear feet of friable asbestos‑containing material on pipes, greater than six but less than 160 square feet of friable asbestos-containing material on other facility components, or, if linear feet or square feet cannot be measured, greater than one cubic foot but less than 35 cubic feet of friable asbestos-containing material on or off all facility components in one facility.  This provision excludes asbestos-containing floor tiles and sheeting, roofing materials, siding, and all ceilings with asbestos-containing material in single family residences and buildings with no more than four dwelling units.  Asbestos-related work includes asbestos abatement area preparation; enclosure, removal, or encapsulation operations; and an air quality monitoring specified in rule to assure that the abatement and adjacent areas are not contaminated with asbestos fibers during the project and after completion.

 

For purposes of this subdivision, the quantity of asbestos containing asbestos-containing material applies separately for every project.

 

Sec. 45.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 326.75, subdivision 1, is amended to read:

 

Subdivision 1.  Licensing fee.  A person required to be licensed under section 326.72 shall, before receipt of the license and before causing asbestos-related work to be performed, pay the commissioner an annual license fee of $100 $105.

 

Sec. 46.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 326.75, subdivision 2, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 2.  Certification fee.  An individual required to be certified as an asbestos worker or asbestos site supervisor under section 326.73, subdivision 1, shall pay the commissioner a certification fee of $50 $52.50 before the issuance of the certificate.  The commissioner may establish by rule fees required before the issuance of An individual required to be certified as an asbestos inspector, asbestos management planner, and or asbestos project designer certificates required under section 326.73, subdivisions 2, 3, and 4, shall pay the commissioner a certification fee of $105 before the issuance of the certificate.

 

Sec. 47.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 326.75, subdivision 3, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 3.  Permit fee.  Five calendar days before beginning asbestos-related work, a person shall pay a project permit fee to the commissioner equal to one two percent of the total costs of the asbestos-related work.  For asbestos-related work performed in single or multifamily residences, of greater than ten but less than 260 linear feet of asbestos-containing material on pipes, or greater than six but less than 160 square feet of asbestos-containing material on other facility components, a person shall pay a project permit fee of $35 to the commissioner.

 

Sec. 48.  Laws 2008, chapter 364, section 17, is amended to read:

 

Sec. 17.  APPROPRIATIONS.

 

(a) $261,000 is appropriated from the state government special revenue fund to the commissioner of health for the purposes of this act for fiscal year 2009.  Base level funding for this appropriation shall be $77,000 for fiscal years beginning on or after July 1, 2009.

 

(b) Of the appropriation in paragraph (a), $116,000 in fiscal year 2009 is for the study and report required in section 12, $145,000 in fiscal year 2009 shall be transferred to the general fund, and $77,000 shall be transferred for each fiscal year beginning on or after July 1, 2009.

 

(c) (a) $145,000 is appropriated from the general fund to the commissioner of human services for fiscal year 2009 for the actuarial and other department costs associated with additional reporting requirements for health plans and county-based purchasing plans.  Base level funding for this appropriation for fiscal years beginning on or after July 1, 2009, shall be $135,000 each year.


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(d) (b) $96,000 is appropriated from the general fund to the commissioner of human services for fiscal year 2009 for the study authorized in section 11, clause (3).  This appropriation is onetime.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective July 1, 2021.

 

Sec. 49.  Laws 2019, First Special Session chapter 9, article 14, section 3, as amended by Laws 2019, First Special Session chapter 12, section 6, is amended to read:

 

Sec. 3.  COMMISSIONER OF HEALTH

 

 

 

 

 

Subdivision 1.  Total Appropriation

 

 

$231,829,000

 

$ 236,188,000 233,584,000

 

Appropriations by Fund

 

 

2020

 

2021

General

 

 124,381,000

 126,276,000 125,881,000

State Government Special Revenue

 

58,450,000

61,367,000 59,158,000

Health Care Access

37,285,000

36,832,000

Federal TANF

11,713,000

11,713,000

 

The amounts that may be spent for each purpose are specified in the following subdivisions.

 

Subd. 2.  Health Improvement

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriations by Fund

 

General

 

 94,980,000

 96,117,000 95,722,000

State Government Special Revenue

 

7,614,000

7,558,000 6,924,000

Health Care Access

37,285,000

36,832,000

Federal TANF

11,713,000

11,713,000

 

(a) TANF Appropriations.  (1) $3,579,000 in fiscal year 2020 and $3,579,000 in fiscal year 2021 are from the TANF fund for home visiting and nutritional services under Minnesota Statutes, section 145.882, subdivision 7, clauses (6) and (7).  Funds must be distributed to community health boards according to Minnesota Statutes, section 145A.131, subdivision 1;

 

(2) $2,000,000 in fiscal year 2020 and $2,000,000 in fiscal year 2021 are from the TANF fund for decreasing racial and ethnic disparities in infant mortality rates under Minnesota Statutes, section 145.928, subdivision 7;


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(3) $4,978,000 in fiscal year 2020 and $4,978,000 in fiscal year 2021 are from the TANF fund for the family home visiting grant program under Minnesota Statutes, section 145A.17.  $4,000,000 of the funding in each fiscal year must be distributed to community health boards according to Minnesota Statutes, section 145A.131, subdivision 1.  $978,000 of the funding in each fiscal year must be distributed to tribal governments according to Minnesota Statutes, section 145A.14, subdivision 2a;

 

(4) $1,156,000 in fiscal year 2020 and $1,156,000 in fiscal year 2021 are from the TANF fund for family planning grants under Minnesota Statutes, section 145.925; and

 

(5) The commissioner may use up to 6.23 percent of the amounts appropriated from the TANF fund each year to conduct the ongoing evaluations required under Minnesota Statutes, section 145A.17, subdivision 7, and training and technical assistance as required under Minnesota Statutes, section 145A.17, subdivisions 4 and 5.

 

(b) TANF Carryforward.  Any unexpended balance of the TANF appropriation in the first year of the biennium does not cancel but is available for the second year.

 

(c) Comprehensive Suicide Prevention.  $2,730,000 in fiscal year 2020 and $2,730,000 in fiscal year 2021 are from the general fund for a comprehensive, community-based suicide prevention strategy.  The funds are allocated as follows:

 

(1) $955,000 in fiscal year 2020 and $955,000 in fiscal year 2021 are for community-based suicide prevention grants authorized in Minnesota Statutes, section 145.56, subdivision 2.  Specific emphasis must be placed on those communities with the greatest disparities.  The base for this appropriation is $1,291,000 in fiscal year 2022 and $1,291,000 in fiscal year 2023;

 

(2) $683,000 in fiscal year 2020 and $683,000 in fiscal year 2021 are to support evidence-based training for educators and school staff and purchase suicide prevention curriculum for student use statewide, as authorized in Minnesota Statutes, section 145.56, subdivision 2.  The base for this appropriation is $913,000 in fiscal year 2022 and $913,000 in fiscal year 2023;

 

(3) $137,000 in fiscal year 2020 and $137,000 in fiscal year 2021 are to implement the Zero Suicide framework with up to 20 behavioral and health care organizations each year to treat individuals at risk for suicide and support those individuals across systems of care upon discharge.  The base for this appropriation is $205,000 in fiscal year 2022 and $205,000 in fiscal year 2023;


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(4) $955,000 in fiscal year 2020 and $955,000 in fiscal year 2021 are to develop and fund a Minnesota-based network of National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, providing statewide coverage.  The base for this appropriation is $1,321,000 in fiscal year 2022 and $1,321,000 in fiscal year 2023; and

 

(5) the commissioner may retain up to 18.23 percent of the appropriation under this paragraph to administer the comprehensive suicide prevention strategy.

 

(d) Statewide Tobacco Cessation.  $1,598,000 in fiscal year 2020 and $2,748,000 in fiscal year 2021 are from the general fund for statewide tobacco cessation services under Minnesota Statutes, section 144.397.  The base for this appropriation is $2,878,000 in fiscal year 2022 and $2,878,000 in fiscal year 2023.

 

(e) Health Care Access Survey.  $225,000 in fiscal year 2020 and $225,000 in fiscal year 2021 are from the health care access fund to continue and improve the Minnesota Health Care Access Survey.  These appropriations may be used in either year of the biennium.

 

(f) Community Solutions for Healthy Child Development Grant Program.  $1,000,000 in fiscal year 2020 and $1,000,000 in fiscal year 2021 are for the community solutions for healthy child development grant program to promote health and racial equity for young children and their families under article 11, section 107.  The commissioner may use up to 23.5 percent of the total appropriation for administration.  The base for this appropriation is $1,000,000 in fiscal year 2022, $1,000,000 in fiscal year 2023, and $0 in fiscal year 2024.

 

(g) Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Prevention Program.  $375,000 in fiscal year 2020 and $375,000 in fiscal year 2021 are from the general fund for the domestic violence and sexual assault prevention program under article 11, section 108.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

(h) Skin Lightening Products Public Awareness Grant Program.  $100,000 in fiscal year 2020 and $100,000 in fiscal year 2021 are from the general fund for a skin lightening products public awareness and education grant program.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

(i) Cannabinoid Products Workgroup.  $8,000 in fiscal year 2020 is from the state government special revenue fund for the cannabinoid products workgroup.  This is a onetime appropriation.

