Journal of the House - 21st Day - Monday, March 8, 2021 - Top of Page 829

STATE OF MINNESOTA

 

Journal of the House

 

NINETY-SECOND SESSION - 2021

 

_____________________

 

TWENTY-FIRST DAY

 

Saint Paul, Minnesota, Monday, March 8, 2021

 

 

      The House of Representatives convened at 3:30 p.m. and was called to order by Melissa Hortman, Speaker of the House.

 

      Prayer was offered by the Reverend Patricia J. Lull, Bishop for the Saint Paul Area Synod of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America.

 

      The members of the House gave the pledge of allegiance to the flag of the United States of America.

 

      The roll was called and the following members were present:

 


Acomb

Agbaje

Akland

Albright

Anderson

Backer

Bahner

Bahr

Baker

Becker-Finn

Bennett

Berg

Bernardy

Bierman

Bliss

Boe

Boldon

Burkel

Carlson

Christensen

Daniels

Daudt

Davids

Davnie

Demuth

Dettmer

Drazkowski

Ecklund

Edelson

Elkins

Erickson

Feist

Fischer

Franke

Franson

Frazier

Frederick

Freiberg

Garofalo

Gomez

Green

Greenman

Gruenhagen

Haley

Hamilton

Hansen, R.

Hanson, J.

Hassan

Hausman

Heinrich

Heintzeman

Her

Hertaus

Hollins

Hornstein

Howard

Huot

Igo

Johnson

Jordan

Jurgens

Keeler

Kiel

Klevorn

Koegel

Kotyza-Witthuhn

Koznick

Kresha

Lee

Liebling

Lillie

Lippert

Lislegard

Long

Lucero

Lueck

Mariani

Marquart

Masin

McDonald

Mekeland

Moller

Moran

Morrison

Mortensen

Mueller

Munson

Murphy

Nash

Nelson, M.

Nelson, N.

Neu Brindley

Noor

Novotny

O'Driscoll

Olson, B.

Olson, L.

O'Neill

Pelowski

Petersburg

Pfarr

Pierson

Pinto

Poston

Pryor

Quam

Raleigh

Rasmusson

Reyer

Richardson

Robbins

Sandell

Schomacker

Schultz

Scott

Stephenson

Sundin

Swedzinski

Theis

Thompson

Torkelson

Urdahl

Vang

Wazlawik

West

Winkler

Wolgamott

Xiong, J.

Xiong, T.

Youakim

Spk. Hortman


 

      A quorum was present.

 

      Grossell, Miller and Sandstede were excused.

 

      The Chief Clerk proceeded to read the Journal of the preceding day.  There being no objection, further reading of the Journal was dispensed with and the Journal was approved as corrected by the Chief Clerk.


Journal of the House - 21st Day - Monday, March 8, 2021 - Top of Page 830

REPORTS OF CHIEF CLERK

 

      S. F. No. 1091 and H. F. No. 738, which had been referred to the Chief Clerk for comparison, were examined and found to be identical.

 

      Haley moved that S. F. No. 1091 be substituted for H. F. No. 738 and that the House File be indefinitely postponed.  The motion prevailed.

 

 

REPORTS OF STANDING COMMITTEES AND DIVISIONS

 

 

Hansen, R., from the Committee on Environment and Natural Resources Finance and Policy to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 75, A bill for an act relating to forfeiture; limiting vehicles and other property subject to forfeiture; providing for recovery of property by innocent owners; modifying participation in the federal equitable sharing program; requiring reports; appropriating money; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, sections 169A.63, subdivisions 1, 7, 8, 9, 10, 13, by adding subdivisions; 609.531, subdivision 1, by adding a subdivision; 609.5311, subdivisions 2, 3, 4; 609.5314, subdivisions 1, 2, 3, by adding a subdivision; 609.5315, subdivisions 5, 5b, 6; repealing Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 609.5317.

 

Reported the same back with the following amendments:

 

Page 7, line 2, delete "driver" and insert "person arrested when the property was seized"

 

Page 7, line 8, delete "vehicle" and insert "above-described property" and delete "driver" and insert "person arrested when the property was seized"

 

Page 26, line 4, before the period, insert "and reports under paragraph (c) shall be made on an annual basis in a manner prescribed by the state auditor"

 

 

With the recommendation that when so amended the bill be re-referred to the Committee on Ways and Means.

 

      The report was adopted.

 

 

Stephenson from the Committee on Commerce Finance and Policy to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 79, A bill for an act relating to environment; regulating use of certain chemicals in food packaging; requiring rulemaking; appropriating money; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 325F.

 

Reported the same back with the recommendation that the bill be re-referred to the Committee on Environment and Natural Resources Finance and Policy.

 

      The report was adopted.


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Stephenson from the Committee on Commerce Finance and Policy to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 80, A bill for an act relating to agriculture; extending the Farmer-Lender Mediation Act; increasing the period of time that creditors cannot enforce eligible debts; increasing the mediation period; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, sections 583.215; 583.26, subdivisions 4, 5, 8; 583.27, subdivision 3.

 

Reported the same back with the recommendation that the bill be re-referred to the Committee on Agriculture Finance and Policy.

 

      The report was adopted.

 

 

Stephenson from the Committee on Commerce Finance and Policy to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 112, A bill for an act relating to housing; providing residents an opportunity to purchase manufactured home parks; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 327C; repealing Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 327C.096.

 

Reported the same back with the recommendation that the bill be placed on the General Register.

 

 

      A separate vote was requested on the adoption of the Report from the Committee on Commerce Finance and Policy relating to H. F. No. 112.

 

 

      The question was taken on the adoption of the Report from the Committee on Commerce Finance and Policy relating to H. F. No. 112.

 

 

      The Report from the Committee on Commerce Finance and Policy relating to H. F. No. 112 was adopted.

 

 

Hornstein from the Committee on Transportation Finance and Policy to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 162, A bill for an act relating to homeless youth; establishing procedures for issuance of birth records and Minnesota identification cards to homeless youth; classifying certain data; appropriating money; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, sections 144.212, by adding a subdivision; 144.225, subdivisions 2, 7; 144.226, by adding a subdivision; 171.07, by adding a subdivision; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 144.

 

Reported the same back with the recommendation that the bill be re-referred to the Committee on Health Finance and Policy.

 

      The report was adopted.

 

 

Becker-Finn from the Committee on Judiciary Finance and Civil Law to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 167, A bill for an act relating to judiciary; modifying requirement for presentence investigation and written report; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, sections 244.10, subdivision 1; 609.115, subdivisions 1, 2, 8.

 

Reported the same back with the following amendments:

 

Page 1, line 14, delete "requested" and insert "ordered"


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Page 1, delete section 2 and insert:

 

"Sec. 2.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 609.115, subdivision 1, is amended to read:

 

Subdivision 1.  Presentence investigation.  (a) When a defendant has been convicted of a misdemeanor or gross misdemeanor, the court may, and when the defendant has been convicted of a felony, the court shall, ordered by the court before sentence is imposed, cause a presentence investigation and written report to shall be made to the court concerning the defendant's individual characteristics, circumstances, needs, potentialities, criminal record and social history, the circumstances of the offense and the harm caused by it to others and to the community.  At the request of the prosecutor in a gross misdemeanor case, The court shall order that a presentence investigation and report be prepared.:

 

(1) when a defendant has been convicted of a felony violation of section 609.2242 (domestic assault); 609.2247 (domestic assault by strangulation); 609.322 (sex trafficking); 609.324, subdivision 1 (hiring a minor to engage in prostitution); 609.342 (first-degree criminal sexual conduct); 609.343 (second-degree criminal sexual conduct); 609.344 (third-degree criminal sexual conduct); 609.345 (fourth-degree criminal sexual conduct); 609.352 (solicitation of children to engage in sexual conduct); 609.713 (threats of violence); 609.748, subdivision 6 (violation of harassment restraining order); 609.749 (harassment or stalking); 609.78, subdivision 2 (interference with an emergency call); or 629.75 (violation of domestic abuse no contact order);

 

(2) when a defendant intends to present evidence and argument in support of a mitigated departure during a sentencing hearing, the prosecuting attorney gives notice under section 244.10, subdivision 4, of the intent to bring a motion for an aggravated sentence, or the court intends to consider a mitigated departure from the sentencing guidelines; or

 

(3) at the request of a prosecutor or defendant in a felony or gross misdemeanor case.

 

The court may order that a presentence investigation and report be prepared when a defendant has been convicted of a misdemeanor, gross misdemeanor, or any felony not listed in clause (1).  The investigation shall be made by a probation officer of the court, if there is one; otherwise it shall be made by the commissioner of corrections.  The officer conducting the presentence or predispositional investigation shall make reasonable and good faith efforts to contact and provide the victim with the information required under section 611A.037, subdivision 2.  Presentence investigations shall be conducted and summary hearings held upon reports and upon the sentence to be imposed upon the defendant in accordance with this section, section 244.10, and the Rules of Criminal Procedure.

 

(b) When the crime is a violation of sections 609.561 to 609.563, 609.5641, or 609.576 and involves a fire, the report shall include a description of the financial and physical harm the offense has had on the public safety personnel who responded to the fire.  For purposes of this paragraph, "public safety personnel" means the state fire marshal; employees of the Division of the State Fire Marshal; firefighters, regardless of whether the firefighters receive any remuneration for providing services; peace officers, as defined in section 626.05, subdivision 2; individuals providing emergency management services; and individuals providing emergency medical services.

 

(c) When the crime is a felony violation of chapter 152 involving the sale or distribution of a controlled substance, the report may include a description of any adverse social or economic effects the offense has had on persons who reside in the neighborhood where the offense was committed.

 

(d) The report shall also include the information relating to crime victims required under section 611A.037, subdivision 1.  If the court directs, the report shall include an estimate of the prospects of the defendant's rehabilitation and recommendations as to the sentence which should be imposed.  In misdemeanor cases the report may be oral.


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(e) When a defendant has been convicted of a felony, and before sentencing, the court shall cause a sentencing worksheet to be completed to facilitate the application of the Minnesota Sentencing Guidelines.  The worksheet shall be prepared by a probation officer of the court, if there is one, or by the commissioner of corrections and shall be submitted as before sentencing.  The worksheet may be made part of the presentence investigation report, if a report is ordered.

 

(f) When a person is convicted of a felony for which the Sentencing Guidelines presume that the defendant will be committed to the commissioner of corrections under an executed sentence and no motion for a sentencing departure has been made by counsel, the court may, when there is no space available in the local correctional facility, commit the defendant to the custody of the commissioner of corrections, pending completion of the presentence investigation and report, if a presentence investigation and report are ordered.  When a defendant is convicted of a felony for which the Sentencing Guidelines do not presume that the defendant will be committed to the commissioner of corrections, or for which the Sentencing Guidelines presume commitment to the commissioner but counsel has moved for a sentencing departure, the court may commit the defendant to the commissioner with the consent of the commissioner, pending completion of the presentence investigation and report, if a presentence investigation and report are ordered.  The county of commitment shall return the defendant to the court when the court so orders.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective August 1, 2021, and applies to presentence investigations conducted on or after that date."

 

Page 3, line 21, delete "requested" and insert "ordered"

 

Page 3, line 26, delete "requested" and insert "ordered"

 

 

With the recommendation that when so amended the bill be re-referred to the Committee on Public Safety and Criminal Justice Reform Finance and Policy.

 

      The report was adopted.

 

 

Lee from the Committee on Capital Investment to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 203, A bill for an act relating to housing; refunding deposits to bond issuers on applications for bonding authority allocations from the 2020 housing pool.

 

Reported the same back with the recommendation that the bill be re-referred to the Committee on Housing Finance and Policy.

 

      The report was adopted.

 

 

Becker-Finn from the Committee on Judiciary Finance and Civil Law to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 398, A bill for an act relating to housing; amending the covenants implied in a residential lease; providing for tenants remedies against landlords for repairs; allowing a tenant to request emergency repairs from the court; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, sections 504B.161, subdivision 1; 504B.375, subdivision 1; 504B.381, subdivisions 1, 5, by adding a subdivision.

 

Reported the same back with the recommendation that the bill be placed on the General Register.

 

      The report was adopted.


Journal of the House - 21st Day - Monday, March 8, 2021 - Top of Page 834

Becker-Finn from the Committee on Judiciary Finance and Civil Law to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 399, A bill for an act relating to housing; prohibiting landlords from imposing certain fees; restricting entry by a landlord and amending fees for improper entry; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 504B.211, subdivisions 2, 6; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 504B.

 

Reported the same back with the recommendation that the bill be placed on the General Register.

 

      The report was adopted.

 

 

Becker-Finn from the Committee on Judiciary Finance and Civil Law to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 400, A bill for an act relating to civil law; landlord and tenant; establishing termination of lease upon infirmity of tenant; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 504B.

 

Reported the same back with the following amendments:

 

Page 3, after line 11, insert:

 

"Subd. 5.  Other laws.  Nothing in this section affects the rights or remedies available in this chapter or other law, including but not limited to chapter 363A."

 

 

With the recommendation that when so amended the bill be placed on the General Register.

 

      The report was adopted.

 

 

Davnie from the Committee on Education Finance to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 486, A bill for an act relating to education finance; appropriating money for suicide prevention training for teachers.

 

Reported the same back with the following amendments:

 

Page 1, lines 6 and 7, delete "Education" and insert "Health"

 

Page 1, line 16, delete "education" and insert "health"

 

Page 1, line 22, after "education" insert "and suicide prevention"

 

Amend the title as follows:

 

Page 1, line 2, delete "education finance" and insert "health"

 

 

With the recommendation that when so amended the bill be re-referred to the Committee on Health Finance and Policy.

 

      The report was adopted.


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Becker-Finn from the Committee on Judiciary Finance and Civil Law to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 526, A bill for an act relating to health; changing access to birth and death records; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 144.225, subdivision 7.

 

Reported the same back with the recommendation that the bill be re-referred to the Committee on Health Finance and Policy.

 

      The report was adopted.

 

 

Hausman from the Committee on Housing Finance and Policy to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 566, A bill for an act relating to housing; permitting a landlord to require a tenant to provide documentation supporting the tenant's need for a service or support animal; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, sections 256C.02; 363A.09, subdivision 5; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 504B.

 

Reported the same back with the following amendments:

 

Page 3, after line 6, insert:

 

"(g) "Disability" has the meaning given in section 363A.03, subdivision 12."

 

 

With the recommendation that when so amended the bill be placed on the General Register.

 

      The report was adopted.

 

 

Noor from the Committee on Workforce and Business Development Finance and Policy to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 600, A bill for an act relating to cannabis; establishing the Cannabis Management Board; establishing advisory councils; requiring reports relating to cannabis use and sales; legalizing and limiting the possession and use of cannabis by adults; providing for the licensing, inspection, and regulation of cannabis businesses; requiring testing of cannabis and cannabis products; requiring labeling of cannabis and cannabis products; limiting the advertisement of cannabis, cannabis products, and cannabis businesses; providing for the cultivation of cannabis in private residences; transferring regulatory authority for the medical cannabis program; taxing the sale of adult-use cannabis; establishing grant and loan programs; amending criminal penalties; establishing expungement procedures for certain individuals; establishing labor standards for the use of cannabis by employees and testing of employees; creating a civil cause of action for certain nuisances; amending the scheduling of marijuana and tetrahydrocannabinols; classifying data; appropriating money; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, sections 13.411, by adding a subdivision; 13.871, by adding a subdivision; 152.02, subdivisions 2, 4; 152.022, subdivisions 1, 2; 152.023, subdivisions 1, 2; 152.024, subdivision 1; 152.025, subdivisions 1, 2; 181.938, subdivision 2; 181.950, subdivisions 2, 4, 5, 8, 13, by adding a subdivision; 181.951, by adding subdivisions; 181.952, by adding a subdivision; 181.953, by adding a subdivision; 181.955; 181.957, subdivision 1; 244.05, subdivision 2; 256.01, subdivision 18c; 256D.024, subdivision 1; 256J.26, subdivision 1; 290.0132, subdivision 29; 290.0134, subdivision 19; 297A.61, subdivision 12; 609.135, subdivision 1; 609.531, subdivision 1; 609.5311, subdivision 1; 609.5314, subdivision 1; 609.5316, subdivision 2; 609.5317, subdivision 1; 609A.01; 609A.03, subdivisions 5, 9; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapters 17; 28A; 34A; 116J; 116L; 120B; 144; 152; 295; 604; 609A; proposing coding for new law as Minnesota Statutes, chapter 342; repealing Minnesota Statutes 2020, sections 152.027, subdivisions 3, 4; 152.22, subdivisions 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 5a, 5b, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14; 152.23; 152.24;


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152.25, subdivisions 1, 1a, 1b, 1c, 2, 3, 4; 152.26; 152.261; 152.27, subdivisions 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7; 152.28, subdivisions 1, 2, 3; 152.29, subdivisions 1, 2, 3, 3a, 4; 152.30; 152.31; 152.32, subdivisions 1, 2, 3; 152.33, subdivisions 1, 1a, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6; 152.34; 152.35; 152.36, subdivisions 1, 1a, 2, 3, 4, 5; 152.37; Minnesota Rules, parts 4770.0100; 4770.0200; 4770.0300; 4770.0400; 4770.0500; 4770.0600; 4770.0800; 4770.0900; 4770.1000; 4770.1100; 4770.1200; 4770.1300; 4770.1400; 4770.1460; 4770.1500; 4770.1600; 4770.1700; 4770.1800; 4770.1900; 4770.2000; 4770.2100; 4770.2200; 4770.2300; 4770.2400; 4770.2700; 4770.2800; 4770.4000; 4770.4002; 4770.4003; 4770.4004; 4770.4005; 4770.4007; 4770.4008; 4770.4009; 4770.4010; 4770.4012; 4770.4013; 4770.4014; 4770.4015; 4770.4016; 4770.4017; 4770.4018; 4770.4030.

