Journal of the House - 97th Day - Sunday, May 17, 2020 - Top of Page 8747

STATE OF MINNESOTA

 

Journal of the House

 

NINETY-FIRST SESSION - 2020

 

_____________________

 

NINETY-SEVENTH DAY

 

Saint Paul, Minnesota, Sunday, May 17, 2020

 

 

      The House of Representatives convened at 10:00 a.m. and was called to order by Laurie Halverson, Speaker pro tempore.

 

      Prayer was offered by Representative Todd Lippert, District 20B, Northfield, Minnesota.

 

      The members of the House gave the pledge of allegiance to the flag of the United States of America.

 

      The roll was called and the following members were present:

 


Acomb

Albright

Anderson

Backer

Bahner

Bahr

Baker

Becker-Finn

Bennett

Bernardy

Bierman

Boe

Brand

Cantrell

Carlson, A.

Carlson, L.

Christensen

Claflin

Considine

Daniels

Daudt

Davids

Davnie

Dehn

Demuth

Dettmer

Drazkowski

Ecklund

Edelson

Elkins

Erickson

Fabian

Fischer

Franson

Freiberg

Garofalo

Gomez

Green

Grossell

Gruenhagen

Gunther

Haley

Halverson

Hamilton

Hansen

Hassan

Hausman

Heinrich

Heintzeman

Her

Hertaus

Hornstein

Howard

Huot

Johnson

Jordan

Jurgens

Kiel

Klevorn

Koegel

Kotyza-Witthuhn

Koznick

Kresha

Kunesh-Podein

Layman

Lee

Lesch

Liebling

Lien

Lillie

Lippert

Lislegard

Long

Lucero

Lueck

Mahoney

Mann

Mariani

Marquart

Masin

McDonald

Mekeland

Miller

Moller

Moran

Morrison

Munson

Murphy

Nash

Nelson, M.

Nelson, N.

Neu

Noor

Nornes

Novotny

O'Driscoll

Olson

O'Neill

Pelowski

Persell

Petersburg

Pierson

Pinto

Poppe

Poston

Pryor

Quam

Richardson

Robbins

Runbeck

Sandell

Sandstede

Sauke

Schomacker

Schultz

Scott

Stephenson

Sundin

Swedzinski

Tabke

Theis

Torkelson

Urdahl

Vang

Vogel

Wagenius

Wazlawik

West

Winkler

Wolgamott

Xiong, J.

Xiong, T.

Youakim


 

      A quorum was present.

 

      Hortman was excused until 12:40 p.m.

 

      The Chief Clerk proceeded to read the Journal of the preceding day.  There being no objection, further reading of the Journal was dispensed with and the Journal was approved as corrected by the Chief Clerk.


Journal of the House - 97th Day - Sunday, May 17, 2020 - Top of Page 8748

INTRODUCTION AND FIRST READING OF HOUSE BILLS

 

 

      The following House Files were introduced:

 

 

Mann and Morrison introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4693, A bill for an act relating to health care; providing criminal, civil, and administrative immunity to persons engaged in health care services during the peacetime public health emergency; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 604A.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Judiciary Finance and Civil Law Division.

 

 

Runbeck and Gruenhagen introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4694, A bill for an act relating to health; prohibiting the provision of gender transition medical services to and performance of gender reassignment surgery for persons under the age of 18; amending Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 60A.0784; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 214.

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Health and Human Services Policy.

 

 

Demuth introduced:

 

H. F. No. 4695, A joint resolution honoring the community volunteers of Marty, Minnesota, for their dedicated volunteer work in the wake of the Blackhawk helicopter crash in central Minnesota

 

The bill was read for the first time and referred to the Committee on Rules and Legislative Administration.

 

 

REPORTS FROM THE COMMITTEE ON RULES

AND LEGISLATIVE ADMINISTRATION

 

      Winkler for the Committee on Rules and Legislative Administration offered the following resolution and moved its adoption:

 

      Be It Resolved, by the House of Representatives of the State of Minnesota, that the Chief Clerk is directed to correct and approve the Journal of the House for the last day of the 2020 Regular Session.

 

      Be It Further Resolved that the Chief Clerk is authorized to include in the Journal for the last day of the 2020 Regular Session any proceedings, including subsequent proceedings and any legislative interim committees or commissions created or appointments made to them by legislative action or by law.

 

 

      The motion prevailed and the resolution was adopted.


Journal of the House - 97th Day - Sunday, May 17, 2020 - Top of Page 8749

           Winkler for the Committee on Rules and Legislative Administration offered the following resolution and moved its adoption:

 

      Be It Resolved, by the House of Representatives of the State of Minnesota, that during the time between adjournment in 2020 and the convening of the House of Representatives in 2021, the Chief Clerk and Chief Sergeant at Arms under the direction of the Speaker shall maintain House facilities in the Capitol Complex.  The House chamber, retiring room, hearing and conference rooms, and offices shall be set up and made ready for legislative use and reserved for the House and its committees.  Those rooms may be reserved for use by others that are not in conflict with use by the House.  The House Chamber, retiring room, and hearing rooms may be used by YMCA Youth in Government, Girls' State, Young Leaders Organization, and 4-H Leadership Conference.

 

 

      The motion prevailed and the resolution was adopted.

 

 

      Winkler for the Committee on Rules and Legislative Administration offered the following resolution and moved its adoption:

 

      Be It Resolved, by the House of Representatives of the State of Minnesota, that it retains the use of parking lots C, D, N, and the state office building parking ramp for members and employees of the House of Representatives during the time between adjournment in 2020 and the convening of the House of Representatives in 2021.  The Sergeant at Arms is directed to manage the use of the lots and ramp while the House of Representatives is adjourned.  The Controller of the House may continue to deduct from the check of any legislator or legislative employee a sum adequate to cover the exercise of the parking privilege.

 

 

      The motion prevailed and the resolution was adopted.

 

 

      Winkler moved that the House recess subject to the call of the Chair.  The motion prevailed.

 

 

RECESS

 

 

RECONVENED

 

      The House reconvened and was called to order by the Speaker.

 

 

      Lislegard was excused for the remainder of today's session.

 

 

MOTIONS AND RESOLUTIONS

 

 

SUSPENSION OF RULES

 

      Winkler moved that the rules of the House be so far suspended so that S. F. No. 2898 be recalled from the State Government Finance Division, be given its second and third readings and be placed upon its final passage.  The motion prevailed.


Journal of the House - 97th Day - Sunday, May 17, 2020 - Top of Page 8750

           Pursuant to Article IV, Section 19, of the Constitution of the state of Minnesota, Winkler moved that the rule therein be suspended and an urgency be declared so that S. F. No. 2898 be given its second and third readings and be placed upon its final passage.

 

 

      The question was taken on the Winkler motion and the roll was called.  There were 128 yeas and 3 nays as follows:

 

      Those who voted in the affirmative were:

 


Acomb

Albright

Anderson

Backer

Bahner

Bahr

Baker

Becker-Finn

Bennett

Bernardy

Bierman

Boe

Brand

Cantrell

Carlson, A.