 

(j) Base Level Adjustments.  The general fund base is $96,742,000 in fiscal year 2022 and $96,742,000 in fiscal year 2023.  The health care access fund base is $37,432,000 in fiscal year 2022 and $36,832,000 in fiscal year 2023.


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Subd. 3.  Health Protection

 

 

 

 

 

Appropriations by Fund

 

General

18,803,000

19,774,000

State Government Special Revenue

 

50,836,000

53,809,000 52,234,000

 

(a) Public Health Laboratory Equipment.  $840,000 in fiscal year 2020 and $655,000 in fiscal year 2021 are from the general fund for equipment for the public health laboratory.  This is a onetime appropriation and is available until June 30, 2023.

 

(b) Base Level Adjustment.  The general fund base is $19,119,000 in fiscal year 2022 and $19,119,000 in fiscal year 2023.  The state government special revenue fund base is $53,782,000 in fiscal year 2022 and $53,782,000 in fiscal year 2023.

 

Subd. 4.  Health Operations

 

10,598,000

 

10,385,000

 

Base Level Adjustment.  The general fund base is $10,912,000 in fiscal year 2022 and $10,912,000 in fiscal year 2023.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective the day following final enactment and the reductions in subdivisions 1 to 3 are onetime reductions.

 

Sec. 50.  Laws 2020, Seventh Special Session chapter 1, article 6, section 12, subdivision 4, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 4.  Housing with services establishment registration; conversion to an assisted living facility license.  (a) Housing with services establishments registered under chapter 144D, providing home care services according to chapter 144A to at least one resident, and intending to provide assisted living services on or after August 1, 2021, must submit an application for an assisted living facility license in accordance with section 144G.12 no later than June 1, 2021.  The commissioner shall consider the application in accordance with section 144G.16 144G.15.

 

(b) Notwithstanding the housing with services contract requirements identified in section 144D.04, any existing housing with services establishment registered under chapter 144D that does not intend to convert its registration to an assisted living facility license under this chapter must provide written notice to its residents at least 60 days before the expiration of its registration, or no later than May 31, 2021, whichever is earlier.  The notice must:

 

(1) state that the housing with services establishment does not intend to convert to an assisted living facility;

 

(2) include the date when the housing with services establishment will no longer provide housing with services;

 

(3) include the name, e­mail address, and phone number of the individual associated with the housing with services establishment that the recipient of home care services may contact to discuss the notice;

 

(4) include the contact information consisting of the phone number, e­mail address, mailing address, and website for the Office of Ombudsman for Long-Term Care and the Office of Ombudsman for Mental Health and Developmental Disabilities; and


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(5) for residents who receive home and community-based waiver services under section 256B.49 and chapter 256S, also be provided to the resident's case manager at the same time that it is provided to the resident.

 

(c) A housing with services registrant that obtains an assisted living facility license, but does so under a different business name as a result of reincorporation, and continues to provide services to the recipient, is not subject to the 60-day notice required under paragraph (b).  However, the provider must otherwise provide notice to the recipient as required under sections 144D.04 and 144D.045, as applicable, and section 144D.09.

 

(d) All registered housing with services establishments providing assisted living under sections 144G.01 to 144G.07 prior to August 1, 2021, must have an assisted living facility license under this chapter.

 

(e) Effective August 1, 2021, any housing with services establishment registered under chapter 144D that has not converted its registration to an assisted living facility license under this chapter is prohibited from providing assisted living services.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective retroactively from December 17, 2020.

 

Sec. 51.  DIRECTION TO MODIFY MARRIAGE LICENSE APPLICATIONS.

 

A local registrar or a designee of the county board shall delete from the county's marriage license application any space or other manner in which the applicant is required to specify the applicant's race.

 

ARTICLE 4

HEALTH-RELATED LICENSING BOARDS

 

Section 1.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 151.01, subdivision 29, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 29.  Legend Medical gas.  "Legend Medical gas" means a liquid or gaseous substance used for medical purposes and that is required by federal law to be dispensed only pursuant to the prescription of a licensed practitioner any gas or liquid manufactured or stored in a liquefied, nonliquefied, or cryogenic state that:

 

(1) has a chemical or physical action in or on the human body or animals or is used in conjunction with medical gas equipment; and

 

(2) is intended to be used for the diagnosis, cure, mitigation, treatment, or prevention of disease.

 

Sec. 2.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 151.01, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

 

Subd. 29a.  Medical gas manufacturer.  "Medical gas manufacturer" means any person:

 

(1) originally manufacturing a medical gas by chemical reaction, physical separation, compression of atmospheric air, purification, or other means;

 

(2) filling a medical gas into a dispensing container via gas to gas, liquid to gas, or liquid to liquid processes;

 

(3) combining two or more medical gases into a container to form a medically appropriate mixture; or

 

(4) filling a medical gas via liquid to liquid into a final use container at the point of use.


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Sec. 3.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 151.01, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

 

Subd. 29b.  Medical gas wholesaler.  "Medical gas wholesaler" means any person who sells a medical gas to another business or entity for the purpose of reselling or providing that medical gas to the ultimate consumer or patient.

 

Sec. 4.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 151.01, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

 

Subd. 29c.  Medical gas dispenser.  "Medical gas dispenser" means any person, other than a licensed practitioner or pharmacy, who sells or provides a medical gas directly to the ultimate consumer or patient via a valid prescription.

 

Sec. 5.  [151.191] LICENSING MEDICAL GAS FACILITIES; FEES; PROHIBITIONS.

 

Subdivision 1.  Medical gas manufacturers; requirements.  (a) No person shall act as a medical gas manufacturer without first obtaining a license from the board and paying any applicable fee specified in section 151.065.

 

(b) Application for a medical gas manufacturer license under this section must be made in a manner specified by the board.

 

(c) A license must not be issued or renewed for a medical gas manufacturer unless the applicant agrees to operate in a manner prescribed by federal and state law and according to Minnesota Rules.

 

(d) A license must not be issued or renewed for a medical gas manufacturer that is required to be licensed or registered by the state in which it is physically located unless the applicant supplies the board with proof of licensure or registration.  The board may establish standards for the licensure of a medical gas manufacturer that is not required to be licensed or registered by the state in which it is physically located.

 

(e) The board must require a separate license for each facility located within the state at which medical gas manufacturing occurs and for each facility located outside of the state at which medical gases that are shipped into the state are manufactured.

 

(f) Prior to the issuance of an initial or renewed license for a medical gas manufacturing facility, the board may require the facility to pass an inspection conducted by an authorized representative of the board.  In the case of a medical gas manufacturing facility located outside of the state, the board may require the applicant to pay the cost of the inspection, in addition to the license fee in section 151.065, unless the applicant furnishes the board with a report, issued by the appropriate regulatory agency of the state in which the facility is located, of an inspection that has occurred within the 24 months immediately preceding receipt of the license application by the board.  The board may deny licensure unless the applicant submits documentation satisfactory to the board that any deficiencies noted in an inspection report have been corrected.

 

(g) A duly licensed medical gas manufacturing facility may also wholesale or dispense any medical gas that is manufactured by the licensed facility, or manufactured or wholesaled by another properly licensed medical gas facility, without also obtaining a medical gas wholesaler license or medical gas dispenser registration.

 

(h) The filling of a medical gas into a final use container, at the point of use and by liquid to liquid transfer, is permitted as long as the facility used as the base of operations is duly licensed as a medical gas manufacturer.

 

Subd. 2.  Medical gas wholesalers; requirements.  (a) No person shall act as a medical gas wholesaler without first obtaining a license from the board and paying any applicable fee specified in section 151.065.


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(b) Application for a medical gas wholesaler license under this section must be made in a manner specified by the board.

 

(c) A license must not be issued or renewed for a medical gas wholesaler unless the applicant agrees to operate in a manner prescribed by federal and state law and according to Minnesota Rules.

 

(d) A license must not be issued or renewed for a medical gas wholesaler that is required to be licensed or registered by the state in which it is physically located unless the applicant supplies the board with proof of licensure or registration.  The board may establish standards for the licensure of a medical gas wholesaler that is not required to be licensed or registered by the state in which it is physically located.

 

(e) The board must require a separate license for each facility located within the state at which medical gas wholesaling occurs and for each facility located outside of the state from which medical gases that are shipped into the state are wholesaled.

 

(f) Prior to the issuance of an initial or renewed license for a medical gas wholesaling facility, the board may require the facility to pass an inspection conducted by an authorized representative of the board.  In the case of a medical gas wholesaling facility located outside of the state, the board may require the applicant to pay the cost of the inspection, in addition to the license fee in section 151.065, unless the applicant furnishes the board with a report, issued by the appropriate regulatory agency of the state in which the facility is located, of an inspection that has occurred within the 24 months immediately preceding receipt of the license application by the board.  The board may deny licensure unless the applicant submits documentation satisfactory to the board that any deficiencies noted in an inspection report have been corrected.

 

(g) A duly licensed medical gas wholesaling facility may also dispense any medical gas that is manufactured or wholesaled by another properly licensed medical gas facility.