 

Reported the same back with the following amendments:

 

Page 17, line 26, delete "CanGrow, and" and insert "and CanGrow"

 

Page 17, line 27, delete "CanLearn"

 

Page 103, line 32, delete "plus four percent"

 

Page 104, line 11, delete "may be paid out of the interest earned on loans" and insert "are eligible program expenses the commissioner may agree to pay under the grant agreement"

 

Page 107, line 2, delete "plus four percent"

 

Page 107, line 13, delete "may be paid out of the interest earned on loans" and insert "are eligible program expenses the commissioner may agree to pay under the grant agreement"

 

Page 107, line 19, delete "January 15" and insert "February 1"

 

Page 107, line 29, delete "February 15" and insert "March 1" and delete "February 15" and insert "March 1"

 

Page 142, delete line 22 and insert: 

 

"(1) is impaired from cannabis;"

 

Page 144, delete section 16 and insert:

 

"Sec. 16.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 181.953, is amended to read:

 

181.953 RELIABILITY AND FAIRNESS SAFEGUARDS.

 

Subdivision 1.  Use of licensed, accredited, or certified laboratory required.  (a) An employer who requests or requires an employee or job applicant to undergo drug or alcohol testing or cannabis testing shall use the services of a testing laboratory that meets one of the following criteria for drug testing:

 

(1) is certified by the National Institute on Drug Abuse as meeting the mandatory guidelines published at 53 Federal Register 11970 to 11989, April 11, 1988;

 

(2) is accredited by the College of American Pathologists, 325 Waukegan Road, Northfield, Illinois, 60093‑2750, under the forensic urine drug testing laboratory program; or

 

(3) is licensed to test for drugs by the state of New York, Department of Health, under Public Health Law, article 5, title V, and rules adopted under that law.


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(b) For alcohol testing, the laboratory must either be:

 

(1) licensed to test for drugs and alcohol by the state of New York, Department of Health, under Public Health Law, article 5, title V, and the rules adopted under that law; or

 

(2) accredited by the College of American Pathologists, 325 Waukegan Road, Northfield, Illinois, 60093-2750, in the laboratory accreditation program.

 

Subd. 3.  Laboratory testing, reporting, and sample retention requirements.  A testing laboratory that is not certified by the National Institute on Drug Abuse according to subdivision 1 shall follow the chain-of-custody procedures prescribed for employers in subdivision 5.  A testing laboratory shall conduct a confirmatory test on all samples that produced a positive test result on an initial screening test.  A laboratory shall disclose to the employer a written test result report for each sample tested within three working days after a negative test result on an initial screening test or, when the initial screening test produced a positive test result, within three working days after a confirmatory test.  A test report must indicate the drugs, alcohol, or drug or alcohol metabolites, or cannabis or cannabis metabolites tested for and whether the test produced negative or positive test results.  A laboratory shall retain and properly store for at least six months all samples that produced a positive test result.

 

Subd. 4.  Prohibitions on employers.  An employer may not conduct drug or alcohol testing or cannabis testing of its own employees and job applicants using a testing laboratory owned and operated by the employer; except that, one agency of the state may test the employees of another agency of the state.  Except as provided in subdivision 9, an employer may not request or require an employee or job applicant to contribute to, or pay the cost of, drug or alcohol testing or cannabis testing under sections 181.950 to 181.954.

 

Subd. 5.  Employer chain-of-custody procedures.  An employer shall establish its own reliable chain‑of‑custody procedures to ensure proper record keeping, handling, labeling, and identification of the samples to be tested.  The procedures must require the following:

 

(1) possession of a sample must be traceable to the employee from whom the sample is collected, from the time the sample is collected through the time the sample is delivered to the laboratory;

 

(2) the sample must always be in the possession of, must always be in view of, or must be placed in a secured area by a person authorized to handle the sample;

 

(3) a sample must be accompanied by a written chain-of-custody record; and

 

(4) individuals relinquishing or accepting possession of the sample must record the time the possession of the sample was transferred and must sign and date the chain-of-custody record at the time of transfer.

 

Subd. 6.  Rights of employees and job applicants.  (a) Before requesting an employee or job applicant to undergo drug or alcohol testing or requesting cannabis testing, an employer shall provide the employee or job applicant with a form, developed by the employer, on which to acknowledge that the employee or job applicant has seen the employer's drug and alcohol testing or cannabis testing policy.

 

(b) If an employee or job applicant tests positive for drug use or cannabis use, the employee must be given written notice of the right to explain the positive test and the employer may request that the employee or job applicant indicate any over-the-counter or prescription medication that the individual is currently taking or has recently taken and any other information relevant to the reliability of, or explanation for, a positive test result.

 

(c) Within three working days after notice of a positive test result on a confirmatory test, the employee or job applicant may submit information to the employer, in addition to any information already submitted under paragraph (b), to explain that result, or may request a confirmatory retest of the original sample at the employee's or job applicant's own expense as provided under subdivision 9.


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Subd. 7.  Notice of test results.  Within three working days after receipt of a test result report from the testing laboratory, an employer shall inform in writing an employee or job applicant who has undergone drug or alcohol testing or cannabis testing of (1) a negative test result on an initial screening test or of a negative or positive test result on a confirmatory test and (2) the right provided in subdivision 8.  In the case of a positive test result on a confirmatory test, the employer shall also, at the time of this notice, inform the employee or job applicant in writing of the rights provided in subdivisions 6, paragraph (b), 9, and either subdivision 10 or 11, whichever applies.

 

Subd. 8.  Right to test result report.  An employee or job applicant has the right to request and receive from the employer a copy of the test result report on any drug or alcohol test or cannabis test.

 

Subd. 9.  Confirmatory retests.  An employee or job applicant may request a confirmatory retest of the original sample at the employee's or job applicant's own expense after notice of a positive test result on a confirmatory test.  Within five working days after notice of the confirmatory test result, the employee or job applicant shall notify the employer in writing of the employee's or job applicant's intention to obtain a confirmatory retest.  Within three working days after receipt of the notice, the employer shall notify the original testing laboratory that the employee or job applicant has requested the laboratory to conduct the confirmatory retest or transfer the sample to another laboratory licensed under subdivision 1 to conduct the confirmatory retest.  The original testing laboratory shall ensure that the chain-of-custody procedures in subdivision 3 are followed during transfer of the sample to the other laboratory.  The confirmatory retest must use the same drug or alcohol or cannabis testing threshold detection levels as used in the original confirmatory test.  If the confirmatory retest does not confirm the original positive test result, no adverse personnel action based on the original confirmatory test may be taken against the employee or job applicant.

 

Subd. 10.  Limitations on employee discharge, discipline, or discrimination.  (a) An employer may not discharge, discipline, discriminate against, or request or require rehabilitation of an employee on the basis of a positive test result from an initial screening test that has not been verified by a confirmatory test.

 

(b) In addition to the limitation under paragraph (a), an employer may not discharge an employee for whom a positive test result on a confirmatory test was the first such result for the employee on a drug or alcohol test or cannabis test requested by the employer unless the following conditions have been met:

 

(1) the employer has first given the employee an opportunity to participate in, at the employee's own expense or pursuant to coverage under an employee benefit plan, either a drug or, alcohol, or cannabis counseling or rehabilitation program, whichever is more appropriate, as determined by the employer after consultation with a certified chemical use counselor or a physician trained in the diagnosis and treatment of chemical dependency; and

 

(2) the employee has either refused to participate in the counseling or rehabilitation program or has failed to successfully complete the program, as evidenced by withdrawal from the program before its completion or by a positive test result on a confirmatory test after completion of the program.

 

(c) Notwithstanding paragraph (a), an employer may temporarily suspend the tested employee or transfer that employee to another position at the same rate of pay pending the outcome of the confirmatory test and, if requested, the confirmatory retest, provided the employer believes that it is reasonably necessary to protect the health or safety of the employee, coemployees, or the public.  An employee who has been suspended without pay must be reinstated with back pay if the outcome of the confirmatory test or requested confirmatory retest is negative.

 

(d) An employer may not discharge, discipline, discriminate against, or request or require rehabilitation of an employee on the basis of medical history information revealed to the employer pursuant to subdivision 6 unless the employee was under an affirmative duty to provide the information before, upon, or after hire.


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(e) An employee must be given access to information in the employee's personnel file relating to positive test result reports and other information acquired in the drug and alcohol testing or cannabis testing process and conclusions drawn from and actions taken based on the reports or other acquired information.

 

Subd. 10a.  Additional limitations for cannabis.  An employer may discipline, discharge, or take other adverse personnel action against an employee for cannabis use, possession, impairment, sale, or transfer while an employee is working, on the employer's premises, or operating the employer's vehicle, machinery, or equipment as follows:

 

(1) if an employee is impaired from cannabis;

 

(2) if cannabis testing requested or required pursuant to section 181.951, subdivision 8, paragraphs (d) and (e), verifies the presence of cannabis following a confirmatory test;

 

(3) as provided in the employer's written work rules for cannabis and cannabis testing, provided that the rules are in writing and contained in a written policy that contains the minimum information required by section 181.952; or

 

(4) as otherwise authorized under state or federal law.

 

Subd. 11.  Limitation on withdrawal of job offer.  If a job applicant has received a job offer made contingent on the applicant passing drug and alcohol testing, the employer may not withdraw the offer based on a positive test result from an initial screening test that has not been verified by a confirmatory test.

 

Sec. 17.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 181.954, is amended to read:

 

181.954 PRIVACY, CONFIDENTIALITY, AND PRIVILEGE SAFEGUARDS.

 

Subdivision 1.  Privacy limitations.  A laboratory may only disclose to the employer test result data regarding the presence or absence of drugs, alcohol, cannabis, or their metabolites in a sample tested.

 

Subd. 2.  Confidentiality limitations.  Test result reports and other information acquired in the drug or alcohol testing or cannabis testing process are, with respect to private sector employees and job applicants, private and confidential information, and, with respect to public sector employees and job applicants, private data on individuals as that phrase is defined in chapter 13, and may not be disclosed by an employer or laboratory to another employer or to a third-party individual, governmental agency, or private organization without the written consent of the employee or job applicant tested.

 

Subd. 3.  Exceptions to privacy and confidentiality disclosure limitations.  Notwithstanding subdivisions 1 and 2, evidence of a positive test result on a confirmatory test may be:  (1) used in an arbitration proceeding pursuant to a collective bargaining agreement, an administrative hearing under chapter 43A or other applicable state or local law, or a judicial proceeding, provided that information is relevant to the hearing or proceeding; (2) disclosed to any federal agency or other unit of the United States government as required under federal law, regulation, or order, or in accordance with compliance requirements of a federal government contract; and (3) disclosed to a substance abuse treatment facility for the purpose of evaluation or treatment of the employee.

 

Subd. 4.  Privilege.  Positive test results from an employer drug or alcohol testing or cannabis testing program may not be used as evidence in a criminal action against the employee or job applicant tested."


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Page 172, after line 11, insert:

 

"Subd. 9.  Department of Employment and Economic Development.  $7,400,000 in fiscal year 2022 and $3,700,000 in fiscal year 2023 are appropriated from the general fund to the commissioner of employment and economic development for the CanStartup, CanNavigate, and CanTrain programs.  Of these amounts, up to three percent may be used for administrative expenses."

 

Renumber the sections in sequence

 

Amend the title as follows:

 

Correct the title numbers accordingly

 

 

With the recommendation that when so amended the bill be re-referred to the Committee on Agriculture Finance and Policy.

 

      The report was adopted.

 

 

Hansen, R., from the Committee on Environment and Natural Resources Finance and Policy to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 639, A bill for an act relating to clean water; appropriating money for the reinvest in Minnesota reserve program.

 

Reported the same back with the following amendments:

 

Delete everything after the enacting clause and insert:

 

"Section 1.  CLEAN WATER FUND APPROPRIATIONS. 

 

The sums shown in the columns marked "Appropriations" are appropriated to the agencies and for the purposes specified in this act.  The appropriations are from the clean water fund and are available for the fiscal years indicated for allowable activities under the Minnesota Constitution, article XI, section 15.  The figures "2022" and "2023" used in this act mean that the appropriations listed under the figure are available for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2022, or June 30, 2023, respectively.  "The first year" is fiscal year 2022.  "The second year" is fiscal year 2023.  "The biennium" is fiscal years 2022 and 2023.  These are onetime appropriations.

 

 

 

 

APPROPRIATIONS

 

 

 

Available for the Year

 

 

 

Ending June 30

 

 

 

2022

2023

 

Sec. 2.  CLEAN WATER FUND

 

 

 

 

 

Subdivision 1.  Total Appropriation

 

$126,711,000

 

$130,081,000

 

This appropriation is from the clean water fund.  The amounts that may be spent for each purpose are specified in the following sections.


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Subd. 2.  Availability of Appropriation

 

 

 

 

 

Money appropriated in this act may not be spent on activities unless they are directly related to and necessary for a specific appropriation.  Money appropriated in this act must be spent in accordance with Minnesota Management and Budget MMB Guidance to Agencies on Legacy Fund Expenditure.  Notwithstanding Minnesota Statutes, section 16A.28, and unless otherwise specified in this act, fiscal year 2022 appropriations are available until June 30, 2023, and fiscal year 2023 appropriations are available until June 30, 2024.  If a project receives federal funds, the period of the appropriation is extended to equal the availability of federal funding.

 

Subd. 3.  Disability Access

 

 

 

 

 

Where appropriate, grant recipients of clean water funds, in consultation with the Council on Disability and other appropriate governor-appointed disability councils, boards, committees, and commissions, should make progress toward providing people with disabilities greater access to programs, print publications, and digital media related to the programs the recipient funds using appropriations made in this act.

 

Sec. 3.  DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

 

$10,144,000

 

$10,144,000

 

(a) $350,000 the first year and $350,000 the second year are to increase monitoring for pesticides, pesticide degradates, microplastics, and nanoplastics in surface water and groundwater and to use data collected to assess pesticide use practices.  This appropriation is available until June 30, 2025.

 

(b) $2,503,000 the first year and $2,503,000 the second year are for monitoring and evaluating trends in the concentration of nitrate in groundwater in areas vulnerable to groundwater degradation; promoting, developing, and evaluating regional and crop-specific nutrient best management practices; assessing adoption of best management practices; education and technical support from University of Minnesota Extension; grants to support agricultural demonstration and implementation activities, including research activities at the Rosholt Research Farm; and other actions to protect groundwater from degradation from nitrate.  This appropriation is available until June 30, 2026.

 

(c) $75,000 the first year and $75,000 the second year are for administering clean water funds managed through the agriculture best management practices loan program.  Any unencumbered balance at the end of the second year must be added to the corpus of the loan fund.


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(d) $1,452,000 the first year and $1,452,000 the second year are for technical assistance, research, and demonstration projects on properly implementing best management practices and more‑precise information on nonpoint contributions to impaired waters and for grants to support on-farm demonstration of agricultural practices.  This appropriation is available until June 30, 2026.

 

(e) $40,000 the first year and $40,000 the second year are for maintenance of the Minnesota Water Research Digital Library.  Costs for information technology development or support for the digital library may be paid to the Office of MN.IT Services.  This appropriation is available until June 30, 2026.

 

(f) $3,000,000 the first year and $3,000,000 the second year are to implement the Minnesota agricultural water quality certification program statewide.  This appropriation is available until June 30, 2026.

 

(g) $135,000 the first year and $135,000 the second year are for a regional irrigation water quality specialist through University of Minnesota Extension.  This appropriation is available until June 30, 2025.

 

(h) $2,250,000 the first year and $2,250,000 the second year are for grants to fund the Forever Green agriculture initiative and to protect the state's natural resources by incorporating perennial and winter-annual crops into existing agricultural practices.  This appropriation is available until June 30, 2026.

 

(i) $339,000 the first year and $339,000 the second year are for testing private wells for pesticides, microplastics, and nanoplastics where nitrate is detected as part of the township testing program.  This appropriation is available until June 30, 2026.

 

Sec. 4.  POLLUTION CONTROL AGENCY

 

$21,411,000

 

$22,426,000

 

(a) $7,216,000 the first year and $7,216,000 the second year are for completing needed statewide assessments of surface water quality and trends, including assessments for microplastics and nanoplastics, according to Minnesota Statutes, chapter 114D.

 

(b) $6,604,000 the first year and $6,604,000 the second year are to develop watershed restoration and protection strategies (WRAPS), which include total maximum daily load (TMDL) studies and TMDL implementation plans according to Minnesota Statutes, chapter 114D, for waters on the impaired waters list approved by the United States Environmental Protection Agency.  The agency must complete an average of ten percent of the TMDLs each year over the biennium.


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(c) $950,000 the first year and $950,000 the second year are for groundwater assessment, including assessments for microplastics and nanoplastics, enhancing the ambient monitoring network, modeling, evaluating trends, and reassessing groundwater that was assessed ten to 15 years ago and found to be contaminated.

 

(d) $750,000 the first year and $750,000 the second year are for implementing the St. Louis River System Area of Concern Remedial Action Plan.

 

(e) $900,000 the first year and $900,000 the second year are for national pollutant discharge elimination system wastewater and stormwater TMDL implementation efforts.

 

(f) $2,662,000 the first year and $2,662,000 the second year are for enhancing the county-level delivery systems for subsurface sewage treatment system (SSTS) activities necessary to implement Minnesota Statutes, sections 115.55 and 115.56, for protecting groundwater.  This appropriation includes base grants for all counties with SSTS programs and competitive grants to counties with specific plans to significantly reduce water pollution by reducing the number of systems that are an imminent threat to public health or safety or are otherwise failing.  Counties that receive base grants must report the number of properties with noncompliant systems upgraded through an SSTS replacement, connection to a centralized sewer system, or other means, including property abandonment or buyout.  Counties also must report the number of existing SSTS compliance inspections conducted in areas under county jurisdiction.  The required reports must be part of the established annual reporting for SSTS programs.  Of this amount, at least $900,000 each year is available to counties for grants to low-income landowners to address systems that pose an imminent threat to public health or safety or fail to protect groundwater.  A grant awarded under this paragraph may not exceed $40,000 annually.  A county receiving a grant under this paragraph must submit a report to the agency listing the projects funded, including an account of the expenditures.  By January 15 of each odd-numbered year, the commissioner must submit a report to the chairs and ranking minority members of the legislative committees and divisions with jurisdiction over environment and natural resources and the clean water fund detailing the outcomes achieved under this paragraph for the previous two years.

 

(g) $200,000 the first year and $200,000 the second year are for accelerated implementation of municipal separate storm sewer system (MS4) permit requirements, including additional technical assistance to municipalities experiencing difficulties understanding and implementing the basic requirements of the municipal stormwater program.