Carlson, L.

Christensen

Claflin

Considine

Daniels

Daudt

Davids

Davnie

Dehn

Demuth

Dettmer

Drazkowski

Ecklund

Edelson

Elkins

Erickson

Fabian

Fischer

Franson

Freiberg

Garofalo

Gomez

Green

Grossell

Gruenhagen

Gunther

Haley

Halverson

Hamilton

Hansen

Hassan

Hausman

Heinrich

Heintzeman

Her

Hertaus

Hornstein

Howard

Huot

Johnson

Jordan

Jurgens

Kiel

Klevorn

Koegel

Kotyza-Witthuhn

Koznick

Kresha

Kunesh-Podein

Layman

Lee

Lesch

Liebling

Lien

Lillie

Lippert

Long

Lucero

Lueck

Mann

Mariani

Marquart

Masin

McDonald

Mekeland

Miller

Moller

Moran

Morrison

Munson

Nash

Nelson, N.

Neu

Noor

Nornes

Novotny

Olson

O'Neill

Pelowski

Persell

Petersburg

Pierson

Pinto

Poppe

Poston

Pryor

Quam

Richardson

Robbins

Runbeck

Sandell

Sandstede

Sauke

Schomacker

Schultz

Scott

Stephenson

Sundin

Swedzinski

Tabke

Theis

Torkelson

Urdahl

Vang

Vogel

Wagenius

Wazlawik

West

Wolgamott

Xiong, J.

Xiong, T.

Youakim

Spk. Hortman


 

      Those who voted in the negative were:

 


Mahoney

Nelson, M.

O'Driscoll


 

 

      The motion prevailed.

 

 

      S. F. No. 2898 was read for the second time.

 

 

      Winkler was excused between the hours of 12:50 p.m. and 1:15 p.m.

 

      Murphy was excused between the hours of 12:50 p.m. and 1:20 p.m.

 

 

      S. F. No. 2898, A bill for an act relating to state government; exempting hairstyling and makeup application from licensing; modifying an appropriation; amending Minnesota Statutes 2018, sections 155A.23, by adding subdivisions; 155A.27, subdivision 9; 155A.29, by adding a subdivision; Laws 2019, First Special Session chapter 10, article 1, section 28.

 

 

      The bill was read for the third time and placed upon its final passage.


Journal of the House - 97th Day - Sunday, May 17, 2020 - Top of Page 8751

           The question was taken on the passage of the bill and the roll was called.  There were 128 yeas and 4 nays as follows:

 

      Those who voted in the affirmative were:

 


Acomb

Albright

Anderson

Backer

Bahner

Bahr

Baker

Becker-Finn

Bennett

Bernardy

Bierman

Boe

Brand

Cantrell

Carlson, A.

Carlson, L.

Christensen

Claflin

Considine

Daniels

Daudt

Davids

Davnie

Dehn

Demuth

Dettmer

Drazkowski

Ecklund

Edelson

Elkins

Erickson

Fabian

Fischer

Franson

Freiberg

Garofalo

Gomez

Green

Grossell

Gruenhagen

Gunther

Haley

Halverson

Hamilton

Hansen

Hassan

Hausman

Heinrich

Heintzeman

Her

Hertaus

Hornstein

Howard

Huot

Johnson

Jordan

Jurgens

Kiel

Klevorn

Koegel

Kotyza-Witthuhn

Koznick

Kresha

Kunesh-Podein

Layman

Lee

Lesch

Liebling

Lien

Lillie

Lippert

Long

Lucero

Lueck

Mann

Mariani

Marquart

Masin

McDonald

Mekeland

Miller

Moller

Moran

Morrison

Munson

Nash

Nelson, N.

Neu

Noor

Nornes

Novotny

Olson

O'Neill

Pelowski

Persell

Petersburg

Pierson

Pinto

Poppe

Poston

Pryor

Quam

Richardson

Robbins

Runbeck

Sandell

Sandstede

Sauke

Schomacker

Schultz

Scott

Stephenson

Swedzinski

Tabke

Theis

Torkelson

Urdahl

Vang

Vogel

Wagenius

Wazlawik

West

Winkler

Wolgamott

Xiong, J.

Xiong, T.

Youakim

Spk. Hortman


 

      Those who voted in the negative were:

 


Mahoney

Nelson, M.

O'Driscoll

Sundin


 

 

      The bill was passed and its title agreed to.

 

 

      There being no objection, the order of business reverted to Calendar for the Day.

 

 

CALENDAR FOR THE DAY

 

 

      S. F. No. 3800, A bill for an act relating to commerce; regulating certain conduct relating to the timing of money transmission; amending Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 53B.18.

 

 

      The bill was read for the third time and placed upon its final passage.

 

      The question was taken on the passage of the bill and the roll was called.  There were 132 yeas and 1 nay as follows:

 

      Those who voted in the affirmative were:

 


Acomb

Albright

Anderson

Backer

Bahner

Bahr

Baker

Becker-Finn

Bennett

Bernardy

Bierman

Boe

Brand

Cantrell

Carlson, A.

Carlson, L.

Christensen

Claflin


Journal of the House - 97th Day - Sunday, May 17, 2020 - Top of Page 8752

Considine

Daniels

Daudt

Davids

Davnie

Dehn

Demuth

Dettmer

Drazkowski

Ecklund

Edelson

Elkins

Erickson

Fabian

Fischer

Franson

Freiberg

Garofalo

Gomez

Green

Grossell

Gruenhagen

Gunther

Haley

Halverson

Hamilton

Hansen

Hassan

Hausman

Heinrich

Heintzeman

Her

Hornstein

Howard

Huot

Johnson

Jordan

Jurgens

Kiel

Klevorn

Koegel

Kotyza-Witthuhn

Koznick

Kresha

Kunesh-Podein

Layman

Lee

Lesch

Liebling

Lien

Lillie

Lippert

Long

Lucero

Lueck

Mahoney

Mann

Mariani

Marquart

Masin

McDonald

Mekeland

Miller

Moller

Moran

Morrison

Munson

Murphy

Nash

Nelson, M.

Nelson, N.

Neu

Noor

Nornes

Novotny

O'Driscoll

Olson

O'Neill

Pelowski

Persell

Petersburg

Pierson

Pinto

Poppe

Poston

Pryor

Quam

Richardson

Robbins

Runbeck

Sandell

Sandstede

Sauke

Schomacker

Schultz

Scott

Stephenson

Sundin

Swedzinski

Tabke

Theis

Torkelson

Urdahl

Vang

Vogel

Wagenius

Wazlawik

West

Winkler

Wolgamott

Xiong, J.

Xiong, T.

Youakim

Spk. Hortman


 

      Those who voted in the negative were:

 


Hertaus


 

 

      The bill was passed and its title agreed to.

 

 

      The Speaker called Olson to the Chair.