 

Subd. 3.  Medical gas dispensers; requirements.  (a) A person or establishment not licensed as a pharmacy, practitioner, medical gas manufacturer, or medical gas dispenser must not engage in the dispensing of medical gases without first obtaining a registration from the board and paying the applicable fee specified in section 151.065.  The registration must be displayed in a conspicuous place in the business for which it is issued and expires on the date set by the board.

 

(b) Application for a medical gas dispenser registration under this section must be made in a manner specified by the board.

 

(c) A registration must not be issued or renewed for a medical gas dispenser located within the state unless the applicant agrees to operate in a manner prescribed by federal and state law and according to the rules adopted by the board.  A license must not be issued for a medical gas dispenser located outside of the state unless the applicant agrees to operate in a manner prescribed by federal law and, when dispensing medical gases for residents of this state, the laws of this state and Minnesota Rules.

 

(d) A registration must not be issued or renewed for a medical gas dispenser that is required to be licensed or registered by the state in which it is physically located unless the applicant supplies the board with proof of the licensure or registration.  The board may establish standards for the registration of a medical gas dispenser that is not required to be licensed or registered by the state in which it is physically located.

 

(e) The board must require a separate registration for each medical gas dispenser located within the state and for each facility located outside of the state from which medical gases are dispensed to residents of this state.


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(f) Prior to the issuance of an initial or renewed registration for a medical gas dispenser, the board may require the medical gas dispenser to pass an inspection conducted by an authorized representative of the board.  In the case of a medical gas dispenser located outside of the state, the board may require the applicant to pay the cost of the inspection, in addition to the license fee in section 151.065, unless the applicant furnishes the board with a report, issued by the appropriate regulatory agency of the state in which the facility is located, of an inspection that has occurred within the 24 months immediately preceding receipt of the license application by the board.  The board may deny licensure unless the applicant submits documentation satisfactory to the board that any deficiencies noted in an inspection report have been corrected.

 

(g) A facility holding a medical gas dispenser registration must not engage in the manufacturing or wholesaling of medical gases, except that a medical gas dispenser may transfer medical gases from one of its duly registered facilities to other duly registered medical gas manufacturing, wholesaling, or dispensing facilities owned or operated by that same company, without requiring a medical gas wholesaler license.

 

Sec. 6.  REPEALER.

 

Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 151.19, subdivision 3, is repealed.

 

ARTICLE 5

PRESCRIPTION DRUGS

 

Section 1.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 62W.11, is amended to read:

 

62W.11 GAG CLAUSE PROHIBITION.

 

(a) No contract between a pharmacy benefit manager or health carrier and a pharmacy or pharmacist shall prohibit, restrict, or penalize a pharmacy or pharmacist from disclosing to an enrollee any health care information that the pharmacy or pharmacist deems appropriate regarding the nature of treatment; the risks or alternatives; the availability of alternative therapies, consultations, or tests; the decision of utilization reviewers or similar persons to authorize or deny services; the process that is used to authorize or deny health care services or benefits; or information on financial incentives and structures used by the health carrier or pharmacy benefit manager.

 

(b) A pharmacy or pharmacist must provide to an enrollee information regarding the enrollee's total cost for each prescription drug dispensed where part or all of the cost of the prescription is being paid or reimbursed by the employer-sponsored plan or by a health carrier or pharmacy benefit manager, in accordance with section 151.214, subdivision 1.

 

(c) A pharmacy benefit manager or health carrier must not prohibit a pharmacist or pharmacy from discussing information regarding the total cost for pharmacy services for a prescription drug, including the patient's co-payment amount and, the pharmacy's own usual and customary price of for the prescription drug, the pharmacy's acquisition cost for the prescription drug, and the amount the pharmacy is being reimbursed by the pharmacy benefit manager or health carrier for the prescription drug.

 

(d) A pharmacy benefit manager must not prohibit a pharmacist or pharmacy from discussing with a health carrier the amount the pharmacy is being paid or reimbursed for a prescription drug by the pharmacy benefit manager or the pharmacy's acquisition cost for a prescription drug.

 

(d) (e) A pharmacy benefit manager or health carrier must not prohibit a pharmacist or pharmacy from discussing the availability of any therapeutically equivalent alternative prescription drugs or alternative methods for purchasing the prescription drug, including but not limited to paying out-of-pocket the pharmacy's usual and customary price when that amount is less expensive to the enrollee than the amount the enrollee is required to pay for the prescription drug under the enrollee's health plan.


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Sec. 2.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 151.555, subdivision 1, is amended to read:

 

Subdivision 1.  Definitions.  (a) For the purposes of this section, the terms defined in this subdivision have the meanings given.

 

(b) "Central repository" means a wholesale distributor that meets the requirements under subdivision 3 and enters into a contract with the Board of Pharmacy in accordance with this section.

 

(c) "Distribute" means to deliver, other than by administering or dispensing.

 

(d) "Donor" means:

 

(1) a health care facility as defined in this subdivision;

 

(2) a skilled nursing facility licensed under chapter 144A;

 

(3) an assisted living facility registered under chapter 144D where there is centralized storage of drugs and 24‑hour on-site licensed nursing coverage provided seven days a week;

 

(4) a pharmacy licensed under section 151.19, and located either in the state or outside the state;

 

(5) a drug wholesaler licensed under section 151.47;

 

(6) a drug manufacturer licensed under section 151.252; or

 

(7) an individual at least 18 years of age, provided that the drug or medical supply that is donated was obtained legally and meets the requirements of this section for donation.

 

(e) "Drug" means any prescription drug that has been approved for medical use in the United States, is listed in the United States Pharmacopoeia or National Formulary, and meets the criteria established under this section for donation; or any over-the-counter medication that meets the criteria established under this section for donation.  This definition includes cancer drugs and antirejection drugs, but does not include controlled substances, as defined in section 152.01, subdivision 4, or a prescription drug that can only be dispensed to a patient registered with the drug's manufacturer in accordance with federal Food and Drug Administration requirements.

 

(f) "Health care facility" means:

 

(1) a physician's office or health care clinic where licensed practitioners provide health care to patients;

 

(2) a hospital licensed under section 144.50;

 

(3) a pharmacy licensed under section 151.19 and located in Minnesota; or

 

(4) a nonprofit community clinic, including a federally qualified health center; a rural health clinic; public health clinic; or other community clinic that provides health care utilizing a sliding fee scale to patients who are low‑income, uninsured, or underinsured.

 

(g) "Local repository" means a health care facility that elects to accept donated drugs and medical supplies and meets the requirements of subdivision 4.

 

(h) "Medical supplies" or "supplies" means any prescription and nonprescription medical supplies needed to administer a prescription drug.


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(i) "Original, sealed, unopened, tamper-evident packaging" means packaging that is sealed, unopened, and tamper-evident, including a manufacturer's original unit dose or unit-of-use container, a repackager's original unit dose or unit-of-use container, or unit-dose packaging prepared by a licensed pharmacy according to the standards of Minnesota Rules, part 6800.3750.

 

(j) "Practitioner" has the meaning given in section 151.01, subdivision 23, except that it does not include a veterinarian.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective the day following final enactment.

 

Sec. 3.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 151.555, subdivision 7, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 7.  Standards and procedures for inspecting and storing donated prescription drugs and supplies.  (a) A pharmacist or authorized practitioner who is employed by or under contract with the central repository or a local repository shall inspect all donated prescription drugs and supplies before the drug or supply is dispensed to determine, to the extent reasonably possible in the professional judgment of the pharmacist or practitioner, that the drug or supply is not adulterated or misbranded, has not been tampered with, is safe and suitable for dispensing, has not been subject to a recall, and meets the requirements for donation.  The pharmacist or practitioner who inspects the drugs or supplies shall sign an inspection record stating that the requirements for donation have been met.  If a local repository receives drugs and supplies from the central repository, the local repository does not need to reinspect the drugs and supplies.

 

(b) The central repository and local repositories shall store donated drugs and supplies in a secure storage area under environmental conditions appropriate for the drug or supply being stored.  Donated drugs and supplies may not be stored with nondonated inventory.  If donated drugs or supplies are not inspected immediately upon receipt, a repository must quarantine the donated drugs or supplies separately from all dispensing stock until the donated drugs or supplies have been inspected and (1) approved for dispensing under the program; (2) disposed of pursuant to paragraph (c); or (3) returned to the donor pursuant to paragraph (d).

 

(c) The central repository and local repositories shall dispose of all prescription drugs and medical supplies that are not suitable for donation in compliance with applicable federal and state statutes, regulations, and rules concerning hazardous waste.

 

(d) In the event that controlled substances or prescription drugs that can only be dispensed to a patient registered with the drug's manufacturer are shipped or delivered to a central or local repository for donation, the shipment delivery must be documented by the repository and returned immediately to the donor or the donor's representative that provided the drugs.