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(h) $700,000 the first year and $700,000 the second year are for a grant program for sanitary sewer projects that are included in the draft or any updated Voyageurs National Park Clean Water Project Comprehensive Plan to restore the water quality of waters in Voyageurs National Park.  Grants must be awarded to local government units for projects approved by the Voyageurs National Park Clean Water Joint Powers Board and must be matched by at least 25 percent from sources other than the clean water fund.

 

(i) $260,000 the first year and $260,000 the second year are for activities, training, and grants that reduce chloride pollution.

 

(j) $500,000 the first year and $500,000 the second year are to support activities of the Clean Water Council according to Minnesota Statutes, section 114D.30, subdivision 1.  The council may use money appropriated in this paragraph for consultants and other assistance as needed to develop the reports required under this act.

 

(k) $669,000 the first year and $1,684,000 the second year are to develop protocols for testing groundwater and surface water for microplastics and nanoplastics to be used by agencies and departments required to monitor and test for plastics under this act and to begin testing and implementation.  For the purposes of this act, "microplastics" are small pieces of plastic debris in the environment resulting from the disposal and breakdown of consumer products and industrial waste that are less than five millimeters in length and "nanoplastics" are particles within a size ranging from one to 1000 nanometers that are unintentionally produced from the manufacture or degradation of plastic objects and that exhibit a colloidal behavior.

 

(l) Any unencumbered grant balances in the first year do not cancel but are available for grants in the second year.  Notwithstanding Minnesota Statutes, section 16A.28, the appropriations in this section are available until June 30, 2026.

 

Sec. 5.  DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES

$9,030,000

 

$8,671,000

 

(a) $2,000,000 the first year and $2,000,000 the second year are for streamflow monitoring.

 

(b) $1,000,000 the first year and $1,000,000 the second year are for lake Index of Biological Integrity (IBI) assessments, including assessments for microplastics and nanoplastics.

 

(c) $70,000 the first year and $66,000 the second year are for assessing mercury, microplastics, and nanoplastics, and other fish contaminants, including monitoring to track the status of impaired waters over time.


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(d) $1,900,000 the first year and $1,900,000 the second year are for developing targeted, science-based watershed restoration and protection strategies.

 

(e) $1,850,000 the first year and $1,850,000 the second year are for water-supply planning, aquifer protection, and monitoring activities and analysis.

 

(f) $1,300,000 the first year and $1,300,000 the second year are for technical assistance to support local implementation of nonpoint source restoration and protection activities.

 

(g) $535,000 the first year and $530,000 the second year are for applied research and tools, including watershed hydrologic modeling; maintaining and updating spatial data for watershed boundaries, streams, and water bodies and integrating high‑resolution digital elevation data; and assessing effectiveness of forestry best management practices for water quality.

 

(h) $25,000 the first year and $25,000 the second year are for maintaining and updating buffer maps and for technical guidance on interpreting buffer maps for local units of government implementing buffer requirements.  Maps must be provided to local units of government and made available to landowners on the Department of Natural Resources website.

 

(i) $350,000 the first year is to develop and designate a groundwater management area under Minnesota Statutes, section 103G.287, subdivision 4, in Dakota County.

 

Sec. 6.  BOARD OF WATER AND SOIL RESOURCES

$65,078,000

 

$69,178,000

 

(a) $21,782,000 the first year and $21,782,000 the second year are for performance-based grants with multiyear implementation plans to local government units.  The grants may be used to implement projects that protect, enhance, and restore surface water quality in lakes, rivers, and streams; protect groundwater from degradation; and protect drinking water sources.  Projects must be identified in a comprehensive watershed plan developed under the One Watershed, One Plan and seven-county metropolitan groundwater or surface water management frameworks as provided for in Minnesota Statutes, chapters 103B, 103C, 103D, and 114D.  Grant recipients must identify a nonstate match and may use other legacy funds to supplement projects funded under this paragraph.  This appropriation may be used for:

 

(1) implementation grants to watershed planning areas with approved plans, including but not limited to Buffalo-Red River, Cannon River, Cedar River, Clearwater River, Des Moines River, Hawk Creek, Lac qui Parle Yellow Bank, Lake of the Woods, Lake Superior North, Le Seuer River, Leech Lake River, Long


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Prairie River, Lower Minnesota River North, Lower Minnesota River West, Lower Minnesota River South, Lower St. Croix River, Marsh and Wild Rice, Middle Snake Tamarack Rivers, Mississippi East, Mississippi River Headwaters, Mississippi West, Missouri River Basin, Mustinka/Bois de Sioux, Nemadji River, North Fork Crow River, Otter Tail, Pine River, Pomme de Terre River, Red Lake River, Redeye River, Root River, Rum River, Sauk River, Shell Rock River/Winnebago Watershed, Snake River, South Fork Crow River, St. Louis River, Thief River, Two Rivers Plus, Vermillion, Watonwan River, Winona La Crescent, Yellow Medicine River, and Zumbro River;

 

(2) seven-county metropolitan groundwater or surface water management frameworks; and

 

(3) other comprehensive watershed management plan planning areas that have a board-approved and local-government-adopted plan as authorized in Minnesota Statutes, section 103B.801.

 

The board may determine whether a planning area is not ready to proceed, does not have the nonstate match committed, or has not expended all money granted to it.  Upon making the determination, the board may allocate a grant's proposed or unexpended allocation to another planning area to implement priority projects, programs, or practices.

 

(b) $11,133,000 the first year and $11,133,000 the second year are for grants to local government units to protect and restore surface water and drinking water; to keep water on the land; to protect, enhance, and restore water quality in lakes, rivers, and streams; and to protect groundwater and drinking water, including feedlot water quality and subsurface sewage treatment system projects and stream bank, stream channel, shoreline restoration, and ravine stabilization projects.  The projects must use practices demonstrated to be effective, be of long-lasting public benefit, include a match, and be consistent with total maximum daily load (TMDL) implementation plans, watershed restoration and protection strategies (WRAPS), or local water management plans or their equivalents.  Up to 20 percent of this appropriation is available for land-treatment projects and practices that benefit drinking water.

 

(c) $4,841,000 the first year and $4,841,000 the second year are for accelerated implementation, local resource protection, enhancement grants, statewide analytical targeting or technology tools that fill an identified gap, program enhancements for technical assistance, citizen and community outreach, compliance, and training and certification.

 

(d) $1,355,000 the first year and $1,355,000 the second year are:


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(1) to provide state oversight and accountability, evaluate and communicate results, provide implementation tools, and measure the value of conservation program implementation by local governments; and

 

(2) to prepare, in consultation with the commissioners of natural resources, health, agriculture, and the Pollution Control Agency, and submit to the legislature by March 1 each even-numbered year a biennial report detailing the recipients and projects funded under this section and the amount of pollution reduced.

 

(e) $1,936,000 the first year and $1,936,000 the second year are to provide assistance, oversight, and grants for supporting local governments in implementing and complying with riparian protection and excessive soil loss requirements.

 

(f) $1,936,000 the first year and $1,936,000 the second year are to develop a pilot working lands floodplain program and to purchase, restore, or preserve riparian land and floodplains adjacent to lakes, rivers, streams, and tributaries, by conservation easements or contracts to keep water on the land, to decrease sediment, pollutant, and nutrient transport; reduce hydrologic impacts to surface waters; and increase infiltration for groundwater recharge.  Up to $180,000 is for deposit in a monitoring and enforcement account.

 

(g) $1,000,000 the first year and $1,000,000 the second year are for permanent conservation easements on wellhead protection areas under Minnesota Statutes, section 103F.515, subdivision 2, paragraph (d), or for grants to local units of government for fee title acquisition to permanently protect groundwater supply sources on wellhead protection areas or for otherwise ensuring long-term protection of groundwater supply sources as described under alternative management tools in the Department of Agriculture Minnesota Nitrogen Fertilizer Management Plan, including using low-nitrogen cropping systems or implementing nitrogen fertilizer best management practices.  Priority must be placed on land that is located where the vulnerability of the drinking water supply is designated as high or very high by the commissioner of health, where drinking water protection plans have identified specific activities that will achieve long-term protection, and on lands with expiring conservation reserve program contracts.  Up to $100,000 is for deposit in a monitoring and enforcement account.

 

(h) $42,000 the first year and $42,000 the second year are for a technical evaluation panel to conduct ten restoration evaluations under Minnesota Statutes, section 114D.50, subdivision 6.

 

(i) $2,904,000 the first year and $2,904,000 the second year are for assistance, oversight, and grants to local governments to transition local water management plans to a watershed approach as provided for in Minnesota Statutes, section 103B.801.


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(j) $2,000,000 the second year is to purchase and restore permanent conservation sites via easements or contracts to treat and store water on the land for water quality improvement purposes and related technical assistance.  This work may be done in cooperation with the United States Department of Agriculture with a first-priority use to accomplish a conservation reserve enhancement program, or equivalent, in the state.  Up to $100,000 is for deposit in a monitoring and enforcement account.

 

(k) $1,234,000 the first year and $1,234,000 the second year are to purchase permanent conservation easements to protect lands adjacent to public waters that have good water quality but that are threatened with degradation.  Up to $300,000 is for deposit in a monitoring and enforcement account.

 

(l) $362,000 the first year and $362,000 the second year are for grants or contracts for a program to systematically collect data and produce county, watershed, and statewide estimates of soil erosion caused by water and wind, along with tracking adoption of conservation measures, including cover crops, to address erosion.  This appropriation may be used for grants to or contracts with the University of Minnesota to complete this work.

 

(m) $100,000 the first year and $100,00 the second year are for developing and implementing a water legacy grant program to expand partnerships for clean water.

 

(n) $2,420,000 the first year and $2,420,000 the second year are for permanent conservation easements to protect and restore wetlands and associated uplands.  Up to $200,000 is for deposit in a monitoring and enforcement account.

 

(o) $2,033,000 the first year and $2,033,000 the second year are for grants to landowners to enhance adoption of cover crops and other soil health practices in areas where there are direct benefits to public water supplies.  Up to $400,000 is for an agreement with the University of Minnesota Minnesota Office for Soil Health for applied research and education on Minnesota's agroecosystems and soil health management systems.

 

(p) $12,000,000 the first year is for grants to soil and water conservation districts for the purposes of Minnesota Statutes, sections 103C.321 and 103C.331.  The board must award grants based on the number of wells and water bodies contaminated with nitrates and pesticides, acreage contained within a drinking water supply management area, county allocations to soil and water conservation districts, and the amount of private land and public waters.  The board and other agencies may reduce the amount of grants to a county by an amount equal to any reduction in the county's allocation to a soil and water conservation district from the county's previous year allocation when the board determines that the reduction was disproportionate.  The board may use up to one percent for the administration of payments.


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(q) $4,700,000 the second year is for technical assistance and implementation grants to soil and water conservation districts with karst geography and shallow sand aquifers for soil health practices that protect groundwater.

 

(r) $4,700,000 the second year is for technical assistance and implementation grants to soil and water conservation districts for soil health practices to prevent wind and water erosion to protect surface waters.

 

(s) $4,700,000 the second year is for technical assistance and implementation grants to soil and water conservation districts for sustainable forestry and soil health practices to protect surface water and groundwater.

 

(t) The board must contract for delivery of services with Conservation Corps Minnesota for restoration, maintenance, and other activities under this section for up to $750,000 the first year and up to $750,000 the second year.

 

(u) The board may shift grant, cost-share, or easement funds in this section and may adjust the technical and administrative assistance portion of the funds to leverage federal or other nonstate funds or to address oversight responsibilities or high-priority needs identified in local water management plans.

 

(v) The board must require grantees to specify the outcomes that will be achieved by the grants before making any grant awards.

 

(w) The appropriations in this section are available until June 30, 2026, except grant funds are available for five years after the date a grant is executed.  Returned grant funds must be regranted consistent with the purposes of this section.

 

Sec. 7.  DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

$ 6,705,000

$ 6,705,000

 

(a) $1,200,000 the first year and $1,200,000 the second year are for addressing public health concerns related to contaminants found or anticipated to be found in Minnesota drinking water for which no health-based drinking water standards exist and for the department's laboratory to analyze for these contaminants.

 

(b) $3,079,000 the first year and $3,079,000 the second year are for protecting sources of drinking water, including planning, implementation, and surveillance activities and grants to local governments and public water systems.

 

(c) $563,000 the first year and $563,000 the second year are to develop and deliver groundwater restoration and protection strategies on a watershed scale for use in local comprehensive water planning efforts, to provide resources to local governments


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for activities that protect sources of drinking water, and to enhance approaches that improve the capacity of local governmental units to protect and restore groundwater resources.

 

(d) $863,000 the first year and $863,000 the second year are for studying the occurrence and magnitude of contaminants in private wells, including microplastics and nanoplastics, and developing guidance, outreach, and interventions to reduce risks to private‑well users.

 

(e) $250,000 the first year and $250,000 the second year are to develop public health policies and an action plan to address threats to safe drinking water, including development of a statewide plan for protecting drinking water based on recommendations from the Future of Drinking Water report.

 

(f) $750,000 the first year and $750,000 the second year are to adopt and amend health risk limits as required under this act.

 

(g) Unless otherwise specified, the appropriations in this section are available until June 30, 2025.

 

Sec. 8.  METROPOLITAN COUNCIL

 

$3,669,000

 

$3,669,000

 

(a) $919,000 the first year and $919,000 the second year are to implement projects that address emerging threats to the drinking water supply, provide cost-effective regional solutions, leverage interjurisdictional coordination, support local implementation of water supply reliability projects, and prevent degradation of groundwater resources in the metropolitan area.  These projects must provide communities with:

 

(1) potential solutions to leverage regional water use by using surface water, stormwater, wastewater, and groundwater;

 

(2) an analysis of infrastructure requirements for different alternatives;

 

(3) development of planning-level cost estimates, including capital costs and operating costs;

 

(4) identification of funding mechanisms and an equitable cost‑sharing structure for regionally beneficial water supply development projects; and

 

(5) development of subregional groundwater models.

 

(b) $250,000 the first year and $250,000 the second year are for the water demand reduction grant program to encourage municipalities in the metropolitan area to implement measures to reduce water demand to ensure the reliability and protection of drinking water supplies.


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(c) $2,500,000 the first year is for grants or loans for local inflow and infiltration reduction programs addressing high-priority areas in the metropolitan area, as defined in Minnesota Statutes, section 473.121, subdivision 2.

 

(d) $2,500,000 the second year is for grants to replace the privately owned portion of drinking water lead service lines in environmental justice areas determined by the commissioner of the Pollution Control Agency.

 

Sec. 9.  UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA

 

$2,598,000

 

$1,220,000

 

(a) $450,000 the first year and $450,000 the second year are for developing Part A of county geologic atlases.  This appropriation is available until June 30, 2028.

 

(b) $675,000 the first year and $675,000 the second year are for a program to evaluate performance and technology transfer for stormwater best management practices, to evaluate best management performance and effectiveness to support meeting total maximum daily loads, to develop standards and incorporate state-of-the-art guidance using minimal impact design standards as the model, and to implement a system to transfer knowledge and technology across local government, industry, and regulatory sectors.  This appropriation is available until June 30, 2028.

 

(c) $95,000 the first year and $95,000 the second year are for a report that quantifies the multiple benefits of clean water investments, for a review of equity considerations in clean water fund spending, and for proposing climate considerations in comprehensive watershed management plans.

 

(d) $1,378,000 the first year is to study water's role in transporting chronic wasting disease prions, including:

 

(1) identifying mechanisms for the accumulation, persistence, and spread of chronic wasting disease prions through waterways;

 

(2) characterizing chronic wasting disease prion abundance in waterways immediately downstream of regions known to be positive for chronic wasting disease;

 

(3) modeling and forecasting chronic wasting disease contamination and spread based on landscape ecology and hydrology; and

 

(4) developing and evaluating remediation strategies for prion‑contaminated waterways.

 

The Board of Regents must submit a report with the results of the study to the chairs and ranking minority members of the house of representatives and senate committees and divisions with jurisdiction over environment and natural resources and the clean water fund no later than January 15, 2023.


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Sec. 10.  LEGISLATURE

 

$8,000

 

$-0-

 

$8,000 the first year is for the Legislative Coordinating Commission for the website required under Minnesota Statutes, section 3.303, subdivision 10.

 

Sec. 11.  PUBLIC FACILITIES AUTHORITY

 

$8,068,000

 

$8,068,000

 

(a) $7,968,000 the first year and $7,968,000 the second year are for the point source implementation grants program under Minnesota Statutes, section 446A.073.  This appropriation is available until June 30, 2026.

 

(b) $100,000 the first year and $100,000 the second year are for small community wastewater treatment grants and loans under Minnesota Statutes, section 446A.075.  This appropriation is available until June 30, 2026.

 

(c) If there is any uncommitted money at the end of each fiscal year under paragraph (a) or (b), the Public Facilities Authority may transfer the remaining funds to eligible projects under any of the programs listed in this section according to a project's priority rank on the Pollution Control Agency's project priority list.

 

Sec. 12.  [103C.237] SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION DISTRICT FEE.

 

Subdivision 1.  Fee.  A county that contains at least one soil and water conservation district may impose an additional fee of $25 per transaction on the recording or registration of a mortgage subject to the tax under section 287.05, and an additional fee of $25 on the recording or registration of a deed subject to the tax under section 287.21.

 

Subd. 2.  Fee deposited; account.  The fee described in subdivision 1 must be deposited in a special soil and water conservation district account in the county general revenue fund.

 

Subd. 3.  Distribution to soil and water conservation districts.  The county treasurer must transfer money from the county soil and water conservation district account to existing soil and water conservation districts within the county in May, October, and December of each year.  In the event that a county contains more than one soil and water conservation district, money must be allocated equally among each district.

 

Sec. 13.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 114D.50, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

 

Subd. 8.  County eligibility.  To be eligible for a grant funded with money from the clean water fund, a county must:

 

(1) impose a soil and water conservation fee under section 103C.237; or

 

(2) have at least 75 percent of the county covered by a watershed district established under chapter 103D, a watershed management organization as defined under section 103B.205, subdivision 13, or another joint powers entity organized for the purposes of water management with levy authority.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective July 1, 2022, and applies to grants awarded on or after that date.