 

 

      S. F. No. 3808, A bill for an act relating to retirement; authorizing new categories of investments for the State Board of Investment; excluding new trades employees from Public Employees Retirement Association general plan coverage and grandfathering currently covered members; permitting contributions to multiemployer plans for employees in the building and constructions trades by the city of St. Paul and the St. Paul School District; revising augmentation for certain privatized medical facilities and their employees; amending requirements for reporting by pension funds to the state auditor; making changes of an administrative nature for the Minnesota State Retirement System, the Public Employees Retirement Association, the statewide volunteer firefighter plan, and the Teachers Retirement Association; authorizing the purchase of service credit for a certain Maplewood firefighter; increasing the maximum for lump sum pensions for volunteer firefighter relief associations; revising the allocation of fire state aid; assigning fire state aid to the city of Eagan; providing new procedures for volunteer firefighter relief association dissolution and termination of its retirement plan; providing for the dissolution of the Brooklyn Park Firefighter Relief Association and the termination of the retirement plan; providing for the division of the Ramsey Volunteer Firefighters' Relief Association and the transfer of accounts to a relief association affiliated with the city of Nowthen; authorizing relief associations to convert from a defined benefit plan to a defined contribution plan; implementing the recommendations of the state auditor's volunteer firefighter working group; temporarily extending the grandfather provision regarding actuarial assumptions used to compute an annuity in the Minnesota State Retirement System unclassified plan; amending Minnesota Statutes 2018, sections 11A.24, subdivisions 1, 6; 352.01, subdivision 26; 352.04, subdivisions 4, 8, by adding a subdivision; 352.113, subdivision 4; 352.95, subdivision 3; 352B.011, subdivisions 6, 10; 352B.10, subdivision 2a; 352D.06, subdivision 1; 353.29, subdivisions 1, 7; 353.30, subdivision 3c; 353.31, subdivision 8; 353.32, subdivision 4; 353.651, subdivision 1; 353.656, subdivisions 1, 3; 353.657, subdivision 1; 353F.02, by adding subdivisions; 353F.04; 353G.01, by adding a subdivision; 353G.05, subdivisions 1, 5, by adding a subdivision; 353G.09, subdivision 3, by adding a subdivision; 353G.11, subdivision 2; 353G.121; 354.05, subdivisions 2, 41; 354.44, subdivisions 4, 6; 354.46, subdivision 2;


Journal of the House - 97th Day - Sunday, May 17, 2020 - Top of Page 8753

354.49, subdivision 2; 354.543, subdivision 3; 356.219, subdivisions 1, 6, 7; 356.24, subdivision 1, by adding a subdivision; 424A.003; 424A.02, subdivision 3; 424A.03, as amended; 424A.092, subdivisions 1, 2; 424B.01, by adding subdivisions; 490.121, subdivision 7c; 490.123, subdivision 5; 490.124, subdivision 1; Minnesota Statutes 2019 Supplement, sections 352.04, subdivision 9; 352.113, subdivision 2; 352.23; 353.01, subdivision 2b; 353.0141, subdivision 1; 353.34, subdivision 3; 353.371, subdivisions 1, 2, by adding a subdivision; 356.219, subdivisions 3, 8; 424A.014, subdivision 1; 424A.016, subdivisions 4, 6; 477B.04, subdivision 3; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapters 356; 424B; 477B; repealing Minnesota Statutes 2018, sections 353.30, subdivision 4; 354.55, subdivision 10; 356.24, subdivision 2; 356.44; 424B.20; 424B.21; Laws 1980, chapter 607, section 13; Laws 2018, chapter 211, article 14, section 29.

 

 

      The bill was read for the third time and placed upon its final passage.

 

      The question was taken on the passage of the bill and the roll was called.  There were 133 yeas and 0 nays as follows:

 

      Those who voted in the affirmative were:

 


Acomb

Albright

Anderson

Backer

Bahner

Bahr

Baker

Becker-Finn

Bennett

Bernardy

Bierman

Boe

Brand

Cantrell

Carlson, A.

Carlson, L.

Christensen

Claflin

Considine

Daniels

Daudt

Davids

Davnie

Dehn

Demuth

Dettmer

Drazkowski

Ecklund

Edelson

Elkins

Erickson

Fabian

Fischer

Franson

Freiberg

Garofalo

Gomez

Green

Grossell

Gruenhagen

Gunther

Haley

Halverson

Hamilton

Hansen

Hassan

Hausman

Heinrich

Heintzeman

Her

Hertaus

Hornstein

Howard

Huot

Johnson

Jordan

Jurgens

Kiel

Klevorn

Koegel

Kotyza-Witthuhn

Koznick

Kresha

Kunesh-Podein

Layman

Lee

Lesch

Liebling

Lien

Lillie

Lippert

Long

Lucero

Lueck

Mahoney

Mann

Mariani

Marquart

Masin

McDonald

Mekeland

Miller

Moller

Moran

Morrison

Munson

Murphy

Nash

Nelson, M.

Nelson, N.

Neu

Noor

Nornes

Novotny

O'Driscoll

Olson

O'Neill

Pelowski

Persell

Petersburg

Pierson

Pinto

Poppe

Poston

Pryor

Quam

Richardson

Robbins

Runbeck

Sandell

Sandstede

Sauke

Schomacker

Schultz

Scott

Stephenson

Sundin

Swedzinski

Tabke

Theis

Torkelson

Urdahl

Vang

Vogel

Wagenius

Wazlawik

West

Winkler

Wolgamott

Xiong, J.

Xiong, T.

Youakim

Spk. Hortman


 

 

      The bill was passed and its title agreed to.

 

 

      Daudt was excused between the hours of 1:45 p.m. and 2:55 p.m.

 

      Hortman was excused between the hours of 1:45 p.m. and 5:30 p.m.

 

 

      S. F. No. 3683, A bill for an act relating to higher education; providing for policy changes for the Office of Higher Education, including financial aid, institutional approval, and the Minnesota college savings plan; amending Minnesota Statutes 2018, sections 124D.09, subdivision 10a; 135A.15, subdivision 1a; 136A.01, subdivision 1;


Journal of the House - 97th Day - Sunday, May 17, 2020 - Top of Page 8754

136A.031, subdivision 3; 136A.103; 136A.121, by adding a subdivision; 136A.125, subdivision 3; 136A.1275, subdivision 1; 136A.1701, subdivision 4; 136A.1791, subdivisions 1, 3; 136A.1795, subdivision 4; 136A.65, subdivisions 4, 7, 8; 136A.653, subdivision 1; 136A.657, subdivisions 1, 2, 3; 136A.658; 136A.69, subdivisions 1, 4; 136A.824, subdivision 4; 136A.827, subdivision 4; 136A.829, subdivision 1; 136A.833, subdivision 1; 136A.834, subdivisions 1, 2; 136G.01; 136G.03, subdivisions 8, 10, 11, 20, 31, by adding a subdivision; 136G.05, subdivisions 2, 5, 7; 136G.09, subdivisions 6, 8; 136G.11, subdivisions 11, 13; 136G.13; 136G.14; Minnesota Statutes 2019 Supplement, sections 136A.64, subdivision 1; 136A.646; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 136A; repealing Minnesota Statutes 2018, sections 136G.03, subdivisions 4, 22; 136G.05, subdivision 6.