 

(e) Each repository must develop drug and medical supply recall policies and procedures.  If a repository receives a recall notification, the repository shall destroy all of the drug or medical supply in its inventory that is the subject of the recall and complete a record of destruction form in accordance with paragraph (f).  If a drug or medical supply that is the subject of a Class I or Class II recall has been dispensed, the repository shall immediately notify the recipient of the recalled drug or medical supply.  A drug that potentially is subject to a recall need not be destroyed if its packaging bears a lot number and that lot of the drug is not subject to the recall.  If no lot number is on the drug's packaging, it must be destroyed.

 

(f) A record of destruction of donated drugs and supplies that are not dispensed under subdivision 8, are subject to a recall under paragraph (e), or are not suitable for donation shall be maintained by the repository for at least five two years.  For each drug or supply destroyed, the record shall include the following information:

 

(1) the date of destruction;


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(2) the name, strength, and quantity of the drug destroyed; and

 

(3) the name of the person or firm that destroyed the drug.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective the day following final enactment.

 

Sec. 4.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 151.555, subdivision 11, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 11.  Forms and record-keeping requirements.  (a) The following forms developed for the administration of this program shall be utilized by the participants of the program and shall be available on the board's website:

 

(1) intake application form described under subdivision 5;

 

(2) local repository participation form described under subdivision 4;

 

(3) local repository withdrawal form described under subdivision 4;

 

(4) drug repository donor form described under subdivision 6;

 

(5) record of destruction form described under subdivision 7; and

 

(6) drug repository recipient form described under subdivision 8.

 

(b) All records, including drug inventory, inspection, and disposal of donated prescription drugs and medical supplies, must be maintained by a repository for a minimum of five two years.  Records required as part of this program must be maintained pursuant to all applicable practice acts.

 

(c) Data collected by the drug repository program from all local repositories shall be submitted quarterly or upon request to the central repository.  Data collected may consist of the information, records, and forms required to be collected under this section.

 

(d) The central repository shall submit reports to the board as required by the contract or upon request of the board.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective the day following final enactment.

 

Sec. 5.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 151.555, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

 

Subd. 14.  Cooperation.  The central repository, as approved by the Board of Pharmacy, may enter into an agreement with another state that has an established drug repository or drug donation program if the other state's program includes regulations to ensure the purity, integrity, and safety of the drugs and supplies donated, to permit the central repository to offer to another state program inventory that is not needed by a Minnesota resident and to accept inventory from another state program to be distributed to local repositories and dispensed to Minnesota residents in accordance with this program.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective the day following final enactment.


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ARTICLE 6

HEALTH INSURANCE

 

Section 1.  [62Q.097] REQUIREMENTS FOR TIMELY PROVIDER CREDENTIALING.

 

Subdivision 1.  Definitions.  (a) The definitions in this subdivision apply to this section.

 

(b) "Clean application for provider credentialing" or "clean application" means an application for provider credentialing submitted by a health care provider to a health plan company that is complete, is in the format required by the health plan company, and includes all information and substantiation required by the health plan company and does not require evaluation of any identified potential quality or safety concern.

 

(c) "Provider credentialing" means the process undertaken by a health plan company to evaluate and approve a health care provider's education, training, residency, licenses, certifications, and history of significant quality or safety concerns in order to approve the health care provider to provide health care services to patients at a clinic or facility.

 

Subd. 2.  Time limit for credentialing determination.  A health plan company that receives an application for provider credentialing must:

 

(1) if the application is determined to be a clean application for provider credentialing and if the health care provider submitting the application or the clinic or facility at which the health care provider provides services requests the information, affirm that the health care provider's application is a clean application and notify the health care provider or clinic or facility of the date by which the health plan company will make a determination on the health care provider's application;

 

(2) if the application is determined not to be a clean application, inform the health care provider of the application's deficiencies or missing information or substantiation within three business days after the health plan company determines the application is not a clean application; and

 

(3) make a determination on the health care provider's clean application within 45 days after receiving the clean application unless the health plan company identifies a substantive quality or safety concern in the course of provider credentialing that requires further investigation.  Upon notice to the health care provider, clinic, or facility, the health plan company is allowed 30 additional days to investigate any quality or safety concerns.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section applies to applications for provider credentialing submitted to a health plan company on or after January 1, 2022.

 

ARTICLE 7

TELEHEALTH

 

Section 1.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 256J.08, subdivision 21, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 21.  Date of application.  "Date of application" means the date on which the county agency receives an applicant's signed application as a signed written application, an application submitted by telephone, or an application submitted through Internet telepresence.

 

Sec. 2.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 256J.09, subdivision 3, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 3.  Submitting application form.  (a) A county agency must offer, in person or by mail, the application forms prescribed by the commissioner as soon as a person makes a written or oral inquiry.  At that time, the county agency must:


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(1) inform the person that assistance begins with on the date that the signed application is received by the county agency either as a signed written application; an application submitted by telephone; or an application submitted through Internet telepresence; or on the date that all eligibility criteria are met, whichever is later;

 

(2) inform a person that the person may submit the application by telephone or through Internet telepresence;

 

(3) inform a person that when the person submits the application by telephone or through Internet telepresence, the county agency must receive a signed written application within 30 days of the date that the person submitted the application by telephone or through Internet telepresence;

 

(2) (4) inform the person that any delay in submitting the application will reduce the amount of assistance paid for the month of application;

 

(3) (5) inform a person that the person may submit the application before an interview;

 

(4) (6) explain the information that will be verified during the application process by the county agency as provided in section 256J.32;

 

(5) (7) inform a person about the county agency's average application processing time and explain how the application will be processed under subdivision 5;

 

(6) (8) explain how to contact the county agency if a person's application information changes and how to withdraw the application;

 

(7) (9) inform a person that the next step in the application process is an interview and what a person must do if the application is approved including, but not limited to, attending orientation under section 256J.45 and complying with employment and training services requirements in sections 256J.515 to 256J.57;

 

(8) (10) inform the person that the an interview must be conducted.  The interview may be conducted face‑to‑face in the county office or at a location mutually agreed upon, through Internet telepresence, or at a location mutually agreed upon by telephone;

 

(9) inform a person who has received MFIP or DWP in the past 12 months of the option to have a face-to-face, Internet telepresence, or telephone interview;

 

(10) (11) explain the child care and transportation services that are available under paragraph (c) to enable caregivers to attend the interview, screening, and orientation; and

 

(11) (12) identify any language barriers and arrange for translation assistance during appointments, including, but not limited to, screening under subdivision 3a, orientation under section 256J.45, and assessment under section 256J.521.

 

(b) Upon receipt of a signed application, the county agency must stamp the date of receipt on the face of the application.  The county agency must process the application within the time period required under subdivision 5.  An applicant may withdraw the application at any time by giving written or oral notice to the county agency.  The county agency must issue a written notice confirming the withdrawal.  The notice must inform the applicant of the county agency's understanding that the applicant has withdrawn the application and no longer wants to pursue it.  When, within ten days of the date of the agency's notice, an applicant informs a county agency, in writing, that the applicant does not wish to withdraw the application, the county agency must reinstate the application and finish processing the application.


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(c) Upon a participant's request, the county agency must arrange for transportation and child care or reimburse the participant for transportation and child care expenses necessary to enable participants to attend the screening under subdivision 3a and orientation under section 256J.45.

 

Sec. 3.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 256J.45, subdivision 1, is amended to read:

 

Subdivision 1.  County agency to provide orientation.  A county agency must provide a face-to-face an orientation to each MFIP caregiver unless the caregiver is:

 

(1) a single parent, or one parent in a two-parent family, employed at least 35 hours per week; or

 

(2) a second parent in a two-parent family who is employed for 20 or more hours per week provided the first parent is employed at least 35 hours per week.

 

The county agency must inform caregivers who are not exempt under clause (1) or (2) that failure to attend the orientation is considered an occurrence of noncompliance with program requirements, and will result in the imposition of a sanction under section 256J.46.  If the client complies with the orientation requirement prior to the first day of the month in which the grant reduction is proposed to occur, the orientation sanction shall be lifted.

 

Sec. 4.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 256J.95, subdivision 5, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 5.  Submitting application form.  The eligibility date for the diversionary work program begins with on the date that the signed combined application form (CAF) is received by the county agency either as a signed written application; an application submitted by telephone; or an application submitted through Internet telepresence; or on the date that diversionary work program eligibility criteria are met, whichever is later.  The county agency must inform an applicant that when the applicant submits the application by telephone or through Internet telepresence, the county agency must receive a signed written application within 30 days of the date that the applicant submitted the application by telephone or through Internet telepresence.  The county agency must inform the applicant that any delay in submitting the application will reduce the benefits paid for the month of application.  The county agency must inform a person that an application may be submitted before the person has an interview appointment.  Upon receipt of a signed application, the county agency must stamp the date of receipt on the face of the application.  The applicant may withdraw the application at any time prior to approval by giving written or oral notice to the county agency.  The county agency must follow the notice requirements in section 256J.09, subdivision 3, when issuing a notice confirming the withdrawal.