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Sec. 14.  HEALTH RISK LIMITS; PERFLUOROOCTANE SULFONATE AND NEONICOTINOIDS.

 

(a) By July 1, 2023, the commissioner of health must amend the health risk limit for perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) in Minnesota Rules, part 4717.7860, subpart 15, so that the health risk limit does not exceed 0.015 parts per billion.

 

(b) By January 15, 2024, the commissioner must adopt health risk limits for clothianidin and imidacloprid.

 

(c) In amending and adopting the health risk limits required under this section, the commissioner must comply with Minnesota Statutes, section 144.0751, requiring a reasonable margin of safety to adequately protect the health of infants, children, and adults.

 

Sec. 15.  CLEAN WATER COUNCIL; REPORT REQUIRED.

 

(a) By January 15, 2022, the Clean Water Council must submit a report or reports to the chairs and ranking minority members of the house of representatives and senate committees and divisions with jurisdiction over the environment and natural resources and legacy that includes:

 

(1) an assessment of the implementation of the high-resolution digital elevation data developed with the appropriations in Laws 2009, chapter 172, article 2, section 5, paragraph (d), and Laws 2011, First Special Session, chapter 6, article 2, section 6, paragraph (h);

 

(2) an assessment of the potential impacts of the February 10, 2021, decision of the Minnesota Supreme Court in the consolidated litigation styled as In the Matter of Reissuance of an NPDES/SDS Permit to United States Steel Corporation, parent case number A18-2094; and

 

(3) an evaluation of state agency personnel funded with money from the clean water fund, including demographic characteristics, the number of classified and unclassified positions, and other equity considerations.

 

Sec. 16.  CLEAN WATER COUNCIL; REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL.

 

The Clean Water Council must develop and issue a request for proposal for a study of the impacts of 6PPD‑quinone, a toxic chemical compound derived from a common rubber tire additive, on the state's waters and fish populations.  The research must assess the prevalence of 6PPD-quinone in stormwater and surface water and impacts to the state's fish populations with priority given to areas around Lake Superior and it's salmon populations."

 

Delete the title and insert:

 

"A bill for an act relating to clean water; appropriating money from clean water fund; providing for soil and water conservation district fee and county eligibility for certain funding; requiring rulemaking; requiring studies and reports; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 114D.50, by adding a subdivision; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 103C."

 

 

With the recommendation that when so amended the bill be re-referred to the Committee on Legacy Finance.

 

      The report was adopted.


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Ecklund from the Committee on Labor, Industry, Veterans and Military Affairs Finance and Policy to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 641, A bill for an act relating to military veterans; providing a military veterans jobs tax credit; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 290.

 

Reported the same back with the recommendation that the bill be re-referred to the Committee on Taxes.

 

      The report was adopted.

 

 

Stephenson from the Committee on Commerce Finance and Policy to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 648, A bill for an act relating to health insurance; prohibiting health plans from limiting testing for opioids; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 62Q.

 

Reported the same back with the following amendments:

 

Delete everything after the enacting clause and insert:

 

"Section 1.  [62Q.472] SCREENING AND TESTING FOR OPIOIDS.

 

(a) A health plan company shall not place a lifetime or annual limit on screenings and urinalysis testing for opioids for an enrollee in an inpatient or outpatient substance use disorder treatment program when ordered by a health care provider and performed by an accredited clinical laboratory.  A health plan company is not prohibited from conducting a medical necessity review when screenings or urinalysis testing for an enrollee exceeds 24 tests in any 12-month period.

 

(b) This section does not apply to managed care plans or county-based purchasing plans when the plan is providing coverage to public health care program enrollees under chapter 256B or 256L.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective January 1, 2022, and applies to health plans offered, issued, or renewed on or after that date.

 

Sec. 2.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 256B.0625, subdivision 10, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 10.  Laboratory and x-ray services.  (a) Medical assistance covers laboratory and x-ray services.

 

(b) Medical assistance covers screening and urinalysis tests for opioids without lifetime or annual limits.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective January 1, 2022."

 

Correct the title numbers accordingly

 

 

With the recommendation that when so amended the bill be re-referred to the Committee on Health Finance and Policy.

 

      The report was adopted.


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Becker-Finn from the Committee on Judiciary Finance and Civil Law to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 660, A bill for an act relating to health; establishing the Dignity in Pregnancy and Childbirth Act; requiring continuing education on anti-racism training and implicit bias; expanding the maternal death studies conducted by the commissioner of health to include maternal morbidity; appropriating money; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 145.901; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 144.

 

Reported the same back with the recommendation that the bill be re-referred to the Committee on Health Finance and Policy.

 

      The report was adopted.

 

 

Sundin from the Committee on Agriculture Finance and Policy to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 661, A bill for an act relating to agriculture; appropriating money for the Forever Green Agriculture Initiative at the University of Minnesota.

 

Reported the same back with the recommendation that the bill be re-referred to the Committee on Environment and Natural Resources Finance and Policy.

 

      The report was adopted.

 

 

Becker-Finn from the Committee on Judiciary Finance and Civil Law to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 801, A bill for an act relating to health; establishing a prescription drug affordability board and prescription drug affordability advisory council; providing for prescription drug cost reviews and remedies; requiring a report; appropriating money; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 62J.

 

Reported the same back with the recommendation that the bill be re-referred to the Committee on State Government Finance and Elections.

 

      The report was adopted.

 

 

Stephenson from the Committee on Commerce Finance and Policy to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 1002, A bill for an act relating to health insurance; requiring guaranteed issue for individual health plans offered by health carriers to Minnesota residents; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 62A.65, subdivision 1.

 

Reported the same back with the following amendments:

 

Delete everything after the enacting clause and insert:

 

"Section 1.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 62A.04, subdivision 2, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 2.  Required provisions.  Except as provided in subdivision 4 each such policy delivered or issued for delivery to any person in this state shall contain the provisions specified in this subdivision in the words in which the same appear in this section.  The insurer may, at its option, substitute for one or more of such provisions corresponding provisions of different wording approved by the commissioner which are in each instance not less favorable in any respect to the insured or the beneficiary.  Such provisions shall be preceded individually by the caption appearing in this subdivision or, at the option of the insurer, by such appropriate individual or group captions or subcaptions as the commissioner may approve.


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(1) A provision as follows:

 

ENTIRE CONTRACT; CHANGES:  This policy, including the endorsements and the attached papers, if any, constitutes the entire contract of insurance.  No change in this policy shall be valid until approved by an executive officer of the insurer and unless such approval be endorsed hereon or attached hereto.  No agent has authority to change this policy or to waive any of its provisions.

 

(2) A provision as follows:

 

TIME LIMIT ON CERTAIN DEFENSES:  (a) After two years from the date of issue of this policy no misstatements, except fraudulent misstatements, made by the applicant in the application for such policy shall be used to void the policy or to deny a claim for loss incurred or disability (as defined in the policy) commencing after the expiration of such two year period.

 

The foregoing policy provision shall not be so construed as to affect any legal requirement for avoidance of a policy or denial of a claim during such initial two year period, nor to limit the application of clauses (1), (2), (3), (4) and (5), in the event of misstatement with respect to age or occupation or other insurance.  A policy which the insured has the right to continue in force subject to its terms by the timely payment of premium (1) until at least age 50 or, (2) in the case of a policy issued after age 44, for at least five years from its date of issue, may contain in lieu of the foregoing the following provisions (from which the clause in parentheses may be omitted at the insurer's option) under the caption "INCONTESTABLE":

 

After this policy has been in force for a period of two years during the lifetime of the insured (excluding any period during which the insured is disabled), it shall become incontestable as to the statements contained in the application.

 

(b) No claim for loss incurred or disability (as defined in the policy) commencing after two years from the date of issue of this policy shall be reduced or denied on the ground that a disease or physical condition not excluded from coverage by name or specific description effective on the date of loss had existed prior to the effective date of coverage of this policy.

 

(3)(a) Except as required for qualified health plans sold through MNsure to individuals receiving advance payments of the premium tax credit, a provision as follows:

 

GRACE PERIOD:  A grace period of ..... (insert a number not less than "7" for weekly premium policies, "10" for monthly premium policies and "31" for all other policies) days will be granted for the payment of each premium falling due after the first premium, during which grace period the policy shall continue in force.

 

A policy which contains a cancellation provision may add, at the end of the above provision,

 

subject to the right of the insurer to cancel in accordance with the cancellation provision hereof.

 

A policy in which the insurer reserves the right to refuse any renewal shall have, at the beginning of the above provision,

 

Unless not less than five days prior to the premium due date the insurer has delivered to the insured or has mailed to the insured's last address as shown by the records of the insurer written notice of its intention not to renew this policy beyond the period for which the premium has been accepted.

 

(b) For qualified individual and small group health plans sold through MNsure to individuals receiving advance payments of the premium tax credit, a grace period provision must be included that complies with the Affordable Care Act and is no less restrictive than the grace period required by the Affordable Care Act section 62A.65, subdivision 2a.


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(4) A provision as follows:

 

REINSTATEMENT:  If any renewal premium be not paid within the time granted the insured for payment, a subsequent acceptance of premium by the insurer or by any agent duly authorized by the insurer to accept such premium, without requiring in connection therewith an application for reinstatement, shall reinstate the policy.  If the insurer or such agent requires an application for reinstatement and issues a conditional receipt for the premium tendered, the policy will be reinstated upon approval of such application by the insurer or, lacking such approval, upon the forty-fifth day following the date of such conditional receipt unless the insurer has previously notified the insured in writing of its disapproval of such application.  For health plans described in section 62A.011, subdivision 3, clause (10), an insurer must accept payment of a renewal premium and reinstate the policy, if the insured applies for reinstatement no later than 60 days after the due date for the premium payment, unless:

 

(1) the insured has in the interim left the state or the insurer's service area; or

 

(2) the insured has applied for reinstatement on two or more prior occasions.

 

The reinstated policy shall cover only loss resulting from such accidental injury as may be sustained after the date of reinstatement and loss due to such sickness as may begin more than ten days after such date.  In all other respects the insured and insurer shall have the same rights thereunder as they had under the policy immediately before the due date of the defaulted premium, subject to any provisions endorsed hereon or attached hereto in connection with the reinstatement.  Any premium accepted in connection with a reinstatement shall be applied to a period for which premium has not been previously paid, but not to any period more than 60 days prior to the date of reinstatement.  The last sentence of the above provision may be omitted from any policy which the insured has the right to continue in force subject to its terms by the timely payment of premiums (1) until at least age 50, or, (2) in the case of a policy issued after age 44, for at least five years from its date of issue.

 

(5) A provision as follows:

 

NOTICE OF CLAIM:  Written notice of claim must be given to the insurer within 20 days after the occurrence or commencement of any loss covered by the policy, or as soon thereafter as is reasonably possible.  Notice given by or on behalf of the insured or the beneficiary to the insurer at ..... (insert the location of such office as the insurer may designate for the purpose), or to any authorized agent of the insurer, with information sufficient to identify the insured, shall be deemed notice to the insurer.

 

In a policy providing a loss-of-time benefit which may be payable for at least two years, an insurer may at its option insert the following between the first and second sentences of the above provision:

 

Subject to the qualifications set forth below, if the insured suffers loss of time on account of disability for which indemnity may be payable for at least two years, the insured shall, at least once in every six months after having given notice of claim, give to the insurer notice of continuance of said disability, except in the event of legal incapacity.  The period of six months following any filing of proof by the insured or any payment by the insurer on account of such claim or any denial of liability in whole or in part by the insurer shall be excluded in applying this provision.  Delay in the giving of such notice shall not impair the insured's right to any indemnity which would otherwise have accrued during the period of six months preceding the date on which such notice is actually given.

 

(6) A provision as follows:

 

CLAIM FORMS:  The insurer, upon receipt of a notice of claim, will furnish to the claimant such forms as are usually furnished by it for filing proofs of loss.  If such forms are not furnished within 15 days after the giving of such notice the claimant shall be deemed to have complied with the requirements of this policy as to proof of loss upon submitting, within the time fixed in the policy for filing proofs of loss, written proof covering the occurrence, the character and the extent of the loss for which claim is made.


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(7) A provision as follows:

 

PROOFS OF LOSS:  Written proof of loss must be furnished to the insurer at its said office in case of claim for loss for which this policy provides any periodic payment contingent upon continuing loss within 90 days after the termination of the period for which the insurer is liable and in case of claim for any other loss within 90 days after the date of such loss.  Failure to furnish such proof within the time required shall not invalidate nor reduce any claim if it was not reasonably possible to give proof within such time, provided such proof is furnished as soon as reasonably possible and in no event, except in the absence of legal capacity, later than one year from the time proof is otherwise required.

 

(8) A provision as follows:

 

TIME OF PAYMENT OF CLAIMS:  Indemnities payable under this policy for any loss other than loss for which this policy provides periodic payment will be paid immediately upon receipt of due written proof of such loss.  Subject to due written proof of loss, all accrued indemnities for loss for which this policy provides periodic payment will be paid ..... (insert period for payment which must not be less frequently than monthly) and any balance remaining unpaid upon the termination of liability will be paid immediately upon receipt of due written proof.

 

(9) A provision as follows:

 

PAYMENT OF CLAIMS:  Indemnity for loss of life will be payable in accordance with the beneficiary designation and the provisions respecting such payment which may be prescribed herein and effective at the time of payment.  If no such designation or provision is then effective, such indemnity shall be payable to the estate of the insured.  Any other accrued indemnities unpaid at the insured's death may, at the option of the insurer, be paid either to such beneficiary or to such estate.  All other indemnities will be payable to the insured.

 

The following provisions, or either of them, may be included with the foregoing provision at the option of the insurer:

 

If any indemnity of this policy shall be payable to the estate of the insured, or to an insured or beneficiary who is a minor or otherwise not competent to give a valid release, the insurer may pay such indemnity, up to an amount not exceeding $..... (insert an amount which shall not exceed $1,000), to any relative by blood or connection by marriage of the insured or beneficiary who is deemed by the insurer to be equitably entitled thereto.  Any payment made by the insurer in good faith pursuant to this provision shall fully discharge the insurer to the extent of such payment.

 

Subject to any written direction of the insured in the application or otherwise all or a portion of any indemnities provided by this policy on account of hospital, nursing, medical, or surgical services may, at the insurer's option and unless the insured requests otherwise in writing not later than the time of filing proofs of such loss, be paid directly to the hospital or person rendering such services; but it is not required that the service be rendered by a particular hospital or person.

 

(10) A provision as follows:

 

PHYSICAL EXAMINATIONS AND AUTOPSY:  The insurer at its own expense shall have the right and opportunity to examine the person of the insured when and as often as it may reasonably require during the pendency of a claim hereunder and to make an autopsy in case of death where it is not forbidden by law.

 

(11) A provision as follows:

 

LEGAL ACTIONS:  No action at law or in equity shall be brought to recover on this policy prior to the expiration of 60 days after written proof of loss has been furnished in accordance with the requirements of this policy.  No such action shall be brought after the expiration of three years after the time written proof of loss is required to be furnished.


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(12) A provision as follows:

 

CHANGE OF BENEFICIARY:  Unless the insured makes an irrevocable designation of beneficiary, the right to change of beneficiary is reserved to the insured and the consent of the beneficiary or beneficiaries shall not be requisite to surrender or assignment of this policy or to any change of beneficiary or beneficiaries, or to any other changes in this policy.  The first clause of this provision, relating to the irrevocable designation of beneficiary, may be omitted at the insurer's option.

 

Sec. 2.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 62A.10, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

 

Subd. 5.  Prohibition on waiting periods that exceed 90 days.  (a) For purposes of this subdivision, "waiting period" means the period that must pass before coverage becomes effective for an individual who is otherwise eligible to enroll under the terms of a group health plan.

 

(b) A health carrier offering a group health plan must not apply a waiting period that exceeds 90 days, with exceptions for the circumstances described in paragraphs (c) to (e).  A health carrier does not violate this subdivision solely because an individual is permitted to take additional time to elect coverage beyond the end of the 90-day waiting period.

 

(c) If a group health plan conditions eligibility on an employee working full time or regularly having a specified number of service hours per period, and the plan is unable to determine whether a newly hired employee is full time or reasonably expected to regularly work the specific number of hours per period, the plan may take a reasonable period of time, not to exceed 12 months beginning on any date between the employee's start date and the first day of the first calendar month after the employee's start date, to determine whether the employee meets the plan's eligibility condition.

 

(d) If a group health plan conditions eligibility on an employee having completed a cumulative number of service hours, the cumulative hours-of-service requirement must not exceed 1,200 hours.

 

(e) An orientation period may be added to the 90-day waiting period if the orientation period is one month or less.  The one-month period is determined by adding one calendar month and subtracting one calendar day, measured from an employee's start date in a position that is otherwise eligible for coverage.

 

(f) A group health plan may treat an employee whose employment has terminated and is later rehired as newly eligible upon rehire and require the rehired employee to meet the plan's eligibility criteria and waiting period again, if doing so is reasonable under the circumstances.  Treating an employee as rehired is reasonable if the employee has a break in service of at least 13 weeks, or at least 26 weeks if the employer is an educational institution.

 

Sec. 3.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 62A.65, subdivision 1, is amended to read:

 

Subdivision 1.  Applicability.  No health carrier, as defined in section 62A.011, shall offer, sell, issue, or renew any individual health plan, as defined in section 62A.011, to a Minnesota resident except in compliance with this section.  This section does not apply to the Comprehensive Health Association established in section 62E.10.  A health carrier must only offer, sell, issue, or renew individual health plans on a guaranteed issue basis and at a premium rate that does not vary based on the health status of the individual.

 

Sec. 4.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 62A.65, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

 

Subd. 2a.  Grace period for nonpayment of premium.  (a) Notwithstanding any other law to the contrary, an individual health plan may be canceled for nonpayment of premiums, but must include a grace period as described in this subdivision.


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(b) The grace period must be three consecutive months.  During the grace period, the health carrier must:

 

(1) pay all claims for services that would have been covered if the premium had been paid, which are provided to the enrollee during the first month of the grace period, and may pend claims for services provided to an enrollee in the second and third months of the grace period; and

 

(2) notify health care providers of the possibility of denied claims when an enrollee is in the second and third month of the grace period.