 

 

      The bill was read for the third time and placed upon its final passage.

 

      The question was taken on the passage of the bill and the roll was called.  There were 126 yeas and 5 nays as follows:

 

      Those who voted in the affirmative were:

 


Acomb

Albright

Anderson

Backer

Bahner

Baker

Becker-Finn

Bennett

Bernardy

Bierman

Boe

Brand

Cantrell

Carlson, A.

Carlson, L.

Christensen

Claflin

Considine

Daniels

Davids

Davnie

Dehn

Demuth

Dettmer

Ecklund

Edelson

Elkins

Erickson

Fabian

Fischer

Franson

Freiberg

Garofalo

Gomez

Green

Grossell

Gruenhagen

Gunther

Haley

Halverson

Hamilton

Hansen

Hassan

Hausman

Heinrich

Heintzeman

Her

Hornstein

Howard

Huot

Johnson

Jordan

Jurgens

Kiel

Klevorn

Koegel

Kotyza-Witthuhn

Koznick

Kresha

Kunesh-Podein

Layman

Lee

Lesch

Liebling

Lien

Lillie

Lippert

Long

Lucero

Lueck

Mahoney

Mann

Mariani

Marquart

Masin

McDonald

Miller

Moller

Moran

Morrison

Murphy

Nash

Nelson, M.

Nelson, N.

Neu

Noor

Nornes

Novotny

O'Driscoll

Olson

O'Neill

Pelowski

Persell

Petersburg

Pierson

Pinto

Poppe

Poston

Pryor

Quam

Richardson

Robbins

Runbeck

Sandell

Sandstede

Sauke

Schomacker

Schultz

Scott

Stephenson

Sundin

Swedzinski

Tabke

Theis

Torkelson

Urdahl

Vang

Vogel

Wagenius

Wazlawik

West

Winkler

Wolgamott

Xiong, J.

Xiong, T.

Youakim


 

      Those who voted in the negative were:

 


Bahr

Drazkowski

Hertaus

Mekeland

Munson


 

 

      The bill was passed and its title agreed to.

 

 

      S. F. No. 3258, A bill for an act relating to public safety; modifying definition of peace officer; modifying corrections provisions; modifying use of criminal justice data communications network; providing for temporary changes to certain grant programs; providing criminal penalties; amending Minnesota Statutes 2018, sections 169A.03, subdivision 18; 241.021, by adding a subdivision; 241.80; 242.192; 299C.46, subdivision 3, as amended; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 243; repealing Minnesota Statutes 2018, sections 383A.404; 401.13.


Journal of the House - 97th Day - Sunday, May 17, 2020 - Top of Page 8755

           The bill was read for the third time and placed upon its final passage.

 

      The question was taken on the passage of the bill and the roll was called.  There were 129 yeas and 2 nays as follows:

 

      Those who voted in the affirmative were:

 


Acomb

Anderson

Backer

Bahner

Bahr

Baker

Becker-Finn

Bennett

Bernardy

Bierman

Boe

Brand

Cantrell

Carlson, A.

Carlson, L.

Christensen

Claflin

Considine

Daniels

Daudt

Davids

Davnie

Dehn

Demuth

Dettmer

Drazkowski

Ecklund

Edelson

Elkins

Erickson

Fabian

Fischer

Franson

Freiberg

Garofalo

Gomez

Grossell

Gruenhagen

Gunther

Haley

Halverson

Hamilton

Hansen

Hassan

Hausman

Heinrich

Heintzeman

Her

Hertaus

Hornstein

Howard

Huot

Johnson

Jordan

Jurgens

Kiel

Klevorn

Koegel

Kotyza-Witthuhn

Koznick

Kresha

Kunesh-Podein

Layman

Lee

Lesch

Liebling

Lien

Lillie

Lippert

Long

Lucero

Lueck

Mahoney

Mann

Mariani

Marquart

Masin

McDonald

Mekeland

Miller

Moller

Moran

Morrison

Munson

Murphy

Nash

Nelson, M.

Nelson, N.

Neu

Noor

Nornes

Novotny

O'Driscoll

Olson

O'Neill

Pelowski

Persell

Petersburg

Pierson

Pinto

Poppe

Poston

Pryor

Quam

Richardson

Robbins

Runbeck

Sandell

Sandstede

Sauke

Schomacker

Schultz

Scott

Stephenson

Sundin

Swedzinski

Tabke

Theis

Torkelson

Urdahl

Vang

Vogel

Wagenius

Wazlawik

West

Winkler

Wolgamott

Xiong, T.

Youakim


 

      Those who voted in the negative were:

 


Albright

Green


 

 

      The bill was passed and its title agreed to.

 

 

      Grossell was excused between the hours of 3:00 p.m. and 6:40 p.m.

 

 

      H. F. No. 163 was reported to the House.

 

 

Youakim moved to amend H. F. No. 163, the first engrossment, as follows:

 

Delete everything after the enacting clause and insert:

 

"ARTICLE 1

GENERAL EDUCATION

 

Section 1.  Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 123B.52, subdivision 1, is amended to read:

 

Subdivision 1.  Contracts.  A contract for work or labor, or for the purchase of furniture, fixtures, or other property, except books registered under the copyright laws and information systems software, or for the construction or repair of school houses, the estimated cost or value of which shall exceed that specified in section 471.345,


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subdivision 3, must not be made by the school board without first advertising for bids or proposals by two weeks' published notice in the official newspaper.  This notice must state the time and place of receiving bids and contain a brief description of the subject matter.

 

Additional publication in the official newspaper or elsewhere may be made as the board shall deem necessary.

 

After taking into consideration conformity with the specifications, terms of delivery, and other conditions imposed in the call for bids, every such contract for which a call for bids has been issued must be awarded to the lowest responsible bidder, be duly executed in writing, and be otherwise conditioned as required by law.  The person to whom the contract is awarded shall give a sufficient bond to the board for its faithful performance.  Notwithstanding section 574.26 or any other law to the contrary, on a contract limited to the purchase of a finished tangible product, a board may require, at its discretion, a performance bond of a contractor in the amount the board considers necessary.  A record must be kept of all bids, with names of bidders and amount of bids, and with the successful bid indicated thereon.  A bid containing an alteration or erasure of any price contained in the bid which is used in determining the lowest responsible bid must be rejected unless the alteration or erasure is corrected as provided in this section.  An alteration or erasure may be crossed out and the correction thereof printed in ink or typewritten adjacent thereto and initialed in ink by the person signing the bid.  In the case of identical low bids from two or more bidders, the board may, at its discretion, utilize negotiated procurement methods with the tied low bidders for that particular transaction, so long as the price paid does not exceed the low tied bid price.  In the case where only a single bid is received, the board may, at its discretion, negotiate a mutually agreeable contract with the bidder so long as the price paid does not exceed the original bid.  If no satisfactory bid is received, the board may readvertise.  Standard requirement price contracts established for supplies or services to be purchased by the district must be established by competitive bids.  Such standard requirement price contracts may contain escalation clauses and may provide for a negotiated price increase or decrease based upon a demonstrable industrywide or regional increase or decrease in the vendor's costs.  Either party to the contract may request that the other party demonstrate such increase or decrease.  The term of such contracts must not exceed two years with an option on the part of the district to renew for an additional two years, except as provided in subdivision 3 or 7.  Contracts for the purchase of perishable food items, except milk for school lunches and vocational training programs, in any amount may be made by direct negotiation by obtaining two or more written quotations for the purchase or sale, when possible, without advertising for bids or otherwise complying with the requirements of this section or section 471.345, subdivision 3.  All quotations obtained shall be kept on file for a period of at least one year after receipt.