 

ARTICLE 8

ECONOMIC SUPPORTS

 

Section 1.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 256E.34, subdivision 1, is amended to read:

 

Subdivision 1.  Distribution of appropriation.  The commissioner must distribute funds appropriated to the commissioner by law for that purpose to Hunger Solutions, a statewide association of food shelves organized as a nonprofit corporation as defined under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, to distribute to qualifying food shelves.  A food shelf qualifies under this section if:

 

(1) it is a nonprofit corporation, or is affiliated with a nonprofit corporation, as defined in section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 or a federally recognized Tribal nation;

 

(2) it distributes standard food orders without charge to needy individuals.  The standard food order must consist of at least a two-day supply or six pounds per person of nutritionally balanced food items;


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(3) it does not limit food distributions to individuals of a particular religious affiliation, race, or other criteria unrelated to need or to requirements necessary to administration of a fair and orderly distribution system;

 

(4) it does not use the money received or the food distribution program to foster or advance religious or political views; and

 

(5) it has a stable address and directly serves individuals.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective July 1, 2021.

 

Sec. 2.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 256J.30, subdivision 8, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 8.  Late MFIP household report forms.  (a) Paragraphs (b) to (e) apply to the reporting requirements in subdivision 7.

 

(b) When the county agency receives an incomplete MFIP household report form, the county agency must immediately return the incomplete form and clearly state what the caregiver must do for the form to be complete contact the caregiver by phone or in writing to acquire the necessary information to complete the form.

 

(c) The automated eligibility system must send a notice of proposed termination of assistance to the assistance unit if a complete MFIP household report form is not received by a county agency.  The automated notice must be mailed to the caregiver by approximately the 16th of the month.  When a caregiver submits an incomplete form on or after the date a notice of proposed termination has been sent, the termination is valid unless the caregiver submits a complete form before the end of the month.

 

(d) An assistance unit required to submit an MFIP household report form is considered to have continued its application for assistance if a complete MFIP household report form is received within a calendar month after the month in which the form was due and assistance shall be paid for the period beginning with the first day of that calendar month.

 

(e) A county agency must allow good cause exemptions from the reporting requirements under subdivision 5 when any of the following factors cause a caregiver to fail to provide the county agency with a completed MFIP household report form before the end of the month in which the form is due:

 

(1) an employer delays completion of employment verification;

 

(2) a county agency does not help a caregiver complete the MFIP household report form when the caregiver asks for help;

 

(3) a caregiver does not receive an MFIP household report form due to mistake on the part of the department or the county agency or due to a reported change in address;

 

(4) a caregiver is ill, or physically or mentally incapacitated; or

 

(5) some other circumstance occurs that a caregiver could not avoid with reasonable care which prevents the caregiver from providing a completed MFIP household report form before the end of the month in which the form is due.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective July 1, 2021.


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Sec. 3.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 256J.626, subdivision 1, is amended to read:

 

Subdivision 1.  Consolidated fund.  The consolidated fund is established to support counties and tribes in meeting their duties under this chapter.  Counties and tribes must use funds from the consolidated fund to develop programs and services that are designed to improve participant outcomes as measured in section 256J.751, subdivision 2.  Counties and tribes that administer MFIP eligibility may use the funds for any allowable expenditures under subdivision 2, including case management.  Tribes that do not administer MFIP eligibility may use the funds for any allowable expenditures under subdivision 2, including case management, except those in subdivision 2, paragraph (a), clauses (1) and (6).  All payments made through the MFIP consolidated fund to support a caregiver's pursuit of greater economic stability does not count when determining a family's available income.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective July 1, 2021.

 

ARTICLE 9

CHILD PROTECTION

 

Section 1.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 256N.02, subdivision 16, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 16.  Permanent legal and physical custody.  "Permanent legal and physical custody" means:  (1) a full transfer of permanent legal and physical custody of a child ordered by a Minnesota juvenile court under section 260C.515, subdivision 4, to a relative ordered by a Minnesota juvenile court under section 260C.515, subdivision 4, who is not the child's parent as defined in section 260C.007, subdivision 25; or (2) for a child under jurisdiction of a tribal court, a judicial determination under a similar provision in tribal code which means that a relative will assume the duty and authority to provide care, control, and protection of a child who is residing in foster care, and to make decisions regarding the child's education, health care, and general welfare until adulthood.  To establish eligibility for Northstar kinship assistance, permanent legal and physical custody does not include joint legal custody, joint physical custody, or joint legal and joint physical custody of a child shared by the child's parent and relative custodian.

 

Sec. 2.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 256N.02, subdivision 17, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 17.  Reassessment.  "Reassessment" means an update of a previous assessment through the process under section 256N.24 for a child who has been continuously eligible for Northstar Care for Children, or when a child identified as an at-risk child (Level A) under guardianship or adoption assistance has manifested the disability upon which eligibility for the agreement was based according to section 256N.25, subdivision 3, paragraph (b).  A reassessment may be used to update an initial assessment, a special assessment, or a previous reassessment.

 

Sec. 3.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 256N.22, subdivision 1, is amended to read:

 

Subdivision 1.  General eligibility requirements.  (a) To be eligible for Northstar kinship assistance under this section, there must be a judicial determination under section 260C.515, subdivision 4, that a transfer of permanent legal and physical custody to a relative who is not the child's parent is in the child's best interest.  For a child under jurisdiction of a tribal court, a judicial determination under a similar provision in tribal code indicating that a relative will assume the duty and authority to provide care, control, and protection of a child who is residing in foster care, and to make decisions regarding the child's education, health care, and general welfare until adulthood, and that this is in the child's best interest is considered equivalent.  A child whose parent shares legal, physical, or legal and physical custody of the child with a relative custodian is not eligible for Northstar kinship assistance.  Additionally, a child must:

 

(1) have been removed from the child's home pursuant to a voluntary placement agreement or court order;

 

(2)(i) have resided with the prospective relative custodian who has been a licensed child foster parent for at least six consecutive months; or


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(ii) have received from the commissioner an exemption from the requirement in item (i) that the prospective relative custodian has been a licensed child foster parent for at least six consecutive months, based on a determination that:

 

(A) an expedited move to permanency is in the child's best interest;

 

(B) expedited permanency cannot be completed without provision of Northstar kinship assistance;

 

(C) the prospective relative custodian is uniquely qualified to meet the child's needs, as defined in section 260C.212, subdivision 2, on a permanent basis;

 

(D) the child and prospective relative custodian meet the eligibility requirements of this section; and

 

(E) efforts were made by the legally responsible agency to place the child with the prospective relative custodian as a licensed child foster parent for six consecutive months before permanency, or an explanation why these efforts were not in the child's best interests;

 

(3) meet the agency determinations regarding permanency requirements in subdivision 2;

 

(4) meet the applicable citizenship and immigration requirements in subdivision 3;

 

(5) have been consulted regarding the proposed transfer of permanent legal and physical custody to a relative, if the child is at least 14 years of age or is expected to attain 14 years of age prior to the transfer of permanent legal and physical custody; and

 

(6) have a written, binding agreement under section 256N.25 among the caregiver or caregivers, the financially responsible agency, and the commissioner established prior to transfer of permanent legal and physical custody.

 

(b) In addition to the requirements in paragraph (a), the child's prospective relative custodian or custodians must meet the applicable background study requirements in subdivision 4.

 

(c) To be eligible for title IV-E Northstar kinship assistance, a child must also meet any additional criteria in section 473(d) of the Social Security Act.  The sibling of a child who meets the criteria for title IV-E Northstar kinship assistance in section 473(d) of the Social Security Act is eligible for title IV-E Northstar kinship assistance if the child and sibling are placed with the same prospective relative custodian or custodians, and the legally responsible agency, relatives, and commissioner agree on the appropriateness of the arrangement for the sibling.  A child who meets all eligibility criteria except those specific to title IV-E Northstar kinship assistance is entitled to Northstar kinship assistance paid through funds other than title IV-E.

 

Sec. 4.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 256N.23, subdivision 2, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 2.  Special needs determination.  (a) A child is considered a child with special needs under this section if the requirements in paragraphs (b) to (g) are met.

 

(b) There must be a determination that the child must not or should not be returned to the home of the child's parents as evidenced by:

 

(1) a court-ordered termination of parental rights;

 

(2) a petition to terminate parental rights;

 

(3) consent of the child's parent to adoption accepted by the court under chapter 260C or, in the case of a child receiving Northstar kinship assistance payments under section 256N.22, consent of the child's parent to the child's adoption executed under chapter 259;


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(4) in circumstances when tribal law permits the child to be adopted without a termination of parental rights, a judicial determination by a tribal court indicating the valid reason why the child cannot or should not return home;

 

(5) a voluntary relinquishment under section 259.25 or 259.47 or, if relinquishment occurred in another state, the applicable laws in that state; or

 

(6) the death of the legal parent or parents if the child has two legal parents.

 

(c) There exists a specific factor or condition of which it is reasonable to conclude that the child cannot be placed with adoptive parents without providing adoption assistance as evidenced by:

 

(1) a determination by the Social Security Administration that the child meets all medical or disability requirements of title XVI of the Social Security Act with respect to eligibility for Supplemental Security Income benefits;

 

(2) a documented physical, mental, emotional, or behavioral disability not covered under clause (1);

 

(3) a member of a sibling group being adopted at the same time by the same parent;

 

(4) an adoptive placement in the home of a parent who previously adopted a sibling for whom they receive adoption assistance; or

 

(5) documentation that the child is an at-risk child.