 

(c) In order to stop a cancellation, an enrollee must pay all outstanding premiums before the end of the grace period.

 

(d) If a health plan is canceled under this subdivision, the final day of the enrollment is the last day of the first month of the three-month grace period.

 

Sec. 5.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 62D.095, subdivision 2, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 2.  Co-payments.  A health maintenance contract may impose a co-payment and coinsurance consistent with the provisions of the Affordable Care Act as defined under section 62A.011, subdivision 1a state and federal law.

 

Sec. 6.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 62D.095, subdivision 3, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 3.  Deductibles.  A health maintenance contract may impose a deductible consistent with the provisions of the Affordable Care Act as defined under section 62A.011, subdivision 1a state and federal law.

 

Sec. 7.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 62D.095, subdivision 4, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 4.  Annual out-of-pocket maximums.  A health maintenance contract may impose an annual out‑of‑pocket maximum consistent with the provisions of the Affordable Care Act as defined under section 62A.011, subdivision 1a section 62Q.677, subdivision 6a.

 

Sec. 8.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 62D.095, subdivision 5, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 5.  Exceptions.  No co-payments or deductibles may be imposed on preventive health care items and services consistent with the provisions of the Affordable Care Act as defined under section 62A.011, subdivision 1a, as defined in section 62Q.46, subdivision 1.

 

Sec. 9.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 62Q.01, subdivision 2a, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 2a.  Dependent child to the limiting age.  "Dependent child to the limiting age" or "dependent children to the limiting age" means those individuals who are eligible and covered as a dependent child under the terms of a health plan who have not yet attained 26 years of age.  A health plan company must not deny or restrict eligibility for a dependent child to the limiting age based on financial dependency, residency, marital status, or student status.  For coverage under plans offered by the Minnesota Comprehensive Health Association, dependent to the limiting age means dependent as defined in section 62A.302, subdivision 3.  Notwithstanding the provisions in this subdivision, a health plan may include:

 

(1) eligibility requirements regarding the absence of other health plan coverage as permitted by the Affordable Care Act for grandfathered plan coverage; or

 

(2) an age greater than 26 in its policy, contract, or certificate of coverage.


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Sec. 10.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 62Q.46, is amended to read:

 

62Q.46 PREVENTIVE ITEMS AND SERVICES.

 

Subdivision 1.  Coverage for preventive items and services.  (a) "Preventive items and services" has the meaning specified in the Affordable Care Act means the items and services categorized as preventive under subdivision 1a.

 

(b) A health plan company must provide coverage for preventive items and services at a participating provider without imposing cost-sharing requirements, including a deductible, coinsurance, or co-payment.  Nothing in this section prohibits a health plan company that has a network of providers from excluding coverage or imposing cost‑sharing requirements for preventive items or services that are delivered by an out-of-network provider.

 

(c) A health plan company is not required to provide coverage for any items or services specified in any recommendation or guideline described in paragraph (a) if the recommendation or guideline is no longer included as a preventive item or service as defined in paragraph (a).  Annually, a health plan company must determine whether any additional items or services must be covered without cost-sharing requirements or whether any items or services are no longer required to be covered.

 

(d) Nothing in this section prevents a health plan company from using reasonable medical management techniques to determine the frequency, method, treatment, or setting for a preventive item or service to the extent not specified in the recommendation or guideline.

 

(e) This section does not apply to grandfathered plans.

 

(f) This section does not apply to plans offered by the Minnesota Comprehensive Health Association.

 

Subd. 1a.  Preventive items and services.  The commissioner of commerce must provide health plan companies with information regarding which items and services must be categorized as preventive.

 

Subd. 2.  Coverage for office visits in conjunction with preventive items and services.  (a) A health plan company may impose cost-sharing requirements with respect to an office visit if a preventive item or service is billed separately or is tracked separately as individual encounter data from the office visit.

 

(b) A health plan company must not impose cost-sharing requirements with respect to an office visit if a preventive item or service is not billed separately or is not tracked separately as individual encounter data from the office visit and the primary purpose of the office visit is the delivery of the preventive item or service.

 

(c) A health plan company may impose cost-sharing requirements with respect to an office visit if a preventive item or service is not billed separately or is not tracked separately as individual encounter data from the office visit and the primary purpose of the office visit is not the delivery of the preventive item or service.

 

Subd. 3.  Additional services not prohibited.  Nothing in this section prohibits a health plan company from providing coverage for preventive items and services in addition to those specified in the Affordable Care Act subdivision 1a, or from denying coverage for preventive items and services that are not recommended as preventive items and services under the Affordable Care Act subdivision 1a.  A health plan company may impose cost-sharing requirements for a treatment not described in the Affordable Care Act subdivision 1a even if the treatment results from a preventive item or service described in the Affordable Care Act subdivision 1a.


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Sec. 11.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 62Q.677, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

 

Subd. 6a.  Out-of-pocket annual maximum.  By October of each year, the commissioner of commerce must determine the maximum annual out-of-pocket limits applicable to individual health plans and small group health plans.

 

Sec. 12.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 62Q.81, is amended to read:

 

62Q.81 ESSENTIAL HEALTH BENEFIT PACKAGE REQUIREMENTS.

 

Subdivision 1.  Essential health benefits package.  (a) Health plan companies offering individual and small group health plans must include the essential health benefits package required under section 1302(a) of the Affordable Care Act and as described in this subdivision.

 

(b) The essential health benefits package means insurance coverage that:

 

(1) provides the essential health benefits as outlined in the Affordable Care Act described in subdivision 4;

 

(2) limits cost-sharing for such the coverage in accordance with the Affordable Care Act, as described in subdivision 2; and

 

(3) subject to subdivision 3, provides bronze, silver, gold, or platinum level of coverage in accordance with the Affordable Care Act, as described in subdivision 3.

 

Subd. 2.  Cost-sharing; coverage for enrollees under the age of 21.  (a) Cost-sharing includes (1) deductibles, coinsurance, co-payments, or similar charges, and (2) qualified medical expenses, as defined in section 223(d)(2) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended.  Cost-sharing does not include premiums, balance billing from non-network providers, or spending for noncovered services.

 

(b) Cost-sharing per year for individual health plans is limited to the amount allowed under section 223(c)(2)(A)(ii) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, increased by an amount equal to the product of that amount and the premium adjustment percentage.  The premium adjustment percentage is the percentage that the average per capita premium for health insurance coverage in the United States for the preceding calendar year exceeds the average per capita premium for 2017.  If the amount of the increase is not a multiple of $50, the increases must be rounded to the next lowest multiple of $50.

 

(c) Cost-sharing per year for small group health plans is limited to twice the amount allowed under paragraph (b).

 

(d) If a health plan company offers health plans in any level of coverage specified under section 1302(d) of the Affordable Care Act, as described in subdivision 1, paragraph (b), clause (3) 3, the health plan company shall also offer coverage in that level to individuals who have not attained 21 years of age as of the beginning of a policy year.

 

Subd. 3.  Levels of coverage; alternative compliance for catastrophic plans.  (a) A health plan in the bronze level must provide a level of coverage designed to provide benefits that are actuarially equivalent to 60 percent of the full actuarial value of the benefits provided under the plan.

 

(b) A health plan in the silver level must provide a level of coverage designed to provide benefits that are actuarially equivalent to 70 percent of the full actuarial value of the benefits provided under the plan.

 

(c) A health plan in the gold level must provide a level of coverage designed to provide benefits that are actuarially equivalent to 80 percent of the full actuarial value of the benefits provided under the plan.


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(d) A health plan in the platinum level must provide a level of coverage designed to provide benefits that are actuarially equivalent to 90 percent of the full actuarial value of the benefits provided under the plan.

 

(e) A health plan company that does not provide an individual or small group health plan in the bronze, silver, gold, or platinum level of coverage, as described in subdivision 1, paragraph (b), clause (3), shall be treated as meeting meets the requirements of this section 1302(d) of the Affordable Care Act with respect to any policy plan year if the health plan company provides a catastrophic plan that meets the following requirements of section 1302(e) of the Affordable Care Act.:

 

(1) enrollment in the health plan is limited only to individuals that:

 

(i) have not attained age 30 before the beginning of the plan year;

 

(ii) are unable to access affordable coverage; or

 

(iii) are experiencing a hardship in reference to the individual's capability to access coverage; and

 

(2) the health plan provides:

 

(i) essential health benefits, except that the plan does not provide benefits for any plan year until the individual has incurred cost-sharing expenses in an amount equal to the limitation in effect under subdivision 2; and

 

(ii) coverage for at least three primary care visits.

 

Subd. 4.  Essential health benefits; definition.  (a) For purposes of this section, "essential health benefits" has the meaning given under section 1302(b) of the Affordable Care Act and includes means:

 

(1) ambulatory patient services;

 

(2) emergency services;

 

(3) hospitalization;

 

(4) laboratory services;

 

(5) maternity and newborn care;

 

(6) mental health and substance use disorder services, including behavioral health treatment;

 

(7) pediatric services, including oral and vision care;

 

(8) prescription drugs;

 

(9) preventive and wellness services and chronic disease management;

 

(10) rehabilitative and habilitative services and devices; and

 

(11) additional essential health benefits included in the EHB-benchmark plan, as defined under the Affordable Care Act health plan described in paragraph (c).


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(b) If a service provider does not have a contractual relationship with the health plan to provide services, emergency services must be provided without imposing any prior authorization requirement or limitation on coverage that is more restrictive than the requirements or limitations that apply to emergency services received from providers who have a contractual relationship with the health plan.  If services are provided out-of-network, the cost‑sharing must be equivalent to services provided in-network.

 

(c) The scope of essential health benefits under paragraph (a) must be equal to the scope of benefits provided under a typical employer plan.

 

(d) Essential health benefits must:

 

(1) reflect an appropriate balance among the categories to ensure benefits are not unduly weighted toward any category;

 

(2) not make coverage decisions, determine reimbursement rates, establish incentive programs, or design benefits in a manner that discriminates against individuals on the basis of age, disability, or expected length of life;

 

(3) account for the health care needs of diverse segments of the population, including women, children, persons with disabilities, and other groups; and

 

(4) ensure that health benefits established as essential are not subject to denial against the individual's wishes on the basis of the individual's age or expected length of life or of the individual's present or predicted disability, degree of medical dependency, or quality of life.

 

Subd. 5.  Exception.  This section does not apply to a dental plan described in section 1311(d)(2)(B)(ii) of the Affordable Care Act that is limited in scope and provides pediatric dental benefits.

 

Sec. 13.  [363A.115] UNFAIR DISCRIMINATORY PRACTICES RELATED TO HEALTH CARE.

 

(a) It is an unfair discriminatory practice for an individual to be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination on the basis of race, color, creed, religion, disability, national origin, marital status, sexual orientation, or sex by any health program or health insurance provider if any part of the health care program receives federal financial assistance or is administered by a state or federal agency, or by any health insurance provider that provides insurance through a state or federal marketplace.

 

(b) An entity covered under this section is required to:  (1) make all programs and activities provided through electronic and information technology accessible; (2) ensure the physical accessibility of newly constructed or altered facilities; and (3) provide appropriate auxiliary aids and services to individuals with disabilities.  Entities covered under this section must take reasonable steps to provide meaningful access to each individual with limited English proficiency and provide information about language assistance services.

 

Sec. 14.  COMMISSIONER OF COMMERCE; DETERMINATION OF PREVENTIVE ITEMS AND SERVICES.

 

(a) The commissioner of commerce must determine the items and services that are preventive under Minnesota Statutes, section 62Q.46, subdivision 1a.  Items and services that are preventive must include:

 

(1) evidence-based items or services that have in effect a rating of A or B pursuant to the recommendations of the United States Preventive Services Task Force in effect January 1, 2021, and with respect to the individual involved;


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(2) immunizations for routine use in children, adolescents, and adults that have in effect a recommendation from the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention with respect to the individual involved.  For the purposes of this clause, a recommendation from the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is considered in effect after it has been adopted by the Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and a recommendation is considered to be for routine use if it is listed on the Immunization Schedules of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention;

 

(3) with respect to infants, children, and adolescents, evidence-informed preventive care and screenings provided for in comprehensive guidelines supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration; and

 

(4) with respect to women, additional preventive care and screenings not described in clause (1), as provided for in comprehensive guidelines supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration.

 

Sec. 15.  EFFECTIVE DATE.

 

Sections 1 to 13 are effective January 1, 2022, for health plans offered, issued, or renewed on or after that date."

 

Delete the title and insert:

 

"A bill for an act relating to health insurance; codifying certain provisions of the Affordable Care Act; requiring guaranteed issue of individual health plans offered by health plan companies to Minnesota residents; prohibiting certain unfair discriminatory practices; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, sections 62A.04, subdivision 2; 62A.10, by adding a subdivision; 62A.65, subdivision 1, by adding a subdivision; 62D.095, subdivisions 2, 3, 4, 5; 62Q.01, subdivision 2a; 62Q.46; 62Q.677, by adding a subdivision; 62Q.81; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 363A."

 

 

With the recommendation that when so amended the bill be re-referred to the Committee on Health Finance and Policy.

 

      The report was adopted.

 

 

Becker-Finn from the Committee on Judiciary Finance and Civil Law to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 1060, A bill for an act relating to housing; establishing procedures for eviction and tenant screening reports; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, sections 504B.001, subdivision 4; 504B.241, subdivision 4; 504B.245; 504B.321; 504B.331; 504B.335; 504B.345, subdivision 1, by adding a subdivision; 504B.361, subdivision 1; 504B.371, subdivisions 1, 4, 5; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 504B; repealing Minnesota Statutes 2020, sections 504B.341; 504B.371, subdivision 7.

 

Reported the same back with the following amendments:

 

Page 3, line 29, after the semicolon, insert "and"

 

Page 3, line 32, delete "; and" and insert a period

 

Page 4, delete lines 1 and 2

 

Page 7, line 7, delete "that" and insert ".  A party may file an affidavit that sets forth the specific facts constituting the alleged settlement violation.  The party must serve this affidavit on all other parties."


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Page 7, delete lines 8 to 10

 

Page 7, delete lines 11 to 15 and insert:

 

"Subd. 2.  Adjudication.  The court may schedule a hearing on the evidence or make a determination based on any filings and evidence submitted by the parties on the issue."

 

Page 9, delete section 11

 

Page 9, delete section 14 and insert:

 

"Sec. 13.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 504B.371, subdivision 7, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 7.  Exception.  Subdivisions 1, 4, and 6 do not apply in an action on a lease, against a tenant holding over after the expiration of the term of the lease, or a termination of the lease by a notice to quit, action where the plaintiff has prevailed on a claim pursuant to section 504B.171, subdivision 2, if the plaintiff gives a bond conditioned to pay all costs and damages if on the appeal the judgment of restitution is reversed and a new trial ordered.  In such a case, the court shall issue a writ for recovery of premises and order to vacate notwithstanding the notice of appeal, as if no appeal had been taken, and the appellate court shall issue all needful writs and processes to carry out any judgment which may be rendered in the court.

 

Sec. 14.  REPEALER.

 

Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 504B.341, is repealed."

 

Renumber the sections in sequence and correct the internal references

 

Correct the title numbers accordingly

 

 

With the recommendation that when so amended the bill be placed on the General Register.

 

      The report was adopted.

 

 

Hansen, R., from the Committee on Environment and Natural Resources Finance and Policy to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 1165, A bill for an act relating to environment; modifying certain requirements for labeling items as biodegradable or compostable; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 325E.046.

 

Reported the same back with the recommendation that the bill be re-referred to the Committee on Commerce Finance and Policy.

 

      The report was adopted.

 

 

Pinto from the Committee on Early Childhood Finance and Policy to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 1197, A bill for an act relating to health; establishing a home visiting program for pregnant women and families; appropriating money; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 145.

 

Reported the same back with the recommendation that the bill be re-referred to the Committee on Health Finance and Policy.

 

      The report was adopted.


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Schultz from the Committee on Human Services Finance and Policy to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 1287, A bill for an act relating to human services; modifying provisions governing child foster care and background studies; appropriating money; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, sections 245A.05; 245A.07, subdivision 1; 245A.16, by adding a subdivision; 245C.05, subdivisions 2c, 2d, 4; 245C.08, subdivision 3; 245C.14, subdivision 1; 245C.15, by adding a subdivision; 245C.24, subdivisions 2, 3, 4, by adding a subdivision.

 

Reported the same back with the following amendments:

 

Page 4, line 11, before the semicolon, insert ", and documentation that the individual has remedied issues or conditions identified in child protection or court records that are relevant to safely caring for a child"

 

Page 5, line 2, delete the second "or" and insert "and"

 

Page 5, after line 11, insert:

 

"(c) An applicant for a family foster setting license must sign all releases of information requested by the county or private licensing agency."

 

Page 5, line 12, delete "(c)" and insert "(d)"

 

Page 5, line 15, delete "(d)" and insert "(e)"

 

Page 11, line 7, after the semicolon, insert "or"

 

Page 11, line 10, delete the third semicolon and insert a period

 

Page 11, delete lines 11 to 13

 

Page 11, before line 14, insert:

 

"(c) Notwithstanding subdivisions 1 to 4, for a background study affiliated with a licensed family foster setting, an individual is disqualified under section 245C.14 if less than 20 years have passed since the termination of the individual's parental rights under section 260C.301.  An individual is disqualified under section 245C.14 if less than 20 years have passed since the termination of the individual's parental rights in any other state or country, where the conditions for the individual's termination of parental rights are substantially similar to the conditions in section 260C.301."