 

Every contract made without compliance with the provisions of this section shall be void.  Except in the case of the destruction of buildings or injury thereto, where the public interest would suffer by delay, contracts for repairs may be made without advertising for bids.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective the day following final enactment.

 

Sec. 2.  Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 123B.52, subdivision 3, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 3.  Transportation; fuel.  Notwithstanding the provisions of subdivision 1 or section 471.345, a contract for the transportation of school children, or a contract for the purchase of petroleum heating fuel or fuel for vehicles may be made by direct negotiation, by obtaining two or more written quotations for the service when possible, or upon sealed bids.  At least 30 days before awarding a directly negotiated contract, the district must, by published notice, request quotations for the service to be provided.  All quotations obtained must be kept on file for a period of at least one year after receipt.  If a contract is made by direct negotiation, all quotations must be public information.  If a contract is made upon sealed bids, the procedure for advertising and awarding bids shall conform to the provisions of subdivision 1 except as otherwise provided in this subdivision.  The term of such contracts must not exceed ten years.


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Notwithstanding the provisions of subdivision 1 or section 574.26, a performance bond must be required of a contractor on a contract for the transportation of school children only when deemed necessary by and at the discretion of the board.  Such a performance bond must be in the amount determined by the board.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective the day following final enactment.

 

Sec. 3.  Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 126C.17, subdivision 9, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 9.  Referendum revenue.  (a) The revenue authorized by section 126C.10, subdivision 1, may be increased in the amount approved by the voters of the district at a referendum called for the purpose.  The referendum may be called by the board.  The referendum must be conducted one or two calendar years before the increased levy authority, if approved, first becomes payable.  Only one election to approve an increase may be held in a calendar year.  Unless the referendum is conducted by mail under subdivision 11, paragraph (a), the referendum must be held on the first Tuesday after the first Monday in November.  The ballot must state the maximum amount of the increased revenue per adjusted pupil unit.  The ballot may state a schedule, determined by the board, of increased revenue per adjusted pupil unit that differs from year to year over the number of years for which the increased revenue is authorized or may state that the amount shall increase annually by the rate of inflation.  For this purpose, the rate of inflation shall be the annual inflationary increase calculated under subdivision 2, paragraph (b).  The ballot may state that existing referendum levy authority is expiring.  In this case, the ballot may also compare the proposed levy authority to the existing expiring levy authority, and express the proposed increase as the amount, if any, over the expiring referendum levy authority.  The ballot must designate the specific number of years, not to exceed ten, for which the referendum authorization applies.  The ballot, including a ballot on the question to revoke or reduce the increased revenue amount under paragraph (c), must abbreviate the term "per adjusted pupil unit" as "per pupil."  The notice required under section 275.60 may be modified to read, in cases of renewing existing levies at the same amount per pupil as in the previous year:

 

"BY VOTING "YES" ON THIS BALLOT QUESTION, YOU ARE VOTING TO EXTEND AN EXISTING PROPERTY TAX REFERENDUM THAT IS SCHEDULED TO EXPIRE."

 

The ballot may contain a textual portion with the information required in this subdivision and a question stating substantially the following:

 

"Shall the increase in the revenue proposed by (petition to) the board of ......., School District No. .., be approved?"

 

If approved, an amount equal to the approved revenue per adjusted pupil unit times the adjusted pupil units for the school year beginning in the year after the levy is certified shall be authorized for certification for the number of years approved, if applicable, or until revoked or reduced by the voters of the district at a subsequent referendum.

 

(b) The board must deliver by mail at least 15 days but no more than 30 45 days before the day of the referendum to each taxpayer a notice of the referendum and the proposed revenue increase.  The board need not mail more than one notice to any taxpayer.  For the purpose of giving mailed notice under this subdivision, owners must be those shown to be owners on the records of the county auditor or, in any county where tax statements are mailed by the county treasurer, on the records of the county treasurer.  Every property owner whose name does not appear on the records of the county auditor or the county treasurer is deemed to have waived this mailed notice unless the owner has requested in writing that the county auditor or county treasurer, as the case may be, include the name on the records for this purpose.  The notice must project the anticipated amount of tax increase in annual dollars for typical residential homesteads, agricultural homesteads, apartments, and commercial-industrial property within the school district.

 

The notice for a referendum may state that an existing referendum levy is expiring and project the anticipated amount of increase over the existing referendum levy in the first year, if any, in annual dollars for typical residential homesteads, agricultural homesteads, apartments, and commercial-industrial property within the district.


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The notice must include the following statement:  "Passage of this referendum will result in an increase in your property taxes."  However, in cases of renewing existing levies, the notice may include the following statement:  "Passage of this referendum extends an existing operating referendum at the same amount per pupil as in the previous year."

 

(c) A referendum on the question of revoking or reducing the increased revenue amount authorized pursuant to paragraph (a) may be called by the board.  A referendum to revoke or reduce the revenue amount must state the amount per adjusted pupil unit by which the authority is to be reduced.  Revenue authority approved by the voters of the district pursuant to paragraph (a) must be available to the school district at least once before it is subject to a referendum on its revocation or reduction for subsequent years.  Only one revocation or reduction referendum may be held to revoke or reduce referendum revenue for any specific year and for years thereafter.

 

(d) The approval of 50 percent plus one of those voting on the question is required to pass a referendum authorized by this subdivision.

 

(e) At least 15 days before the day of the referendum, the district must submit a copy of the notice required under paragraph (b) to the commissioner and to the county auditor of each county in which the district is located.  Within 15 days after the results of the referendum have been certified by the board, or in the case of a recount, the certification of the results of the recount by the canvassing board, the district must notify the commissioner of the results of the referendum.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective July 1, 2020, and applies to referendum notices mailed on or after that date.

 

ARTICLE 2

EDUCATION EXCELLENCE

 

Section 1.  Minnesota Statutes 2019 Supplement, section 120B.12, subdivision 2, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 2.  Identification; report.  (a) Each school district must identify before the end of kindergarten, grade 1, and grade 2 all students who are not reading at grade level.  Students identified as not reading at grade level by the end of kindergarten, grade 1, and grade 2 must be screened, in a locally determined manner, for characteristics of dyslexia.

 

(b) Students in grade 3 or higher who demonstrate a reading difficulty to a classroom teacher must be screened, in a locally determined manner, for characteristics of dyslexia, unless a different reason for the reading difficulty has been identified.