 

(d) A reasonable but unsuccessful effort must have been made to place the child with adoptive parents without providing adoption assistance as evidenced by:

 

(1) a documented search for an appropriate adoptive placement; or

 

(2) a determination by the commissioner that a search under clause (1) is not in the best interests of the child.

 

(e) The requirement for a documented search for an appropriate adoptive placement under paragraph (d), including the registration of the child with the state adoption exchange and other recruitment methods under paragraph (f), must be waived if:

 

(1) the child is being adopted by a relative and it is determined by the child-placing agency that adoption by the relative is in the best interests of the child;

 

(2) the child is being adopted by a foster parent with whom the child has developed significant emotional ties while in the foster parent's care as a foster child and it is determined by the child-placing agency that adoption by the foster parent is in the best interests of the child; or

 

(3) the child is being adopted by a parent that previously adopted a sibling of the child, and it is determined by the child-placing agency that adoption by this parent is in the best interests of the child.

 

For an Indian child covered by the Indian Child Welfare Act, a waiver must not be granted unless the child‑placing agency has complied with the placement preferences required by the Indian Child Welfare Act, United States Code, title 25, section 1915(a).

 

(f) To meet the requirement of a documented search for an appropriate adoptive placement under paragraph (d), clause (1), the child-placing agency minimally must:


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(1) conduct a relative search as required by section 260C.221 and give consideration to placement with a relative, as required by section 260C.212, subdivision 2;

 

(2) comply with the placement preferences required by the Indian Child Welfare Act when the Indian Child Welfare Act, United States Code, title 25, section 1915(a), applies;

 

(3) locate prospective adoptive families by registering the child on the state adoption exchange, as required under section 259.75; and

 

(4) if registration with the state adoption exchange does not result in the identification of an appropriate adoptive placement, the agency must employ additional recruitment methods prescribed by the commissioner.

 

(g) Once the legally responsible agency has determined that placement with an identified parent is in the child's best interests and made full written disclosure about the child's social and medical history, the agency must ask the prospective adoptive parent if the prospective adoptive parent is willing to adopt the child without receiving adoption assistance under this section.  If the identified parent is either unwilling or unable to adopt the child without adoption assistance, the legally responsible agency must provide documentation as prescribed by the commissioner to fulfill the requirement to make a reasonable effort to place the child without adoption assistance.  If the identified parent is willing to adopt the child without adoption assistance, the parent must provide a written statement to this effect to the legally responsible agency and the statement must be maintained in the permanent adoption record of the legally responsible agency.  For children under guardianship of the commissioner, the legally responsible agency shall submit a copy of this statement to the commissioner to be maintained in the permanent adoption record.

 

Sec. 5.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 256N.23, subdivision 6, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 6.  Exclusions.  The commissioner must not enter into an adoption assistance agreement with the following individuals:

 

(1) a child's biological parent or stepparent;

 

(2) a child's relative under section 260C.007, subdivision 26b or 27, with whom the child resided immediately prior to child welfare involvement unless:

 

(i) the child was in the custody of a Minnesota county or tribal agency pursuant to an order under chapter 260C or equivalent provisions of tribal code and the agency had placement and care responsibility for permanency planning for the child; and

 

(ii) the child is under guardianship of the commissioner of human services according to the requirements of section 260C.325, subdivision 1 or 3, or is a ward of a Minnesota tribal court after termination of parental rights, suspension of parental rights, or a finding by the tribal court that the child cannot safely return to the care of the parent;

 

(3) an individual adopting a child who is the subject of a direct adoptive placement under section 259.47 or the equivalent in tribal code;

 

(4) a child's legal custodian or guardian who is now adopting the child, except for a relative custodian as defined in section 256N.02, subdivision 19, who is currently receiving Northstar kinship assistance benefits on behalf of the child; or

 

(5) an individual who is adopting a child who is not a citizen or resident of the United States and was either adopted in another country or brought to the United States for the purposes of adoption.


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Sec. 6.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 256N.24, subdivision 1, is amended to read:

 

Subdivision 1.  Assessment.  (a) Each child eligible under sections 256N.21, 256N.22, and 256N.23, must be assessed to determine the benefits the child may receive under section 256N.26, in accordance with the assessment tool, process, and requirements specified in subdivision 2.

 

(b) If an agency applies the emergency foster care rate for initial placement under section 256N.26, the agency may wait up to 30 days to complete the initial assessment.

 

(c) Unless otherwise specified in paragraph (d), a child must be assessed at the basic level, level B, or one of ten supplemental difficulty of care levels, levels C to L.

 

(d) An assessment must not be completed for:

 

(1) a child eligible for Northstar kinship assistance under section 256N.22 or adoption assistance under section 256N.23 who is determined to be an at-risk child.  A child under this clause must be assigned level A under section 256N.26, subdivision 1; and

 

(2) a child transitioning into Northstar Care for Children under section 256N.28, subdivision 7, unless the commissioner determines an assessment is appropriate.

 

Sec. 7.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 256N.24, subdivision 8, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 8.  Completing the special assessment.  (a) The special assessment must be completed in consultation with the child's caregiver.  Face-to-face contact with the caregiver is not required to complete the special assessment.

 

(b) If a new special assessment is required prior to the effective date of the Northstar kinship assistance agreement, it must be completed by the financially responsible agency, in consultation with the legally responsible agency if different.  If the prospective relative custodian is unable or unwilling to cooperate with the special assessment process, the child shall be assigned the basic level, level B under section 256N.26, subdivision 3, unless the child is known to be an at-risk child, in which case, the child shall be assigned level A under section 256N.26, subdivision 1.

 

(c) If a special assessment is required prior to the effective date of the adoption assistance agreement, it must be completed by the financially responsible agency, in consultation with the legally responsible agency if different.  If there is no financially responsible agency, the special assessment must be completed by the agency designated by the commissioner.  If the prospective adoptive parent is unable or unwilling to cooperate with the special assessment process, the child must be assigned the basic level, level B under section 256N.26, subdivision 3, unless the child is known to be an at-risk child, in which case, the child shall be assigned level A under section 256N.26, subdivision 1.

 

(d) Notice to the prospective relative custodians or prospective adoptive parents must be provided as specified in subdivision 13.

 

Sec. 8.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 256N.24, subdivision 11, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 11.  Completion of reassessment.  (a) The reassessment must be completed in consultation with the child's caregiver.  Face-to-face contact with the caregiver is not required to complete the reassessment.

 

(b) For foster children eligible under section 256N.21, reassessments must be completed by the financially responsible agency, in consultation with the legally responsible agency if different.


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(c) If reassessment is required after the effective date of the Northstar kinship assistance agreement, the reassessment must be completed by the financially responsible agency.

 

(d) If a reassessment is required after the effective date of the adoption assistance agreement, it must be completed by the financially responsible agency or, if there is no financially responsible agency, the agency designated by the commissioner.

 

(e) If the child's caregiver is unable or unwilling to cooperate with the reassessment, the child must be assessed at level B under section 256N.26, subdivision 3, unless the child has an a Northstar adoption assistance or Northstar kinship assistance agreement in place and is known to be an at-risk child, in which case the child must be assessed at level A under section 256N.26, subdivision 1.

 

Sec. 9.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 256N.24, subdivision 12, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 12.  Approval of initial assessments, special assessments, and reassessments.  (a) Any agency completing initial assessments, special assessments, or reassessments must designate one or more supervisors or other staff to examine and approve assessments completed by others in the agency under subdivision 2.  The person approving an assessment must not be the case manager or staff member completing that assessment.

 

(b) In cases where a special assessment or reassessment for guardian Northstar kinship assistance and adoption assistance is required under subdivision 8 or 11, the commissioner shall review and approve the assessment as part of the eligibility determination process outlined in section 256N.22, subdivision 7, for Northstar kinship assistance, or section 256N.23, subdivision 7, for adoption assistance.  The assessment determines the maximum for of the negotiated agreement amount under section 256N.25.

 

(c) The new rate is effective the calendar month that the assessment is approved, or the effective date of the agreement, whichever is later.

 

Sec. 10.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 256N.24, subdivision 14, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 14.  Assessment tool determines rate of benefits.  The assessment tool established by the commissioner in subdivision 2 determines the monthly benefit level for children in foster care.  The monthly payment for guardian Northstar kinship assistance or adoption assistance may be negotiated up to the monthly benefit level under foster care for those children eligible for a payment under section 256N.26, subdivision 1.

 

Sec. 11.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 256N.25, subdivision 1, is amended to read:

 

Subdivision 1.  Agreement; Northstar kinship assistance; adoption assistance.  (a) In order to receive Northstar kinship assistance or adoption assistance benefits on behalf of an eligible child, a written, binding agreement between the caregiver or caregivers, the financially responsible agency, or, if there is no financially responsible agency, the agency designated by the commissioner, and the commissioner must be established prior to finalization of the adoption or a transfer of permanent legal and physical custody.  The agreement must be negotiated with the caregiver or caregivers under subdivision 2 and renegotiated under subdivision 3, if applicable.