 

Page 11, line 14, delete "(c)" and insert "(d)"

 

Page 12, line 5, delete "(d)" and insert "(e)"

 

Page 12, line 28, delete "(e)" and insert "(f)" and delete "section" and insert "subdivision" and delete "five-year"

 

Page 13, line 3, delete "(f)" and insert "(g)"

 

Page 13, line 8, delete "(c)" and insert "(d)" and delete "(d)" and insert "(e)"

 

Page 13, line 9, delete "(g)" and insert "(h)"

 

Page 13, line 14, delete "(c)" and insert "(d)" and delete "(d)" and insert "(e)"


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Page 16, after line 26, insert:

 

"Sec. 14.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 260C.215, subdivision 4, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 4.  Duties of commissioner.  The commissioner of human services shall:

 

(1) provide practice guidance to responsible social services agencies and licensed child-placing agencies that reflect federal and state laws and policy direction on placement of children;

 

(2) develop criteria for determining whether a prospective adoptive or foster family has the ability to understand and validate the child's cultural background;

 

(3) provide a standardized training curriculum for adoption and foster care workers and administrators who work with children.  Training must address the following objectives:

 

(i) developing and maintaining sensitivity to all cultures;

 

(ii) assessing values and their cultural implications;

 

(iii) making individualized placement decisions that advance the best interests of a particular child under section 260C.212, subdivision 2; and

 

(iv) issues related to cross-cultural placement;

 

(4) provide a training curriculum for all prospective adoptive and foster families that prepares them to care for the needs of adoptive and foster children taking into consideration the needs of children outlined in section 260C.212, subdivision 2, paragraph (b), and, as necessary, preparation is continued after placement of the child and includes the knowledge and skills related to reasonable and prudent parenting standards for the participation of the child in age or developmentally appropriate activities, according to section 260C.212, subdivision 14;

 

(5) develop and provide to responsible social services agencies and licensed child-placing agencies a home study format to assess the capacities and needs of prospective adoptive and foster families.  The format must address problem-solving skills; parenting skills; evaluate the degree to which the prospective family has the ability to understand and validate the child's cultural background, and other issues needed to provide sufficient information for agencies to make an individualized placement decision consistent with section 260C.212, subdivision 2.  For a study of a prospective foster parent, the format must also address the capacity of the prospective foster parent to provide a safe, healthy, smoke-free home environment.  If a prospective adoptive parent has also been a foster parent, any update necessary to a home study for the purpose of adoption may be completed by the licensing authority responsible for the foster parent's license.  If a prospective adoptive parent with an approved adoptive home study also applies for a foster care license, the license application may be made with the same agency which provided the adoptive home study; and

 

(6) consult with representatives reflecting diverse populations from the councils established under sections 3.922 and 15.0145, and other state, local, and community organizations.; and

 

(7) establish family foster setting licensing guidelines for county agencies and private agencies designated or licensed by the commissioner to perform licensing functions and activities under section 245A.04.  Guidelines that the commissioner establishes under this paragraph shall be considered directives of the commissioner under section 245A.16.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective July 1, 2023.


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Sec. 15.  CHILD FOSTER CARE LICENSING GUIDELINES.

 

By July 1, 2023, the commissioner of human services shall, in consultation with stakeholders with expertise in child protection and children's behavioral health, develop family foster setting licensing guidelines for county agencies and private agencies that perform licensing functions.  Stakeholders include but are not limited to child advocates, representatives from community organizations, representatives of the state ethnic councils, the ombudsperson for families, family foster setting providers, youth who have experienced family foster setting placements, county child protection staff, and representatives of county and private licensing agencies."

 

Renumber the sections in sequence

 

Correct the title numbers accordingly

 

 

With the recommendation that when so amended the bill be re-referred to the Committee on Judiciary Finance and Civil Law.

 

      The report was adopted.

 

 

Becker-Finn from the Committee on Judiciary Finance and Civil Law to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 1318, A bill for an act relating to data practices; authorizing dissemination of certain data on driver's license and Minnesota identification card holders for replacement Social Security card applications; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 171.12, subdivision 7b.

 

Reported the same back with the recommendation that the bill be re-referred to the Committee on Transportation Finance and Policy.

 

      The report was adopted.

 

 

Becker-Finn from the Committee on Judiciary Finance and Civil Law to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 1407, A bill for an act relating to education; allowing educational data sharing with tribal nations about tribally enrolled or descendent students; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 13.32, subdivision 3.

 

Reported the same back with the recommendation that the bill be placed on the General Register.

 

      The report was adopted.

 

 

Richardson from the Committee on Education Policy to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 1408, A bill for an act relating to education; modifying requirements for interpreters; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 122A.31, subdivision 1.

 

Reported the same back with the recommendation that the bill be re-referred to the Committee on Education Finance.

 

      The report was adopted.


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Schultz from the Committee on Human Services Finance and Policy to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 1432, A bill for an act relating to human services; modifying vulnerable adult protection provisions; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, sections 626.557, subdivisions 4, 9, 9b, 9c, 9d, 10b, 12b; 626.5571, subdivisions 1, 2; 626.5572, subdivisions 2, 4, 17.

 

Reported the same back with the recommendation that the bill be re-referred to the Committee on Judiciary Finance and Civil Law.

 

      The report was adopted.

 

 

Schultz from the Committee on Human Services Finance and Policy to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 1435, A bill for an act relating to human services; modifying provisions governing children and families; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, sections 256N.02, subdivisions 16, 17; 256N.22, subdivision 1; 256N.23, subdivisions 2, 6; 256N.24, subdivisions 1, 8, 11, 12, 14; 256N.25, subdivision 1, by adding a subdivision; 259.22, subdivision 4; 259.241; 259.35, subdivision 1; 259.53, subdivision 4; 259.73; 259.75, subdivisions 5, 6, 9; 259.83, subdivision 1a; 259A.75, subdivisions 1, 2, 3, 4; 260C.007, subdivision 22a; 260C.212, subdivisions 1, 2, by adding a subdivision; 260C.219, subdivision 5; 260C.503, subdivision 2; 260C.515, subdivision 3; 260C.605, subdivision 1; 260C.607, subdivision 6; 260C.609; 260C.615; repealing Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 259A.70.

 

Reported the same back with the recommendation that the bill be placed on the General Register.

 

      The report was adopted.

 

 

Schultz from the Committee on Human Services Finance and Policy to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 1436, A bill for an act relating to human services; modifying child support provisions; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 256.741, by adding subdivisions; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 518A.

 

Reported the same back with the recommendation that the bill be re-referred to the Committee on Judiciary Finance and Civil Law.

 

      The report was adopted.

 

 

Becker-Finn from the Committee on Judiciary Finance and Civil Law to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 1493, A bill for an act relating to commerce; requiring licensure of student loan servicers; prohibiting certain practices in student loan servicing; appropriating money; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 13.712, by adding a subdivision; proposing coding for new law as Minnesota Statutes, chapter 58B.

 

Reported the same back with the recommendation that the bill be re-referred to the Committee on Commerce Finance and Policy.

 

      The report was adopted.


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Stephenson from the Committee on Commerce Finance and Policy to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 1516, A bill for an act relating to health; allowing pharmacy and provider choice related to the prescribing and dispensing of biological products; requiring a report; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 151.01, by adding subdivisions; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 62W.

 

Reported the same back with the recommendation that the bill be re-referred to the Committee on Health Finance and Policy.

 

      The report was adopted.

 

 

Schultz from the Committee on Human Services Finance and Policy to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 1559, A bill for an act relating to children; modifying adoption provisions; adding safe place for newborns provisions; modifying child welfare program provisions; modifying Northstar kinship assistance provisions; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, sections 144.216, by adding subdivisions; 144.218, by adding a subdivision; 144.226, subdivision 1; 145.902.

 

Reported the same back with the following amendments:

 

Page 4, line 12, delete "section 145.902" and insert "this section"

 

Page 4, line 18, delete the new language

 

 

With the recommendation that when so amended the bill be re-referred to the Committee on Judiciary Finance and Civil Law.

 

      The report was adopted.

 

 

Hansen, R., from the Committee on Environment and Natural Resources Finance and Policy to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 1563, A bill for an act relating to natural resources; modifying provisions related to certifiable fish diseases; modifying reporting requirement on school trust lands; modifying certain provisions for transporting snowmobiles; modifying definition of all-terrain vehicle; modifying provisions for certain invasive species permits; modifying state park provisions; providing for special-use permits in outdoor recreation system; providing for regulation of possessing, propagating, and selling snakes, lizards, and salamanders; modifying hunting and fishing provisions; modifying review and approval of local regulation in Mississippi River Corridor Critical Area; modifying requirements for exchanging wild rice leases; modifying certain accounts; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, sections 17.4982, subdivisions 6, 8, 9, 12, by adding subdivisions; 17.4985, subdivisions 2, 3, 5; 17.4986, subdivisions 2, 4; 17.4991, subdivision 3; 17.4992, subdivision 2; 84.027, subdivision 18; 84.82, subdivisions 1a, 7a; 84.92, subdivision 8; 84D.11, subdivision 1a; 85.052, subdivisions 1, 2, by adding a subdivision; 85.053, subdivision 2; 85.054, subdivision 1; 85.43; 85.47; 97A.401, subdivision 1, by adding a subdivision; 97A.421, subdivision 1, by adding a subdivision; 97A.505, subdivisions 3b, 8; 97B.031, subdivision 1; 97B.036; 97B.086; 97C.005, subdivision 3; 97C.342, subdivision 2; 97C.515, subdivision 2; 97C.805, subdivision 2; 97C.836; 116G.07, by adding a subdivision; 116G.15, by adding a subdivision; Laws 2016, chapter 154, section 16; repealing Minnesota Statutes 2020, sections 85.0505, subdivision 3; 85.0507; 85.054, subdivision 19.

 

Reported the same back with the following amendments:


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Page 9, after line 6, insert:

 

"Sec. 14.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 17.4993, subdivision 1, is amended to read:

 

Subdivision 1.  Taking from public waters.  (a) Under an aquatic farm license, a licensee may only take minnow sperm, minnow eggs, and live minnows for aquatic farm purposes from public waters that have a water body if:

 

(1) the water body has been tested for viral hemorrhagic septicemia when and the testing indicates the disease is not present; or

 

(2) the water body is located within a viral hemorrhagic septicemia-free zone posted on the Department of Natural Resources website.

 

(b) A licensee may take sucker eggs and sperm only in approved waters with a sucker egg license endorsement as provided by section 17.4994.

 

Sec. 15.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 35.155, subdivision 1, is amended to read:

 

Subdivision 1.  Running at large prohibited.  (a) An owner may not allow farmed Cervidae to run at large.  The owner must make all reasonable efforts to return escaped farmed Cervidae to their enclosures as soon as possible.  The owner must immediately notify the commissioner of natural resources of the escape of farmed Cervidae if the farmed Cervidae are not returned or captured by the owner within 24 hours of their escape.

 

(b) An owner is liable for expenses of another person in capturing, caring for, and returning farmed Cervidae that have left their enclosures if the person capturing the farmed Cervidae contacts the owner as soon as possible.

 

(c) If an owner is unwilling or unable to capture escaped farmed Cervidae, the commissioner of natural resources may destroy the escaped farmed Cervidae.  The commissioner of natural resources must allow the owner to attempt to capture the escaped farmed Cervidae prior to destroying the farmed Cervidae.  Farmed Cervidae that are not captured by 24 hours after escape may be destroyed.

 

(d) A hunter licensed by the commissioner of natural resources under chapter 97A may kill and possess escaped farmed Cervidae in a lawful manner and is not liable to the owner for the loss of the animal.

 

(e) Escaped farmed Cervidae killed by a hunter or destroyed by the commissioner of natural resources must be tested for chronic wasting disease at the owner's expense.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective September 1, 2021.

 

Sec. 16.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 35.155, subdivision 6, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 6.  Identification.  (a) Farmed Cervidae must be identified by means approved by the Board of Animal Health.  The identification must include a distinct number that has not been used during the previous three years and must be visible to the naked eye during daylight under normal conditions at a distance of 50 yards.  The identification for white-tailed deer must also include contact information with a phone number or address that enables the reader to readily identify the owner of escaped deer.  This contact information does not need to be visible from a distance of 50 yards.  White-tailed deer must be identified before October 31 of the year in which the animal is born, at the time of weaning, or before movement from the premises, whichever occurs first.  Elk and other cervids must be identified by December 31 of the year in which the animal is born or before movement from the premises, whichever occurs first.  As coordinated by the board, the commissioner of natural resources may destroy any animal that is not identified as required under this subdivision.


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(b) The Board of Animal Health shall register farmed Cervidae.  The owner must submit the registration request on forms provided by the board.  The forms must include sales receipts or other documentation of the origin of the Cervidae.  The board must provide copies of the registration information to the commissioner of natural resources upon request.  The owner must keep written records of the acquisition and disposition of registered farmed Cervidae.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective September 1, 2021."

 

Page 14, after line 5, insert:

 

"Sec. 29.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 97A.015, subdivision 51, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 51.  Unloaded.  "Unloaded" means, with reference to a firearm, without ammunition in the barrels and magazine, if the magazine is in the firearm.  A muzzle-loading firearm with is unloaded if:

 

(1) for a flintlock ignition is unloaded if, it does not have priming powder in a pan.  A muzzle-loading firearm with;

 

(2) for a percussion ignition is unloaded if, it does not have a percussion cap on a nipple.;

 

(3) for an electronic ignition system, the battery is removed and is disconnected from the firearm; and

 

(4) for an encapsulated powder charge ignition system, the primer and powder charge are removed from the firearm.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective the day following final enactment.

 

Sec. 30.  [97A.138] INSECTICIDES IN WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT AREAS.

 

A person may not use a product containing an insecticide in a wildlife management area if the insecticide is from the neonicotinoid class of insecticides."

 

Page 14, line 14, after "sell" insert "native" and after "A" insert "native"

 

Page 14, line 16, after "pet" insert "unless otherwise prohibited under section 84.0895"

 

Page 18, delete section 36 and insert:

 

"Sec. 41.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 97C.342, subdivision 2, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 2.  Bait restrictions.  (a) Frozen or dead fish on the official list of viral hemorrhagic septicemia susceptible species published by the United States Department of Agriculture, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services VHS-susceptible-species list under section 17.4982, subdivision 21b; cisco (all Coregonus, including lake herring and tullibee); and smelt (all Osmerus, Spirincus, Hypomesus, and Allosmerus) being used as bait in waters of the state must originate from water bodies certified disease-free.  A water body is certified as disease-free if:

 

(1) the water body has been tested for viral hemorrhagic septicemia and the testing indicates the disease is not present; or


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(2) the water body is located within a viral hemorrhagic septicemia-free zone posted on the Department of Natural Resources website.

 

(b) Certification for these individually tested water bodies is valid for one year from the date of test results.  Certification of water bodies within a viral hemorrhagic septicemia-free zone posted on the Department of Natural Resources website is valid for the dates included in the posting.  A viral hemorrhagic septicemia-free certification is also referred to as fish health certification."

 

Page 19, after line 27, insert:

 

"Sec. 45.  Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 103C.315, subdivision 4, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 4.  Compensation.  A supervisor shall receive compensation for services up to $75 $125 per day, and may be reimbursed for expenses, including traveling expenses, necessarily incurred in the discharge of duties.  A supervisor may be reimbursed for the use of the supervisor's own automobile in the performance of official duties at a rate up to the maximum tax-deductible mileage rate permitted under the federal Internal Revenue Code."

 

Renumber the sections in sequence

 

Amend the title as follows:

 

Page 1, line 5, after the semicolon, insert "modifying provisions for farmed Cervidae; prohibiting certain insecticides in wildlife management areas; modifying compensation for soil and water conservation district supervisors;"

 

Page 1, line 7, after "selling" insert "native"

 

Correct the title numbers accordingly

 

 

With the recommendation that when so amended the bill be re-referred to the Committee on Ways and Means.

 

      The report was adopted.

 

 

Nelson, M., from the Committee on State Government Finance and Elections to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 1685, A bill for an act relating to labor; ratifying SEIU healthcare agreement.

 

Reported the same back with the following amendments:

 

Page 1, line 7, delete "......." and insert "March 1, 2021"

 

 

With the recommendation that when so amended the bill be re-referred to the Committee on Human Services Finance and Policy.

 

      The report was adopted.


Journal of the House - 21st Day - Monday, March 8, 2021 - Top of Page 875

Richardson from the Committee on Education Policy to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 1712, A bill for an act relating to education; modifying the world's best workforce performance measures; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 120B.11, subdivisions 1, 1a.

 

Reported the same back with the recommendation that the bill be re-referred to the Committee on Education Finance.

 

      The report was adopted.

 

 

Schultz from the Committee on Human Services Finance and Policy to which was referred:

 

H. F. No. 1791, A bill for an act relating to local government aid; establishing local homeless prevention aid; appropriating money; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 477A.

 

Reported the same back with the recommendation that the bill be re-referred to the Committee on Taxes.

 

      The report was adopted.

 

 

SECOND READING OF HOUSE BILLS

 

 

      H. F. Nos. 112, 398, 399, 400, 566, 1060, 1407 and 1435 were read for the second time.

 

 

SECOND READING OF SENATE BILLS

 

 

      S. F. No. 1091 was read for the second time.

 

 

INTRODUCTION AND FIRST READING OF HOUSE BILLS

 

 

      The following House Files were introduced:

 

 

Daniels introduced:

 

H. F. No. 1954, A bill for an act relating to transportation; prohibiting the commissioner of public safety from requiring an applicant to disclose a diagnosis of insulin-treated diabetes unless the applicant had a driving-related episode; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 171.13, by adding a subdivision.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Transportation Finance and Policy.


Journal of the House - 21st Day - Monday, March 8, 2021 - Top of Page 876

Mueller introduced:

 

H. F. No. 1955, A bill for an act relating to state government; prohibiting contracts with vendors that produce, manufacture, or procure goods from certain regions in China; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 16C.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on State Government Finance and Elections.

 

 

Mueller, Daniels and Albright introduced:

 

H. F. No. 1956, A bill for an act relating to agriculture; appropriating money for mental health services.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Agriculture Finance and Policy.

 

 

Davids introduced:

 

H. F. No. 1957, A bill for an act relating to taxation; income and corporate franchise; allowing pass-through entities to file as C-option corporations; clarifying treatment of section 179 expensing conformity; excluding loans forgiven under the paycheck protection program from gross income; allowing expense deductions; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, sections 289A.08, by adding a subdivision; 289A.38, by adding a subdivision; 290.01, by adding a subdivision; 290.0132, by adding a subdivision; 290.06, subdivisions 2c, 22; 290.091, subdivision 2; 290.0921, subdivision 2; 290.92, subdivisions 4b, 4c; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 290.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Taxes.