 

(c) Reading assessments in English, and in the predominant languages of district students where practicable, must identify and evaluate students' areas of academic need related to literacy.  The district also must monitor the progress and provide reading instruction appropriate to the specific needs of English learners.  The district must use a locally adopted, developmentally appropriate, and culturally responsive assessment and annually report summary assessment results to the commissioner by July 1.

 

(d) The district also must annually report to the commissioner by July 1 a summary of the district's efforts to screen and identify students with:

 

(1) who demonstrate characteristics of dyslexia, using screening tools such as those recommended by the department's dyslexia specialist; or

 

(2) convergence insufficiency disorder. With respect to students screened or identified under paragraph (a), the report must include:


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(1) a summary of the district's efforts to screen for dyslexia;

 

(2) the number of students screened for that reporting year; and

 

(3) the number of students demonstrating characteristics of dyslexia for that year.

 

(e) A student identified under this subdivision must be provided with alternate instruction under section 125A.56, subdivision 1.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective for the 2020-2021 school year and later.

 

Sec. 2.  Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 122A.181, subdivision 3, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 3.  Term of license and renewal.  (a) The Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board must issue an initial Tier 1 license for a term of one year.  A Tier 1 license may be renewed subject to paragraphs (b) and (c).  The board may submit written comments to the district or charter school that requested the renewal regarding the candidate.

 

(b) The Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board must renew a Tier 1 license if:

 

(1) the district or charter school requesting the renewal demonstrates that it has posted the teacher position but was unable to hire an acceptable teacher with a Tier 2, 3, or 4 license for the position;

 

(2) the teacher holding the Tier 1 license took a content examination in accordance with section 122A.185 and submitted the examination results to the teacher's employing district or charter school within one year of the board approving the request for the initial Tier 1 license; and

 

(3) the teacher holding the Tier 1 license participated in cultural competency training consistent with section 120B.30, subdivision 1, paragraph (q), within one year of the board approving the request for the initial Tier 1 license.; and

 

(4) the teacher holding the Tier 1 license met the mental illness training renewal requirement under section 122A.187, subdivision 6.

 

The requirement in clause (2) does not apply to a teacher that teaches a class in a career and technical education or career pathways course of study.

 

(c) A Tier 1 license must not be renewed more than three times, unless the requesting district or charter school can show good cause for additional renewals.  A Tier 1 license issued to teach (1) a class or course in a career and technical education or career pathway course of study or (2) in a shortage area, as defined in section 122A.06, subdivision 6, may be renewed without limitation.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective for licenses issued on or after July 1, 2021.

 

Sec. 3.  Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 122A.182, subdivision 3, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 3.  Term of license and renewal.  The Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board must issue an initial Tier 2 license for a term of two years.  A Tier 2 license may be renewed three times.  Before a Tier 2 license is renewed for the first time, a teacher holding a Tier 2 license must participate in cultural competency training consistent with section 120B.30, subdivision 1, paragraph (q), and mental illness training under section 122A.187, subdivision 6.  The board must issue rules setting forth the conditions for additional renewals after the initial license has been renewed three times.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective for licenses issued on or after July 1, 2021.


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Sec. 4.  Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 122A.187, subdivision 6, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 6.  Mental illness.  The Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board must adopt rules that require all licensed teachers renewing a Tier 3 or Tier 4 teaching license under sections 122A.183 and 122A.181 to 122A.184, respectively, to include in the renewal requirements at least one hour of suicide prevention best practices training in each licensure renewal period based on nationally recognized evidence-based programs and practices, among the continuing education credits required to renew a license under this subdivision, and further preparation, first, in.  Initial training must include understanding the key warning signs of early-onset mental illness in children and adolescents, and then, during subsequent licensure renewal periods, preparation may training must include providing a more in-depth understanding of students' mental illness trauma, accommodations for students' mental illness, parents' roles in addressing students' mental illness, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders, autism, the requirements of section 125A.0942 governing restrictive procedures, and de-escalation methods, among other similar topics.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective the day following final enactment.

 

ARTICLE 3

HEALTH AND SAFETY

 

Section 1.  [120B.238] VAPING AWARENESS AND PREVENTION.

 

Subdivision 1.  Title.  This section may be referred to as the "Vaping Awareness and Prevention Act."

 

Subd. 2.  Definitions.  (a) For purposes of this section, the words defined in this subdivision have the meanings given them.

 

(b) "Electronic delivery device" has the meaning given in section 609.685, subdivision 1.

 

(c) "Heated tobacco product" means a tobacco product that produces aerosols containing nicotine and other chemicals which are inhaled by users through the mouth.

 

(d) "Public school" means a school district or a charter school.

 

(e) "Vaping" means using an activated electronic delivery device or heated tobacco product.

 

Subd. 3.  School instruction requirements.  (a) A public school must provide vaping prevention instruction at least once to students in grades 6 through 8.  A public school may use instructional materials based on the Department of Health's e-cigarette toolkit or may use other smoking prevention instructional materials with a focus on vaping and the use of electronic delivery devices and heated tobacco products.  The instruction may be provided as a part of a public school's locally developed health standards.

 

(b) A public school is strongly encouraged to provide evidence-based vaping prevention instruction to students in grades 9 through 12.

 

(c) A public school is encouraged to use a peer-to-peer education program to provide vaping prevention instruction.

 

Subd. 4.  Student survey.  The commissioner of education must include questions regarding tobacco use and vaping in the Minnesota student survey.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective for the 2021-2022 school year and later.


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Sec. 2.  Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 121A.22, subdivision 1, is amended to read:

 

Subdivision 1.  Applicability.  (a) This section applies only:

 

(1) when the parent of a pupil requests school personnel to administer drugs or medicine to the pupil; or

 

(2) when administration is allowed by the individualized education program of a child with a disability.

 

The request of a parent may be oral or in writing.  An oral request must be reduced to writing within two school days, provided that the district may rely on an oral request until a written request is received.

 

(b) If the administration of a drug or medication described in paragraph (a) requires a school to store the drug or medication, the parent or legal guardian must inform the school if the drug or medication is a controlled substance.  For a drug or medication that is not a controlled substance, the request must include a provision designating the school district as an authorized entity to transport the drug or medication for the purpose of destruction if any unused drug or medication remains in the possession of school personnel.  For a drug or medication that is a controlled substance, the request must specify that the parent or legal guardian is required to retrieve the drug or controlled substance when requested by the school.

 

Sec. 3.  Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 121A.22, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

 

Subd. 4a.  Unclaimed drugs or medications.  (a) Each school district must adopt a procedure for the collection and transport of any unclaimed or abandoned prescription drugs or medications remaining in the possession of school personnel in accordance with this subdivision.  The procedure must ensure that before the transportation of any prescription drug or medication under this subdivision, the school district shall make a reasonable attempt to return the unused prescription drug or medication to the student's parent or legal guardian.  The procedure must provide that transportation of unclaimed or unused prescription drugs or medications occur at least annually, or more frequently as determined by the school district.