 

(b) The agreement must be on a form approved by the commissioner and must specify the following:

 

(1) duration of the agreement;

 

(2) the nature and amount of any payment, services, and assistance to be provided under such agreement;

 

(3) the child's eligibility for Medicaid services;


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(4) the terms of the payment, including any child care portion as specified in section 256N.24, subdivision 3;

 

(5) eligibility for reimbursement of nonrecurring expenses associated with adopting or obtaining permanent legal and physical custody of the child, to the extent that the total cost does not exceed $2,000 per child pursuant to subdivision 1a;

 

(6) that the agreement must remain in effect regardless of the state of which the adoptive parents or relative custodians are residents at any given time;

 

(7) provisions for modification of the terms of the agreement, including renegotiation of the agreement;

 

(8) the effective date of the agreement; and

 

(9) the successor relative custodian or custodians for Northstar kinship assistance, when applicable.  The successor relative custodian or custodians may be added or changed by mutual agreement under subdivision 3.

 

(c) The caregivers, the commissioner, and the financially responsible agency, or, if there is no financially responsible agency, the agency designated by the commissioner, must sign the agreement.  A copy of the signed agreement must be given to each party.  Once signed by all parties, the commissioner shall maintain the official record of the agreement.

 

(d) The effective date of the Northstar kinship assistance agreement must be the date of the court order that transfers permanent legal and physical custody to the relative.  The effective date of the adoption assistance agreement is the date of the finalized adoption decree.

 

(e) Termination or disruption of the preadoptive placement or the foster care placement prior to assignment of custody makes the agreement with that caregiver void.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective August 1, 2021.

 

Sec. 12.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 256N.25, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

 

Subd. 1a.  Reimbursement of nonrecurring expenses.  (a) The commissioner of human services must reimburse a relative custodian with a fully executed Northstar kinship assistance benefit agreement for costs that the relative custodian incurs while seeking permanent legal and physical custody of a child who is the subject of a Northstar kinship assistance benefit agreement.  The commissioner must reimburse a relative custodian for expenses that are reasonable and necessary that the relative incurs during the transfer of permanent legal and physical custody of a child to the relative custodian, subject to a maximum of $2,000.  To be eligible for reimbursement, the expenses must directly relate to the legal transfer of permanent legal and physical custody of the child to the relative custodian, must not have been incurred by the relative custodian in violation of state or federal law, and must not have been reimbursed from other sources or funds.  The relative custodian must submit reimbursement requests to the commissioner within 21 months of the date of the child's finalized transfer of permanent legal and physical custody, and the relative custodian must follow all requirements and procedures that the commissioner prescribes.

 

(b) The commissioner of human services must reimburse an adoptive parent for costs that the adoptive parent incurs in an adoption of a child with special needs according to section 256N.23, subdivision 2.  The commissioner must reimburse an adoptive parent for expenses that are reasonable and necessary for the adoption of the child to occur, subject to a maximum of $2,000.  To be eligible for reimbursement, the expenses must directly relate to the legal adoption of the child, must not have been incurred by the adoptive parent in violation of state or federal law, and must not have been reimbursed from other sources or funds.


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(1) Children who have special needs but who are not citizens or residents of the United States and were either adopted in another country or brought to this country for the purposes of adoption are categorically ineligible for the reimbursement program in this section, except when the child meets the eligibility criteria in this section after the dissolution of the child's international adoption.

 

(2) An adoptive parent, in consultation with the responsible child-placing agency, may request reimbursement of nonrecurring adoption expenses by submitting a complete application to the commissioner that follows the commissioner's requirements and procedures on forms that the commissioner prescribes.

 

(3) The commissioner must determine a child's eligibility for adoption expense reimbursement under title IV-E of the Social Security Act, United States Code, title 42, sections 670 to 679c.  If the commissioner determines that a child is eligible, the commissioner of human services must fully execute the agreement for nonrecurring adoption expense reimbursement by signing the agreement.  For a child to be eligible, the commissioner must have fully executed the agreement for nonrecurring adoption expense reimbursement prior to finalizing a child's adoption.

 

(4) An adoptive parent who has a fully executed Northstar adoption assistance agreement is not required to submit a separate application for reimbursement of nonrecurring adoption expenses for the child who is the subject of the Northstar adoption assistance agreement.

 

(5) If the commissioner has determined the child to be eligible, the adoptive parent must submit reimbursement requests to the commissioner within 21 months of the date of the child's adoption decree, and the adoptive parent must follow requirements and procedures that the commissioner prescribes.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective August 1, 2021.

 

Sec. 13.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 259.22, subdivision 4, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 4.  Time for filing petition.  A petition shall be filed not later than 12 months after a child is placed in a prospective adoptive home.  If a petition is not filed by that time, the agency that placed the child, or, in a direct adoptive placement, the agency that is supervising the placement shall file with the district court in the county where the prospective adoptive parent resides a motion for an order and a report recommending one of the following:

 

(1) that the time for filing a petition be extended because of the child's special needs as defined under title IV-E of the Social Security Act, United States Code, title 42, section 673;

 

(2) that, based on a written plan for completing filing of the petition, including a specific timeline, to which the prospective adoptive parents have agreed, the time for filing a petition be extended long enough to complete the plan because such an extension is in the best interests of the child and additional time is needed for the child to adjust to the adoptive home; or

 

(3) that the child be removed from the prospective adoptive home.

 

The prospective adoptive parent must reimburse an agency for the cost of preparing and filing the motion and report under this section, unless the costs are reimbursed by the commissioner under section 259.73 or 259A.70 256N.25, subdivision 1a.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective August 1, 2021.


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Sec. 14.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 259.35, subdivision 1, is amended to read:

 

Subdivision 1.  Parental responsibilities.  Prior to commencing an investigation of the suitability of proposed adoptive parents, a child-placing agency shall give the individuals the following written notice in all capital letters at least one-eighth inch high:

 

"Minnesota Statutes, section 259.59, provides that upon legally adopting a child, adoptive parents assume all the rights and responsibilities of birth parents.  The responsibilities include providing for the child's financial support and caring for health, emotional, and behavioral problems.  Except for subsidized adoptions under Minnesota Statutes, chapter 259A 256N, or any other provisions of law that expressly apply to adoptive parents and children, adoptive parents are not eligible for state or federal financial subsidies besides those that a birth parent would be eligible to receive for a child.  Adoptive parents may not terminate their parental rights to a legally adopted child for a reason that would not apply to a birth parent seeking to terminate rights to a child.  An individual who takes guardianship of a child for the purpose of adopting the child shall, upon taking guardianship from the child's country of origin, assume all the rights and responsibilities of birth and adoptive parents as stated in this paragraph."

 

Sec. 15.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 259.73, is amended to read:

 

259.73 REIMBURSEMENT OF NONRECURRING ADOPTION EXPENSES.

 

An individual may apply for reimbursement for costs incurred in an adoption of a child with special needs under section 259A.70 256N.25, subdivision 1a.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective August 1, 2021.

 

ARTICLE 10

CHILD PROTECTION POLICY

 

Section 1.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 245.4885, subdivision 1, is amended to read:

 

Subdivision 1.  Admission criteria.  (a) Prior to admission or placement, except in the case of an emergency, all children referred for treatment of severe emotional disturbance in a treatment foster care setting, residential treatment facility, or informally admitted to a regional treatment center shall undergo an assessment to determine the appropriate level of care if public funds are used to pay for the child's services.

 

(b) The responsible social services agency shall determine the appropriate level of care for a child when county‑controlled funds are used to pay for the child's services or placement in a qualified residential treatment facility under chapter 260C and licensed by the commissioner under chapter 245A.  In accordance with section 260C.157, a juvenile treatment screening team shall conduct a screening of a child before the team may recommend whether to place a child in a qualified residential treatment program as defined in section 260C.007, subdivision 26d.  When a social services agency does not have responsibility for a child's placement and the child is enrolled in a prepaid health program under section 256B.69, the enrolled child's contracted health plan must determine the appropriate level of care for the child.  When Indian Health Services funds or funds of a tribally owned facility funded under the Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act, Public Law 93-638, are to be used for a child, the Indian Health Services or 638 tribal health facility must determine the appropriate level of care for the child.  When more than one entity bears responsibility for a child's coverage, the entities shall coordinate level of care determination activities for the child to the extent possible.

 

(c) The responsible social services agency must make the child's level of care determination available to the child's juvenile treatment screening team, as permitted under chapter 13.  The level of care determination shall inform the juvenile treatment screening team process and the assessment in section 260C.704 when considering


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whether to place the child in a qualified residential treatment program.  When the responsible social services agency is not involved in determining a child's placement, the child's level of care determination shall determine whether the proposed treatment:

 

(1) is necessary;

 

(2) is appropriate to the child's individual treatment needs;

 

(3) cannot be effectively provided in the child's home; and

 

(4) provides a length of stay as short as possible consistent with the individual child's need needs.