 

 

Davids introduced:

 

H. F. No. 1958, A bill for an act relating to taxation; income; allowing pass-through entities to file as C-option corporations; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, sections 289A.08, by adding a subdivision; 289A.38, by adding a subdivision; 290.01, by adding a subdivision; 290.0132, by adding a subdivision; 290.06, subdivisions 2c, 22; 290.091, subdivision 2; 290.0921, subdivision 2; 290.92, subdivisions 4b, 4c; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 290.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Taxes.

 

 

Davids introduced:

 

H. F. No. 1959, A bill for an act relating to taxation; income; excluding loans forgiven under the paycheck protection program from gross income; allowing expense deductions.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Taxes.

 

 

Igo introduced:

 

H. F. No. 1960, A bill for an act relating to taxation; sales and use; providing a refundable construction exemption for a new and remodeled courts facility in Itasca County; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 297A.71, subdivision 52.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Taxes.


Journal of the House - 21st Day - Monday, March 8, 2021 - Top of Page 877

Mekeland introduced:

 

H. F. No. 1961, A bill for an act relating to capital improvements; appropriating money for an interchange in Becker; authorizing the sale and issuance of state bonds.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Transportation Finance and Policy.

 

 

Pryor and Jurgens introduced:

 

H. F. No. 1962, A bill for an act relating to health care; modifying the duties that may be performed by an unlicensed dental assistant; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 150A.10, subdivisions 2, 2a.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Health Finance and Policy.

 

 

Kresha introduced:

 

H. F. No. 1963, A bill for an act relating to liquor; allowing some transfers of wine between commonly owned liquor stores; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 340A.412, by adding a subdivision.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Commerce Finance and Policy.

 

 

Scott, Hertaus, Bahr and Ecklund introduced:

 

H. F. No. 1964, A bill for an act relating to family law; amending factors in consideration for custody and parenting time for unmarried parents; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 257.025.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Judiciary Finance and Civil Law.

 

 

Quam introduced:

 

H. F. No. 1965, A bill for an act relating to elections, requiring voters who register on election day to cast provisional ballots; making conforming changes; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, sections 171.072; 201.061, subdivisions 1a, 3, 4; 201.121, subdivision 1; 201.225, subdivisions 2, 5; 203B.04, subdivision 4; 203B.07, subdivision 3; 203B.08, subdivision 3; 203B.081, subdivision 3; 203B.121, subdivision 2; 204C.07, subdivision 3a; 204C.32; 204C.33, subdivision 1; 204C.37; 205.065, subdivision 5; 205.185, subdivision 3; 205A.03, subdivision 4; 205A.10, subdivision 3; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 204C; repealing Minnesota Statutes 2020, sections 135A.17, subdivision 2; 201.061, subdivision 7; 201.121, subdivision 3.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on State Government Finance and Elections.

 

 

Quam introduced:

 

H. F. No. 1966, A bill for an act relating to economic development; appropriating money for redevelopment grants and demolition loans, Minnesota investment fund, and the job creation fund.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Workforce and Business Development Finance and Policy.


Journal of the House - 21st Day - Monday, March 8, 2021 - Top of Page 878

Novotny, Johnson, Theis and Daniels introduced:

 

H. F. No. 1967, A bill for an act relating to public safety; increasing penalties for obstructing traffic access to a trunk highway or airport; amending the crime of obstructing transit; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, sections 609.74; 609.855, subdivision 2.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Public Safety and Criminal Justice Reform Finance and Policy.

 

 

Novotny and Theis introduced:

 

H. F. No. 1968, A bill for an act relating to state government; establishing Autism Awareness and Acceptance Day; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 10.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on State Government Finance and Elections.

 

 

Kiel introduced:

 

H. F. No. 1969, A bill for an act relating to health; prohibiting discrimination based on status as a living organ donor; extending paid leave benefits to living organ donors; requiring unpaid leave for organ donors; making a conforming change; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, sections 181.945; 424A.01, subdivision 6; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 62A; repealing Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 181.9456.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Labor, Industry, Veterans and Military Affairs Finance and Policy.

 

 

Howard, Carlson and Elkins introduced:

 

H. F. No. 1970, A bill for an act relating to taxation; tax increment financing; authorizing tax increment financing districts in the city of Bloomington.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Taxes.

 

 

Howard and Her introduced:

 

H. F. No. 1971, A bill for an act relating to taxation; establishing a Minnesota housing tax credit contribution fund; providing a credit against the individual income tax, corporate franchise tax, and insurance premiums for certain contributions; requiring a report; appropriating money; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 297I.20, by adding a subdivision; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapters 290; 462A.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Housing Finance and Policy.

 

 

Howard, Keeler and Her introduced:

 

H. F. No. 1972, A bill for an act relating to higher education; appropriating money to the Office of Higher Education for a competitive grant to an organization providing vocational and life skills training to young adults with learning differences; requiring a report.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Higher Education Finance and Policy.


Journal of the House - 21st Day - Monday, March 8, 2021 - Top of Page 879

Carlson introduced:

 

H. F. No. 1973, A bill for an act relating to health; modifying a provision for the amount taxed for public health; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 145A.131, subdivision 2.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Health Finance and Policy.

 

 

Mortensen introduced:

 

H. F. No. 1974, A bill for an act relating to clean water; appropriating money for restoration of the Minnesota River riverbank in the Shakopee area.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Legacy Finance.

 

 

Lislegard introduced:

 

H. F. No. 1975, A bill for an act relating to taxation; modifying individual income and corporate franchise provisions; proposing a film production credit; allowing the credit to be transferable to offset insurance premiums taxes; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, sections 290.06, by adding a subdivision; 297I.20, by adding a subdivision; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 116U.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Taxes.

 

 

Lislegard introduced:

 

H. F. No. 1976, A bill for an act relating to commerce; establishing certain rights for federal home loan banks with respect to collateral pledged by insurer members; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 60B.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Commerce Finance and Policy.

 

 

Lislegard introduced:

 

H. F. No. 1977, A bill for an act relating to capital investment; authorizing the city of Aurora and the Town of White to enter into a 40-year lease of tax-forfeited land in St. Louis County for a water intake and treatment plant.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Capital Investment.

 

 

Lislegard introduced:

 

H. F. No. 1978, A bill for an act relating to energy; appropriating money for a grant to the Mountain Iron Economic Development Authority to expand a city-owned building housing a solar panel manufacturer.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Climate and Energy Finance and Policy.


Journal of the House - 21st Day - Monday, March 8, 2021 - Top of Page 880

Lislegard introduced:

 

H. F. No. 1979, A bill for an act relating to capital investment; appropriating money for  water and electrical infrastructure improvements at Giants Ridge; authorizing the sale and issuance of state bonds.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Capital Investment.

 

 

Lislegard introduced:

 

H. F. No. 1980, A bill for an act relating to public safety; expanding the information collected and scope of background check conducted for noncitizen permit to carry applicants; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 624.714, subdivisions 3, 4.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Public Safety and Criminal Justice Reform Finance and Policy.

 

 

Olson, B., introduced:

 

H. F. No. 1981, A bill for an act relating to natural resources; appropriating money to assess floodplain improvements.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Environment and Natural Resources Finance and Policy.

 

 

Garofalo introduced:

 

H. F. No. 1982, A bill for an act relating to employment; exempting employees who exclusively work from home from local ordinances regulating the workplace; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 181.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Labor, Industry, Veterans and Military Affairs Finance and Policy.

 

 

Gruenhagen, Davids, Elkins, O'Driscoll, Lucero and Dettmer introduced:

 

H. F. No. 1983, A bill for an act relating to insurance; allowing the sale of life insurance policies that convert to long-term care insurance policies; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, sections 60A.06, subdivision 3; 61A.54; 62S.01, subdivision 18.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Commerce Finance and Policy.

 

 

Gruenhagen introduced:

 

H. F. No. 1984, A bill for an act relating to human services; establishing the family medical account program; providing rulemaking authority; requiring reports; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 256B.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Human Services Finance and Policy.


Journal of the House - 21st Day - Monday, March 8, 2021 - Top of Page 881

Jordan introduced:

 

H. F. No. 1985, A bill for an act relating to education finance; creating a community eligibility provision requirement for school meal program participation; modifying compensatory revenue; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 126C.05, subdivision 3; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 124D.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Education Finance.

 

 

Long introduced:

 

H. F. No. 1986, A bill for an act relating to campaign finance; enacting a Democracy Dollar coupon program; repealing the political contribution refund program; authorizing rulemaking; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, sections 10A.01, subdivision 11; 10A.02, subdivision 13; 10A.15, subdivision 1; 10A.20, subdivision 3; 10A.34, subdivision 4; 289A.37, subdivision 2; 289A.50, subdivision 1; 290.01, subdivision 6; proposing coding for new law as Minnesota Statutes, chapter 10B; repealing Minnesota Statutes 2020, sections 13.4967, subdivision 2; 290.06, subdivision 23.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on State Government Finance and Elections.

 

 

Long introduced:

 

H. F. No. 1987, A bill for an act relating to energy; modifying emissions goals for existing buildings; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 216C.05, subdivision 2.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Climate and Energy Finance and Policy.

 

 

Long introduced:

 

H. F. No. 1988, A bill for an act relating to state government; changing state construction and sustainability provisions; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, sections 16A.15, subdivision 3; 16B.32, subdivisions 1, 1a; 16B.33, subdivisions 1, 3, 3a, by adding a subdivision; 16B.87, subdivision 2; 16C.10, subdivision 2; 16C.32, subdivision 1; repealing Minnesota Statutes 2020, sections 16B.323; 16B.326.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on State Government Finance and Elections.

 

 

Huot introduced:

 

H. F. No. 1989, A bill for an act relating to zoos; appropriating money for the Minnesota Zoological Garden.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Environment and Natural Resources Finance and Policy.

 

 

Petersburg introduced:

 

H. F. No. 1990, A bill for an act relating to data practices; authorizing dissemination of certain data on driver's license and Minnesota identification card holders for replacement Social Security card applications; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 171.12, subdivision 7b.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Transportation Finance and Policy.


Journal of the House - 21st Day - Monday, March 8, 2021 - Top of Page 882

Olson, L., and Her introduced:

 

H. F. No. 1991, A bill for an act relating to housing; appropriating money for public housing rehabilitation; authorizing the sale and issuance of state bonds.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Capital Investment.

 

 

Nelson, M., and Winkler introduced:

 

H. F. No. 1992, A bill for an act relating to employment; modifying prevailing wage requirements; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, sections 116J.871, subdivision 3, by adding a subdivision; 297A.70, by adding a subdivision; 297A.71, subdivision 52; 297A.75, subdivision 1.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Labor, Industry, Veterans and Military Affairs Finance and Policy.

 

 

Bahr introduced:

 

H. F. No. 1993, A bill for an act relating to transportation; terminating operations of the Northstar Commuter Rail service; requiring termination of all agreements and selling of all remaining assets related to Northstar Commuter Rail.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Transportation Finance and Policy.

 

 

Feist, Urdahl, Frazier, Hollins, Berg and Reyer introduced:

 

H. F. No. 1994, A bill for an act relating to education finance; increasing funding and modifying provisions for gifted and talented programs; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, sections 120B.11, subdivision 2; 120B.15; 126C.10, subdivision 2b.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Education Finance.

 

 

Feist, Frazier, Hollins, Berg, Reyer and Her introduced:

 

H. F. No. 1995, A bill for an act relating to education finance; appropriating money for summer education programs; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 126C.10, subdivision 2d; Laws 2019, First Special Session chapter 11, article 1, section 25, subdivision 2, as amended.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Education Finance.

 

 

Akland, Boe, Theis and Albright introduced:

 

H. F. No. 1996, A bill for an act relating to human services; expanding medical assistance coverage to community-based service coordination in jails; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 256B.0625, subdivision 56.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Health Finance and Policy.


Journal of the House - 21st Day - Monday, March 8, 2021 - Top of Page 883

Agbaje introduced:

 

H. F. No. 1997, A bill for an act relating to education finance; appropriating money for Girls in Action programming grant.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Education Finance.

 

 

Agbaje introduced:

 

H. F. No. 1998, A bill for an act relating to state government; requiring the commissioner of administration to place a bust of B. Robert Lewis in the senate chamber in the State Capitol Building; appropriating money.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on State Government Finance and Elections.

 

 

Agbaje and Her introduced:

 

H. F. No. 1999, A bill for an act relating to economic development; appropriating money for minority business development.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Workforce and Business Development Finance and Policy.

 

 

Akland, Theis, Albright and Boe introduced:

 

H. F. No. 2000, A bill for an act relating to adoption; specifying adoption rights and required processes for prospective parents with deafness, blindness, or physical disability; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, sections 259.57, by adding a subdivision; 260C.633.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Human Services Finance and Policy.

 

 

Fischer introduced:

 

H. F. No. 2001, A bill for an act relating to public safety; consolidating various DWI provisions; modifying fine distribution for certain DWIs committed in recreational vehicles; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, sections 84.83, subdivision 5; 86B.705, subdivision 2; 97A.065, subdivision 2; 169A.20, subdivision 1; repealing Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 169A.20, subdivisions 1a, 1b, 1c.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Environment and Natural Resources Finance and Policy.

 

 

Davnie and Her introduced:

 

H. F. No. 2002, A bill for an act relating to education finance; appropriating money for summer education programs; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 126C.10, subdivision 2d; Laws 2019, First Special Session chapter 11, article 1, section 25, subdivision 2, as amended.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Education Finance.


Journal of the House - 21st Day - Monday, March 8, 2021 - Top of Page 884

Demuth introduced:

 

H. F. No. 2003, A bill for an act relating to human services; implementing certain recommendations from the Family Child Care Task Force; directing the commissioner of human services to include representatives of family child care providers in groups developing plans that implement recommendations from the Family Child Care Task Force; requiring counties to forward communications from the department regarding family child care matters to family child care providers; establishing the family child care regulation modernization project; establishing exemption from personal liability for municipality officers or employees; removing exception for counties to be liable for claims at family day care where county had actual knowledge of risk that led to claims; directing the commissioner of human services to develop a one-stop assistance network for family child care providers; appropriating funds for child care provider grants; appropriating funds for a child care business training program grant; appropriating funds for a grant to Minnesota Initiative Foundations to develop action plan for economic development of child care in rural communities; clarifying the meaning of special family day care home; establishing licensing provisions for alternative day care programs; permitting certain providers to operate up to four licensed programs in the same building; requiring a validation study of the Parent Aware program; adding a supervised adult to the definition of helper for family child care programs; permitting family child care training instructors to count two instruction hours for annual training hour requirements; establishing the Family Child Care Training Advisory Committee; creating the Office of Ombudsperson for Child Care Providers; directing the commissioner of human services to modify the ask DHS website function for family child care providers; providing appointments; requiring reports; appropriating money; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, sections 245A.14, subdivision 4; 245A.16, subdivision 1; 245A.50, subdivisions 1a, 7; 466.03, subdivision 6d; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapters 119B; 245A.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Early Childhood Finance and Policy.

 

 

Haley introduced:

 

H. F. No. 2004, A bill for an act relating to health; authorizing incentives for manufacturers that choose to import certain drugs pursuant to "Pathway 2" of the safe importation action plan; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 62J.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Commerce Finance and Policy.

 

 

Long introduced:

 

H. F. No. 2005, A bill for an act relating to labor relations; modifying public labor relations; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, sections 13.43, subdivision 6; 179A.06, subdivision 6, by adding a subdivision; 179A.07, by adding subdivisions; 572B.17.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on State Government Finance and Elections.

 

 

Her introduced:

 

H. F. No. 2006, A bill for an act relating to taxation; individual income; modifying eligibility for the working family credit; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, sections 289A.08, subdivision 11; 290.0671, subdivisions 1, 1a, 7.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Taxes.


Journal of the House - 21st Day - Monday, March 8, 2021 - Top of Page 885

Noor introduced:

 

H. F. No. 2007, A bill for an act relating to economic development; appropriating money to Emerge Community Development.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Workforce and Business Development Finance and Policy.

 

 

Noor introduced:

 

H. F. No. 2008, A bill for an act relating to taxation; sales and use; clarifying the taxation of transfers of prewritten computer software; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 297A.61, subdivision 3.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Taxes.

 

 

Noor introduced:

 

H. F. No. 2009, A bill for an act relating to capital investment; appropriating money for capital improvements at the University of Minnesota; authorizing the sale and issuance of state bonds.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Capital Investment.

 

 

Reyer introduced:

 

H. F. No. 2010, A bill for an act relating to human rights; requiring an interactive process when interacting with individuals with disabilities under chapter 363A; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 363A.08, subdivision 6.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Judiciary Finance and Civil Law.

 

 

Kotyza-Witthuhn introduced:

 

H. F. No. 2011, A bill for an act relating to human services; modifying eligibility, training, and service requirements for intensive nonresidential rehabilitative mental health services; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 256B.0947, subdivisions 2, 3, 5, 6.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Human Services Finance and Policy.

 

 

Richardson introduced:

 

H. F. No. 2012, A bill for an act relating to capital investment; appropriating money for improvements to County State-Aid Highway 71 in Inver Grove Heights;  authorizing the sale and issuance of state bonds.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Capital Investment.


Journal of the House - 21st Day - Monday, March 8, 2021 - Top of Page 886

Vang introduced:

 

H. F. No. 2013, A bill for an act relating to agriculture; modifying industrial hemp provisions; appropriating money; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 18K.04, subdivision 1.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Agriculture Finance and Policy.

 

 

Vang introduced:

 

H. F. No. 2014, A bill for an act relating to agriculture; allowing cottage food producers to sell homemade pet foods; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 25.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Agriculture Finance and Policy.

 

 

Thompson and Fischer introduced:

 

H. F. No. 2015, A bill for an act relating to capital investment; appropriating money for the Rush Line Corridor Transitway; authorizing the sale and issuance of state bonds.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Capital Investment.

 

 

Reyer introduced:

 

H. F. No. 2016, A bill for an act relating to health; modifying certain health indicator reports; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 62U.10, subdivisions 6, 7.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Health Finance and Policy.