 

(b) If the unclaimed or abandoned prescription drug is not a controlled substance as defined under section 152.01, subdivision 4, or is an over-the-counter medication, the school district may designate an individual who shall be responsible for transporting the drug or medication to a designated drop-off box or collection site or may request that a law enforcement agency transport the drug or medication to a drop-off box or collection site on behalf of the school district.

 

(c) If the unclaimed or abandoned prescription drug is a controlled substance as defined in section 152.01, subdivision 4, a school district or school personnel is prohibited from transporting the prescription drug to a drop-off box or collection site for prescription drugs identified under this paragraph.  The school district must request that a law enforcement agency transport the prescription drug or medication to a collection bin that complies with Drug Enforcement Agency regulations, or if a site is not available, under the agency's procedure for transporting drugs.

 

ARTICLE 4

SPECIAL EDUCATION

 

Section 1.  Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 125A.08, is amended to read:

 

125A.08 INDIVIDUALIZED EDUCATION PROGRAMS.

 

(a) At the beginning of each school year, each school district shall have in effect, for each child with a disability, an individualized education program.

 

(b) As defined in this section, every district must ensure the following:


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(1) all students with disabilities are provided the special instruction and services which are appropriate to their needs.  Where the individualized education program team has determined appropriate goals and objectives based on the student's needs, including the extent to which the student can be included in the least restrictive environment, and where there are essentially equivalent and effective instruction, related services, or assistive technology devices available to meet the student's needs, cost to the district may be among the factors considered by the team in choosing how to provide the appropriate services, instruction, or devices that are to be made part of the student's individualized education program.  The individualized education program team shall consider and may authorize services covered by medical assistance according to section 256B.0625, subdivision 26.  Before a school district evaluation team makes a determination of other health disability under Minnesota Rules, part 3525.1335, subparts 1 and 2, item A, subitem (1), the evaluation team must seek written documentation of the student's medically diagnosed chronic or acute health condition signed by a licensed physician or a licensed health care provider acting within the scope of the provider's practice.  The student's needs and the special education instruction and services to be provided must be agreed upon through the development of an individualized education program.  The program must address the student's need to develop skills to live and work as independently as possible within the community.  The individualized education program team must consider positive behavioral interventions, strategies, and supports that address behavior needs for children.  During grade 9, the program must address the student's needs for transition from secondary services to postsecondary education and training, employment, community participation, recreation, and leisure and home living.  In developing the program, districts must inform parents of the full range of transitional goals and related services that should be considered.  The program must include a statement of the needed transition services, including a statement of the interagency responsibilities or linkages or both before secondary services are concluded.  If the individualized education program meets the plan components in section 120B.125, the individualized education program satisfies the requirement and no additional transition plan is needed;

 

(2) children with a disability under age five and their families are provided special instruction and services appropriate to the child's level of functioning and needs;

 

(3) children with a disability and their parents or guardians are guaranteed procedural safeguards and the right to participate in decisions involving identification, assessment including assistive technology assessment, and educational placement of children with a disability;

 

(4) eligibility and needs of children with a disability are determined by an initial evaluation or reevaluation, which may be completed using existing data under United States Code, title 20, section 33, et seq.;

 

(5) to the maximum extent appropriate, children with a disability, including those in public or private institutions or other care facilities, are educated with children who are not disabled, and that special classes, separate schooling, or other removal of children with a disability from the regular educational environment occurs only when and to the extent that the nature or severity of the disability is such that education in regular classes with the use of supplementary services cannot be achieved satisfactorily;

 

(6) in accordance with recognized professional standards, testing and evaluation materials, and procedures used for the purposes of classification and placement of children with a disability are selected and administered so as not to be racially or culturally discriminatory; and

 

(7) the rights of the child are protected when the parents or guardians are not known or not available, or the child is a ward of the state.

 

(c) For all paraprofessionals employed to work in programs whose role in part is to provide direct support to students with disabilities, the school board in each district shall ensure that:

 

(1) before or beginning at the time of employment, each paraprofessional must develop sufficient knowledge and skills in emergency procedures, building orientation, roles and responsibilities, confidentiality, vulnerability, and reportability, among other things, to begin meeting the needs, especially disability-specific and behavioral needs, of the students with whom the paraprofessional works;


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(2) annual training opportunities are required to enable the paraprofessional to continue to further develop the knowledge and skills that are specific to the students with whom the paraprofessional works, including understanding disabilities, the unique and individual needs of each student according to the student's disability and how the disability affects the student's education and behavior, following lesson plans, and implementing follow-up instructional procedures and activities; and

 

(3) a districtwide process obligates each paraprofessional to work under the ongoing direction of a licensed teacher and, where appropriate and possible, the supervision of a school nurse.

 

(d) A school district may conduct a functional behavior assessment as defined in Minnesota Rules, part 3525.0210, subpart 22, as a stand-alone evaluation without conducting a comprehensive evaluation of the student in accordance with prior written notice provisions in section 125A.091, subdivision 3a.  A parent or guardian may request that a school district conduct a comprehensive evaluation of their student.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section applies to functional behavior assessments conducted on or after July 1, 2020.

 

Sec. 2.  Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 125A.50, subdivision 1, is amended to read:

 

Subdivision 1.  Commissioner approval.  The commissioner may approve applications from districts initiating or significantly changing a program to provide prevention services as an alternative to special education and other compensatory programs.  A district with an approved program may provide instruction and services in a regular education classroom, or an area learning center, to eligible pupils.  Pupils eligible to participate in the program are pupils who need additional academic or behavioral support to succeed in the general education environment and who may eventually qualify for special education instruction or related services under sections 125A.03 to 125A.24 and 125A.65 if the intervention services authorized by this section were unavailable.  A pupil with a disability as defined under sections 125A.03 to 125A.24 and 125A.65, whose individualized education program team has determined that the pupil does not require special education services in the area of the district's approved program, may participate in the approved program as long as participation does not result in an increase in costs for the program or displace a pupil who does not currently have a disability.  Pupils may be provided services during extended school days and throughout the entire year and through the assurance of mastery program under sections 125A.03 to 125A.24 and 125A.65.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective July 1, 2020.

 

ARTICLE 5

EARLY CHILDHOOD

 

Section 1.  Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 120A.20, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

 

Subd. 4.  Verification of age for admission to public school.  Public schools may request documentation that verifies a pupil falls within the school's minimum and maximum age requirements for admission to publicly funded prekindergarten, preschool, kindergarten, or grades 1 to 12.  Documentation may include a passport, a hospital birth record or physician's certificate, a baptismal or religious certificate, an adoption record, health records, immunization records, immigration records, previously verified school records, early childhood screening records, Minnesota Immunization Information Connection records, or an affidavit from a parent.

 

Sec. 2.  [121A.425] FULL AND EQUITABLE PARTICIPATION IN PRESCHOOL AND PREKINDERGARTEN.