 

(d) When a level of care determination is conducted, the responsible social services agency or other entity may not determine that a screening of a child under section 260C.157 or referral or admission to a treatment foster care setting or residential treatment facility is not appropriate solely because services were not first provided to the child in a less restrictive setting and the child failed to make progress toward or meet treatment goals in the less restrictive setting.  The level of care determination must be based on a diagnostic assessment of a child that includes a functional assessment which evaluates the child's family, school, and community living situations; and an assessment of the child's need for care out of the home using a validated tool which assesses a child's functional status and assigns an appropriate level of care to the child.  The validated tool must be approved by the commissioner of human services and may be the validated tool approved for the child's assessment under section 260C.704 if the juvenile treatment screening team recommended placement of the child in a qualified residential treatment program.  If a diagnostic assessment including a functional assessment has been completed by a mental health professional within the past 180 days, a new diagnostic assessment need not be completed unless in the opinion of the current treating mental health professional the child's mental health status has changed markedly since the assessment was completed.  The child's parent shall be notified if an assessment will not be completed and of the reasons.  A copy of the notice shall be placed in the child's file.  Recommendations developed as part of the level of care determination process shall include specific community services needed by the child and, if appropriate, the child's family, and shall indicate whether or not these services are available and accessible to the child and the child's family.

 

(e) During the level of care determination process, the child, child's family, or child's legal representative, as appropriate, must be informed of the child's eligibility for case management services and family community support services and that an individual family community support plan is being developed by the case manager, if assigned.

 

(f) When the responsible social services agency has authority, the agency must engage the child's parents in case planning under sections 260C.212 and 260C.708 and chapter 260D unless a court terminates the parent's rights or court orders restrict the parent from participating in case planning, visitation, or parental responsibilities.

 

(g) The level of care determination, and placement decision, and recommendations for mental health services must be documented in the child's record, as required in chapter chapters 260C and 260D.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective September 30, 2021.

 

Sec. 2.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 245A.02, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

 

Subd. 3c.  At risk of becoming a victim of sex trafficking or commercial sexual exploitation.  For the purposes of section 245A.25, a youth who is "at risk of becoming a victim of sex trafficking or commercial sexual exploitation" means a youth who meets the criteria established by the commissioner of human services for this purpose.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective the day following final enactment.


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Sec. 3.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 245A.02, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

 

Subd. 4a.  Children's residential facility.  "Children's residential facility" means a residential program licensed under this chapter or chapter 241 according to the applicable standards in Minnesota Rules, parts 2960.0010 to 2960.0710.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective the day following final enactment.

 

Sec. 4.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 245A.02, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

 

Subd. 6d.  Foster family setting.  "Foster family setting" has the meaning given in Minnesota Rules, part 2960.3010, subpart 23, and includes settings licensed by the commissioner of human services or the commissioner of corrections.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective the day following final enactment.

 

Sec. 5.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 245A.02, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

 

Subd. 6e.  Foster residence setting.  "Foster residence setting" has the meaning given in Minnesota Rules, part 2960.3010, subpart 26, and includes settings licensed by the commissioner of human services or the commissioner of corrections.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective the day following final enactment.

 

Sec. 6.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 245A.02, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

 

Subd. 18a.  Trauma.  For the purposes of section 245A.25, "trauma" means an event, series of events, or set of circumstances experienced by an individual as physically or emotionally harmful or life-threatening and has lasting adverse effects on the individual's functioning and mental, physical, social, emotional, or spiritual well-being.  Trauma includes the cumulative emotional or psychological harm of group traumatic experiences transmitted across generations within a community that are often associated with racial and ethnic population groups that have suffered major intergenerational losses.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective the day following final enactment.

 

Sec. 7.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 245A.02, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

 

Subd. 23.  Victim of sex trafficking or commercial sexual exploitation.  For the purposes of section 245A.25, "victim of sex trafficking or commercial sexual exploitation" means a person who meets the definitions in section 260C.007, subdivision 31, clauses (4) and (5).

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective the day following final enactment.

 

Sec. 8.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 245A.02, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

 

Subd. 24.  Youth.  For the purposes of section 245A.25, "youth" means a child as defined in section 260C.007, subdivision 4, and includes individuals under 21 years of age who are in foster care pursuant to section 260C.451.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective the day following final enactment.


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Sec. 9.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 245A.041, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

 

Subd. 5.  First date of working in a facility or setting; documentation requirements.  Children's residential facility and foster residence setting license holders must document the first date that a person who is a background study subject begins working in the license holder's facility or setting.  If the license holder does not maintain documentation of each background study subject's first date of working in the facility or setting in the license holder's personnel files, the license holder must provide documentation to the commissioner that contains the first date that each background study subject began working in the license holder's program upon the commissioner's request.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective August 1, 2021.

 

Sec. 10.  [245A.25] RESIDENTIAL PROGRAM CERTIFICATIONS FOR COMPLIANCE WITH THE FAMILY FIRST PREVENTION SERVICES ACT.

 

Subdivision 1.  Certification scope and applicability.  (a) This section establishes the requirements that a children's residential facility or child foster residence setting must meet to be certified for the purposes of Title IV-E funding requirements as:

 

(1) a qualified residential treatment program;

 

(2) a residential setting specializing in providing care and supportive services for youth who have been or are at risk of becoming victims of sex trafficking or commercial sexual exploitation;

 

(3) a residential setting specializing in providing prenatal, postpartum, or parenting support for youth; or

 

(4) a supervised independent living setting for youth who are 18 years of age or older.

 

(b) This section does not apply to a foster family setting in which the license holder resides in the foster home.

 

(c) Children's residential facilities licensed as detention settings according to Minnesota Rules, parts 2960.0230 to 2960.0290, or secure programs according to Minnesota Rules, parts 2960.0300 to 2960.0420, may not be certified under this section.

 

(d) For purposes of this section, "license holder" means an individual, organization, or government entity that was issued a children's residential facility or foster residence setting license by the commissioner of human services under this chapter or by the commissioner of corrections under chapter 241.

 

(e) Certifications issued under this section for foster residence settings may only be issued by the commissioner of human services and are not delegated to county or private licensing agencies under section 245A.16.

 

Subd. 2.  Program certification types and requests for certification.  (a) By July 1, 2021, the commissioner of human services must offer certifications to license holders for the following types of programs:

 

(1) qualified residential treatment programs;

 

(2) residential settings specializing in providing care and supportive services for youth who have been or are at risk of becoming victims of sex trafficking or commercial sexual exploitation;

 

(3) residential settings specializing in providing prenatal, postpartum, or parenting support for youth; and

 

(4) supervised independent living settings for youth who are 18 years of age or older.


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(b) An applicant or license holder must submit a request for certification under this section on a form and in a manner prescribed by the commissioner of human services.  The decision of the commissioner of human services to grant or deny a certification request is final and not subject to appeal under chapter 14.

 

Subd. 3.  Trauma-informed care.  (a) Programs certified under subdivision 4 or 5 must provide services to a person according to a trauma-informed model of care that meets the requirements of this subdivision, except that programs certified under subdivision 5 are not required to meet the requirements of paragraph (e).

 

(b) For the purposes of this section, "trauma-informed care" means care that:

 

(1) acknowledges the effects of trauma on a person receiving services and on the person's family;

 

(2) modifies services to respond to the effects of trauma on the person receiving services;

 

(3) emphasizes skill and strength-building rather than symptom management; and

 

(4) focuses on the physical and psychological safety of the person receiving services and the person's family.

 

(c) The license holder must have a process for identifying the signs and symptoms of trauma in a youth and must address the youth's needs related to trauma.  This process must include:

 

(1) screening for trauma by completing a trauma-specific screening tool with each youth upon the youth's admission or obtaining the results of a trauma-specific screening tool that was completed with the youth within 30 days prior to the youth's admission to the program; and

 

(2) ensuring that trauma-based interventions targeting specific trauma-related symptoms are available to each youth when needed to assist the youth in obtaining services.  For qualified residential treatment programs, this must include the provision of services in paragraph (e).

 

(d) The license holder must develop and provide services to each youth according to the principles of trauma‑informed care including:

 

(1) recognizing the impact of trauma on a youth when determining the youth's service needs and providing services to the youth;

 

(2) allowing each youth to participate in reviewing and developing the youth's individualized treatment or service plan;

 

(3) providing services to each youth that are person-centered and culturally responsive; and

 

(4) adjusting services for each youth to address additional needs of the youth.

 

(e) In addition to the other requirements of this subdivision, qualified residential treatment programs must use a trauma-based treatment model that includes:

 

(1) assessing each youth to determine if the youth needs trauma-specific treatment interventions;

 

(2) identifying in each youth's treatment plan how the program will provide trauma-specific treatment interventions to the youth;

 

(3) providing trauma-specific treatment interventions to a youth that target the youth's specific trauma-related symptoms; and


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(4) training all clinical staff of the program on trauma-specific treatment interventions.

 

(f) At the license holder's program, the license holder must provide a physical, social, and emotional environment that:

 

(1) promotes the physical and psychological safety of each youth;

 

(2) avoids aspects that may be retraumatizing;

 

(3) responds to trauma experienced by each youth and the youth's other needs; and

 

(4) includes designated spaces that are available to each youth for engaging in sensory and self-soothing activities.