 

 

Reyer, Hornstein, Hollins, Berg, Keeler, Frederick and Frazier introduced:

 

H. F. No. 2017, A bill for an act relating to state government; adopting recommendations of the Advisory Task Force on State Employment and Retention of Employees with Disabilities; requiring a report; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, sections 43A.01, subdivision 2; 43A.02, by adding subdivisions; 43A.04, subdivisions 1a, 4, 7; 43A.05, subdivision 1; 43A.09; 43A.10, subdivisions 2a, 7; 43A.14; 43A.15, subdivision 14, by adding a subdivision; 43A.19, subdivision 1; 43A.191; 43A.21, subdivisions 1, 2, 3, by adding a subdivision; 43A.36, subdivision 1; 43A.421; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 43A.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on State Government Finance and Elections.

 

 

Klevorn introduced:

 

H. F. No. 2018, A bill for an act relating to higher education; providing funding to the University of Minnesota; appropriating money.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Higher Education Finance and Policy.


Journal of the House - 21st Day - Monday, March 8, 2021 - Top of Page 887

Xiong, T., introduced:

 

H. F. No. 2019, A bill for an act relating to workforce development; appropriating money for the nonprofit infrastructure grant program.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Workforce and Business Development Finance and Policy.

 

 

Kotyza-Witthuhn and Xiong, T., introduced:

 

H. F. No. 2020, A bill for an act relating to economic development; appropriating money for the SciTech Internship Program.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Workforce and Business Development Finance and Policy.

 

 

Kotyza-Witthuhn introduced:

 

H. F. No. 2021, A bill for an act relating to liquor; allowing off-sales of alcoholic beverages by certain on-sale licensees during the COVID-19 peacetime emergency; amending Laws 2020, chapter 75, section 1.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Commerce Finance and Policy.

 

 

Richardson introduced:

 

H. F. No. 2022, A bill for an act relating to health; occupational licensing; modifying limitations on prescribing and administering certain drugs by optometrists; making technical changes; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 148.56, subdivision 1.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Health Finance and Policy.

 

 

Huot introduced:

 

H. F. No. 2023, A bill for an act relating to health; clarifying requirements for the licensure of facilities that handle medical gases; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 151.01, subdivision 29, by adding subdivisions; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 151; repealing Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 151.19, subdivision 3.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Health Finance and Policy.

 

 

Stephenson introduced:

 

H. F. No. 2024, A bill for an act relating to commerce; modifying various provisions governing or administered by the Department of Commerce; making technical changes; requiring a report; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, sections 60A.71, subdivision 7; 79.55, subdivision 10; 80G.06, subdivision 1; 82.57, subdivisions 1, 5; 82.62, subdivisions 2, 3; 82.81, subdivision 12, by adding a subdivision; 82B.021, subdivision 18; 82B.11, subdivision 3; 332.33, subdivision 3, by adding a subdivision; 386.375, subdivision 3; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapters 80G; 332; repealing Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 45.017.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Commerce Finance and Policy.


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Hornstein introduced:

 

H. F. No. 2025, A bill for an act relating to transportation; regulating railroad safety; appropriating money; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, sections 219.015, subdivisions 1, 2; 219.1651.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Transportation Finance and Policy.

 

 

Hornstein introduced:

 

H. F. No. 2026, A resolution relating to ratification of the proposed Equal Rights Amendment to the United States Constitution; memorializing Congress to remove the extra-textual time limit for ratification of the amendment by the states.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Judiciary Finance and Civil Law.

 

 

Edelson introduced:

 

H. F. No. 2027, A bill for an act relating to public safety; establishing eligibility for release for individuals sentenced to life in prison for crimes committed while under the age of 18; establishing eligibility for early supervised release for certain individuals sentenced for crimes committed while under the age of 18; establishing a Juvenile Release Board; providing for review by the court of appeals; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, sections 244.05, subdivisions 1b, 4, 5, by adding a subdivision; 244.101, subdivision 1; 480A.06, subdivision 4; 609.106, subdivision 2, by adding a subdivision; 609.3455, subdivisions 2, 5; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 244.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Public Safety and Criminal Justice Reform Finance and Policy.

 

 

Hornstein introduced:

 

H. F. No. 2028, A bill for an act relating to environment; clarifying that Pollution Control Agency has authority to regulate greenhouse gas emissions; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, sections 116.06, by adding a subdivision; 116.07, subdivisions 2, 4, 4a.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Environment and Natural Resources Finance and Policy.

 

 

Nelson, M., introduced:

 

H. F. No. 2029, A bill for an act relating to state government; changing the deadline for the November forecast; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 16A.103, subdivision 1.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on State Government Finance and Elections.

 

 

Nelson, M., introduced:

 

H. F. No. 2030, A bill for an act relating to state government; modifying the uses of a positive general fund balance; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 16A.152, subdivision 2.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on State Government Finance and Elections.


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Huot introduced:

 

H. F. No. 2031, A bill for an act relating to education finance; appropriating money for grants for emergency medical services courses.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Education Finance.

 

 

Nelson, M., introduced:

 

H. F. No. 2032, A bill for an act relating to state government; changing a provision of the Legislative Coordinating Commission; amending Minnesota Statutes 2020, section 3.303, subdivision 1.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on State Government Finance and Elections.

 

 

Nelson, M., introduced:

 

H. F. No. 2033, A bill for an act relating to state government; appropriating money for digital preservation and access at the Minnesota Historical Society.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on State Government Finance and Elections.

 

 

Hansen, R., and Lippert introduced:

 

H. F. No. 2034, A bill for an act relating to capital investment; modifying an appropriation for road improvements in Dakota County; amending Laws 2018, chapter 214, article 1, section 16, subdivision 2, as amended.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Capital Investment.

 

 

Albright introduced:

 

H. F. No. 2035, A bill for an act relating to human services; moving the spinal cord injury and traumatic brain injury research grant program to the Department of Human Services; appropriating money; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 256; repealing Minnesota Statutes 2020, sections 136A.901; 136A.902.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Human Services Finance and Policy.

 

 

MOTIONS AND RESOLUTIONS

 

 

      Elkins moved that the name of Gruenhagen be added as an author on H. F. No. 57.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Moller moved that the name of Christensen be added as an author on H. F. No. 75.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Wazlawik moved that the name of Vang be added as an author on H. F. No. 79.  The motion prevailed.


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              Demuth moved that the names of Olson, B., and Akland be added as authors on H. F. No. 131.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Freiberg moved that the name of Xiong, J., be added as an author on H. F. No. 139.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Jurgens moved that the name of Hollins be added as an author on H. F. No. 149.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Jordan moved that the name of Her be added as an author on H. F. No. 155.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Wolgamott moved that the name of O'Driscoll be added as an author on H. F. No. 156.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Noor moved that the name of Stephenson be added as an author on H. F. No. 296.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Becker-Finn moved that the name of Franson be added as an author on H. F. No. 310.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Feist moved that the name of Hausman be added as an author on H. F. No. 321.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Jordan moved that the name of Gomez be added as an author on H. F. No. 358.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Feist moved that the name of Huot be added as an author on H. F. No. 478.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Marquart moved that the name of Davids be added as an author on H. F. No. 497.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Marquart moved that the name of Davids be added as an author on H. F. No. 498.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Marquart moved that the name of Ecklund be added as an author on H. F. No. 501.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Moller moved that the name of Poston be added as an author on H. F. No. 502.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Lee moved that the name of Mariani be added as an author on H. F. No. 507.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Masin moved that the name of Boe be added as an author on H. F. No. 527.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Urdahl moved that the name of Boe be added as an author on H. F. No. 561.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Noor moved that the name of Hollins be added as an author on H. F. No. 611.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Pinto moved that the name of Hausman be added as an author on H. F. No. 614.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Jordan moved that the name of Koznick be added as an author on H. F. No. 625.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Reyer moved that the name of Moller be added as an author on H. F. No. 626.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Lee moved that the name of Hollins be added as an author on H. F. No. 644.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Feist moved that the name of Koznick be added as an author on H. F. No. 657.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Pinto moved that the name of Bierman be added as an author on H. F. No. 694.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Swedzinski moved that the name of Boe be added as an author on H. F. No. 768.  The motion prevailed.


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              Feist moved that the name of Hausman be added as an author on H. F. No. 808.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Edelson moved that the name of Klevorn be added as an author on H. F. No. 813.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Her moved that the name of Hausman be added as an author on H. F. No. 833.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Her moved that the name of Bierman be added as an author on H. F. No. 834.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Scott moved that her name be stricken as an author on H. F. No. 874.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Hassan moved that the name of Daniels be added as an author on H. F. No. 874.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Hassan moved that the names of Berg and Frazier be added as authors on H. F. No. 909.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Edelson moved that the name of Feist be added as an author on H. F. No. 965.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Theis moved that the name of Boe be added as an author on H. F. No. 973.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Schultz moved that the name of Davnie be added as an author on H. F. No. 995.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Gomez moved that the names of Long and West be added as authors on H. F. No. 1020.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Keeler moved that the name of Lee be added as an author on H. F. No. 1042.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Greenman moved that the name of Reyer be added as an author on H. F. No. 1054.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Moller moved that the name of Hassan be added as an author on H. F. No. 1083.  The motion prevailed.

 

      O'Neill moved that the names of Novotny, Raleigh, Johnson, Mueller and Poston be added as authors on H. F. No. 1097.  The motion prevailed.

 

      O'Neill moved that the name of Novotny be added as an author on H. F. No. 1098.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Hollins moved that the names of Long and Edelson be added as authors on H. F. No. 1121.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Torkelson moved that the name of Schomacker be added as an author on H. F. No. 1142.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Agbaje moved that the names of Freiberg and Howard be added as authors on H. F. No. 1151.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Pinto moved that the name of Long be added as an author on H. F. No. 1162.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Wazlawik moved that the name of Acomb be added as an author on H. F. No. 1165.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Stephenson moved that the name of Klevorn be added as an author on H. F. No. 1183.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Olson, L., moved that the name of Feist be added as an author on H. F. No. 1192.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Gomez moved that the name of Christensen be added as an author on H. F. No. 1196.  The motion prevailed.


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              Richardson moved that the name of Freiberg be added as an author on H. F. No. 1200.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Boldon moved that the names of Berg and Lippert be added as authors on H. F. No. 1278.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Koegel moved that the name of Jurgens be added as an author on H. F. No. 1281.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Hansen, R., moved that the name of Huot be added as an author on H. F. No. 1294.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Rasmusson moved that the name of Hanson, J., be added as an author on H. F. No. 1305.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Baker moved that the names of Stephenson and Davnie be added as authors on H. F. No. 1324.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Her moved that the name of Moller be added as an author on H. F. No. 1333.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Koegel moved that the name of Xiong, T., be added as an author on H. F. No. 1383.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Becker-Finn moved that the name of Koznick be added as an author on H. F. No. 1401.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Acomb moved that the names of Hausman and Feist be added as authors on H. F. No. 1427.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Vang moved that the names of Franson, Lucero, Poston, Gomez and Mekeland be added as authors on H. F. No. 1430.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Greenman moved that the name of Davnie be added as an author on H. F. No. 1460.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Dettmer moved that the name of Christensen be added as an author on H. F. No. 1461.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Dettmer moved that the name of Christensen be added as an author on H. F. No. 1462.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Scott moved that the name of Moller be added as an author on H. F. No. 1488.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Hansen, R., moved that the name of Huot be added as an author on H. F. No. 1491.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Fischer moved that the name of Vang be added as an author on H. F. No. 1495.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Feist moved that the name of Hausman be added as an author on H. F. No. 1497.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Howard moved that the name of Wolgamott be added as an author on H. F. No. 1517.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Kotyza-Witthuhn moved that the name of Pinto be added as an author on H. F. No. 1568.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Scott moved that the name of Baker be added as an author on H. F. No. 1582.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Klevorn moved that the name of Davnie be added as an author on H. F. No. 1585.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Johnson moved that the names of Rasmusson and Bennett be added as authors on H. F. No. 1593.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Liebling moved that the name of Feist be added as an author on H. F. No. 1609.  The motion prevailed.


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              Poston moved that the names of Baker and Nash be added as authors on H. F. No. 1643.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Hollins moved that the name of Olson, L., be added as an author on H. F. No. 1651.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Moller moved that the names of Bierman, Hollins and Feist be added as authors on H. F. No. 1654.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Lucero moved that the name of Drazkowski be added as an author on H. F. No. 1657.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Feist moved that her name be stricken as an author on H. F. No. 1709.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Wolgamott moved that the names of Feist, Rasmusson, Vang and Backer be added as authors on H. F. No. 1710.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Xiong, J., moved that the name of Koznick be added as an author on H. F. No. 1724.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Boldon moved that the names of Berg, Greenman, Feist, Freiberg, Reyer and Lippert be added as authors on H. F. No. 1747.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Christensen moved that the names of Long, Lislegard, Acomb, Lee and Igo be added as authors on H. F. No. 1750.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Frazier moved that the name of Agbaje be added as an author on H. F. No. 1771.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Frazier moved that the name of Agbaje be added as an author on H. F. No. 1772.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Richardson moved that the name of Vang be added as an author on H. F. No. 1782.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Her moved that the name of Nelson, M., be added as an author on H. F. No. 1803.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Pelowski moved that the name of Petersburg be added as an author on H. F. No. 1811.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Klevorn moved that the names of Youakim and Greenman be added as authors on H. F. No. 1815.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Frazier moved that the name of Long be added as an author on H. F. No. 1817.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Bierman moved that the name of Munson be added as an author on H. F. No. 1851.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Bierman moved that the name of Youakim be added as an author on H. F. No. 1853.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Feist moved that the name of Vang be added as an author on H. F. No. 1856.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Long moved that the name of Becker-Finn be added as an author on H. F. No. 1863.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Pryor moved that the names of Pinto and Youakim be added as authors on H. F. No. 1876.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Hansen, R., moved that the names of Lee and Lippert be added as authors on H. F. No. 1877.  The motion prevailed.


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              Xiong, J., moved that the name of Her be added as an author on H. F. No. 1889.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Christensen moved that the name of Urdahl be added as an author on H. F. No. 1905.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Hollins moved that the names of Christensen and Bierman be added as authors on H. F. No. 1924.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Drazkowski moved that the name of Munson be added as an author on H. F. No. 1933.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Heintzeman moved that the name of Poston be added as an author on H. F. No. 1934.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Reyer moved that the name of Masin be added as an author on H. F. No. 1951.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Morrison moved that H. F. No. 572 be recalled from the Committee on Taxes and be re-referred to the Committee on Health Finance and Policy.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Marquart moved that H. F. No. 1019, now on the General Register, be re-referred to the Committee on Taxes.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Edelson moved that H. F. No. 1124 be recalled from the Committee on Health Finance and Policy and be re‑referred to the Committee on Education Policy.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Hassan moved that H. F. No. 1389 be recalled from the Committee on Human Services Finance and Policy and be re-referred to the Committee on Capital Investment.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Wolgamott moved that H. F. No. 1822 be recalled from the Committee on Health Finance and Policy and be re‑referred to the Committee on Human Services Finance and Policy.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Bierman moved that H. F. No. 1854 be recalled from the Committee on Human Services Finance and Policy and be re-referred to the Committee on Health Finance and Policy.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Reyer moved that H. F. No. 1918 be recalled from the Committee on Human Services Finance and Policy and be re-referred to the Committee on Health Finance and Policy.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Reyer moved that H. F. No. 1951 be recalled from the Committee on Capital Investment and be re-referred to the Committee on Transportation Finance and Policy.  The motion prevailed.

 

 

      Haley moved that House Concurrent Resolution No. 1 be recalled from the Committee on Rules and Legislative Administration and be placed upon its adoption.

 

 

      A roll call was requested and properly seconded.

 

 

      The question was taken on the Haley motion and the roll was called.  There were 62 yeas and 69 nays as follows:

 

      Those who voted in the affirmative were:

 


Akland

Albright

Anderson

Backer

Bahr

Baker

Bennett

Bliss

Boe

Burkel

Daniels

Daudt

Davids

Demuth

Dettmer

Drazkowski

Erickson

Franke


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Franson

Garofalo

Green

Gruenhagen

Haley

Hamilton

Heinrich

Heintzeman

Hertaus

Igo

Johnson

Jurgens

Kiel

Koznick

Kresha

Lucero

Lueck

McDonald

Mekeland

Mortensen

Mueller

Munson

Nash

Nelson, N.

Neu Brindley

Novotny

O'Driscoll

Olson, B.

O'Neill

Petersburg

Pfarr

Pierson

Poston

Quam

Raleigh

Rasmusson

Robbins

Schomacker

Scott

Swedzinski

Theis

Torkelson

Urdahl

West


 

      Those who voted in the negative were:

 


Acomb

Agbaje

Bahner

Becker-Finn

Berg

Bernardy

Bierman

Boldon

Carlson

Christensen

Davnie

Ecklund

Edelson

Elkins

Feist

Fischer

Frazier

Frederick

Freiberg

Gomez

Greenman

Hansen, R.

Hanson, J.

Hassan

Hausman

Her

Hollins

Hornstein

Howard

Huot

Jordan

Keeler

Klevorn

Koegel

Kotyza-Witthuhn

Lee

Liebling

Lillie

Lippert

Lislegard

Long

Mariani

Marquart

Masin

Moller

Moran

Morrison

Murphy

Nelson, M.

Noor

Olson, L.

Pelowski

Pinto

Pryor

Reyer

Richardson

Sandell

Schultz

Stephenson

Sundin

Thompson

Vang

Wazlawik

Winkler

Wolgamott

Xiong, J.

Xiong, T.

Youakim

Spk. Hortman


 

 

      The motion did not prevail.

 

 

      Igo and Daudt introduced:

 

House Concurrent Resolution No. 6, A House concurrent resolution expressing the sense of the Minnesota House of Representatives concerning the use of Minnesota mineral resources as key components of technically advanced energy and telecommunications devices.

 

      The concurrent resolution was referred to the Committee on Rules and Legislative Administration.

 

 

ADJOURNMENT

 

      Winkler moved that when the House adjourns today it adjourn until 12:00 noon, Tuesday, March 9, 2021.  The motion prevailed.

 

      Winkler moved that the House adjourn.  The motion prevailed, and the Speaker declared the House stands adjourned until 12:00 noon, Tuesday, March 9, 2021.

 

 

Patrick D. Murphy, Chief Clerk, House of Representatives

 

 


 


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