 

Subdivision 1.  Disciplinary dismissals prohibited.  A pupil enrolled in a preschool or prekindergarten program, including a child participating in early childhood family education, school readiness, school readiness plus, voluntary prekindergarten, Head Start, or other school-based preschool or prekindergarten program may not be


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subject to dismissals under this chapter.  Notwithstanding the language in this subdivision, expulsions and exclusions may be used only after resources as outlined in subdivision 2 have been exhausted, and only in circumstances where there is an ongoing serious safety threat to the child or others.

 

Subd. 2.  Nonexclusionary discipline.  For purposes of this section, nonexclusionary discipline must include at least one of the following: 

 

(1) collaborating with the pupil's family or guardian, child mental health consultant or provider, education specialist, or other community-based support;

 

(2) creating a plan, written with the parent or guardian, that details the action and support needed for the pupil to fully participate in a preschool or prekindergarten program; or

 

(3) providing a referral for needed support services, including parenting education, home visits, other supportive education interventions, or, where appropriate, an evaluation to determine if the pupil is eligible for special education services or section 504 services.

 

Sec. 3.  Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 124D.165, subdivision 3, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 3.  Administration.  (a) The commissioner shall establish application timelines and determine the schedule for awarding scholarships that meets operational needs of eligible families and programs.  The commissioner must give highest priority to applications from children who:

 

(1) have a parent under age 21 who is pursuing a high school diploma or a course of study for a high school equivalency test;

 

(2) are in foster care or otherwise in need of protection or services; or

 

(3) have experienced homelessness in the last 24 months, as defined under the federal McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act, United States Code, title 42, section 11434a.

 

The commissioner may prioritize applications on additional factors including family income, geographic location, and whether the child's family is on a waiting list for a publicly funded program providing early education or child care services.

 

(b) The commissioner shall establish a target for the average scholarship amount per child based on the results of the rate survey conducted under section 119B.02.

 

(c) A four-star rated program that has children eligible for a scholarship enrolled in or on a waiting list for a program beginning in July, August, or September may notify the commissioner, in the form and manner prescribed by the commissioner, each year of the program's desire to enhance program services or to serve more children than current funding provides.  The commissioner may designate a predetermined number of scholarship slots for that program and notify the program of that number.  For fiscal year 2018 and later, the statewide amount of funding directly designated by the commissioner must not exceed the funding directly designated for fiscal year 2017.  Beginning July 1, 2016, a school district or Head Start program qualifying under this paragraph may use its established registration process to enroll scholarship recipients and may verify a scholarship recipient's family income in the same manner as for other program participants.

 

(d) A scholarship is awarded for a 12-month period.  If the scholarship recipient has not been accepted and subsequently enrolled in a rated program within ten months of the awarding of the scholarship, the scholarship cancels and the recipient must reapply in order to be eligible for another scholarship.  A child may not be awarded more than one scholarship in a 12-month period.


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(e) A child who receives a scholarship who has not completed development screening under sections 121A.16 to 121A.19 must complete that screening within 90 days of first attending an eligible program or within 90 days after the child's third birthday if awarded a scholarship under the age of three.

 

(f) For fiscal year 2017 and later, a school district or Head Start program enrolling scholarship recipients under paragraph (c) may apply to the commissioner, in the form and manner prescribed by the commissioner, for direct payment of state aid.  Upon receipt of the application, the commissioner must pay each program directly for each approved scholarship recipient enrolled under paragraph (c) according to the metered payment system or another schedule established by the commissioner.

 

Sec. 4.  Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 124D.165, subdivision 4, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 4.  Early childhood program eligibility.  (a) In order to be eligible to accept an early learning scholarship, a program must:

 

(1) participate in the quality rating and improvement system under section 124D.142; and

 

(2) beginning July 1, 2020 2024, have a three- or four-star rating in the quality rating and improvement system.

 

(b) Any program accepting scholarships must use the revenue to supplement and not supplant federal funding.

 

(c) Notwithstanding paragraph (a), all Minnesota early learning foundation scholarship program pilot sites are eligible to accept an early learning scholarship under this section.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective the day following final enactment.

 

Sec. 5.  Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 125A.30, is amended to read:

 

125A.30 INTERAGENCY EARLY INTERVENTION COMMITTEES.

 

(a) A group of school districts or special education cooperatives, in cooperation with the county and tribal health and human service agencies located in the county or counties in which the districts or cooperatives are located, must establish an Interagency Early Intervention Committee for children with disabilities under age five and their families under this section, and for children with disabilities ages three to 22 consistent with the requirements under sections 125A.023 and 125A.027.  Committees must include representatives of local health, education, and county human service agencies, early childhood family education programs, Head Start, parents of young children with disabilities under age 12, child care resource and referral agencies, school readiness programs, current service providers, and agencies that serve families experiencing homelessness, and may also include representatives from other private or public agencies and school nurses.  The committee must elect a chair from among its members and must meet at least quarterly.

 

(b) The committee must develop and implement interagency policies and procedures concerning the following ongoing duties:

 

(1) develop public awareness systems designed to inform potential recipient families, especially parents with premature infants, or infants with other physical risk factors associated with learning or development complications, of available programs and services;

 

(2) to reduce families' need for future services, and especially parents with premature infants, or infants with other physical risk factors associated with learning or development complications, implement interagency child find systems designed to actively seek out, identify, and refer infants and young children with, or at risk of, disabilities,


Journal of the House - 97th Day - Sunday, May 17, 2020 - Top of Page 8766

including a child under the age of three who:  (i) is the subject of a substantiated case of abuse or neglect or (ii) is identified as directly affected by illegal substance abuse, or withdrawal symptoms resulting from prenatal drug exposure;

 

(3) implement a process for assuring that services involve cooperating agencies at all steps leading to individualized programs;

 

(4) identify the current services and funding being provided within the community for children with disabilities under age five and their families; and

 

(5) develop a plan for the allocation and expenditure of federal early intervention funds under United States Code, title 20, section 1471 et seq.  (Part C, Public Law 108-446) and United States Code, title 20, section 631, et seq. (Chapter I, Public Law 89-313).

 

(c) The local committee shall also participate in needs assessments and program planning activities conducted by local social service, health and education agencies for young children with disabilities and their families."

 

Amend the title accordingly

 

 

Erickson moved to amend the Youakim amendment to H. F. No. 163, the first engrossment, as follows:

 

Page 8, after line 1, insert:

 

"Sec. 5.  Laws 2017, First Special Session chapter 5, article 2, section 52, is amended to read:

 

Sec. 52.  EDUCATION INNOVATION RESEARCH AND ACHIEVEMENT ZONES PILOT PROGRAM.

 

Subdivision 1.  Establishment; requirements for participation; research innovation zone plans.  (a) The innovation research zone pilot program is established to improve student and school outcomes consistent with the world's best workforce requirements under Minnesota Statutes, section 120B.11.  Innovation zone partnerships allow school districts and charter schools to research and implement innovative education programming models designed to better prepare students for the world of the 21st century.

 

(b) One or more school districts or charter schools may join together to form an innovation zone partnership.  The partnership may include other nonschool partners, including postsecondary institutions, other units of local government, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit organizations.  An innovation zone plan must be collaboratively developed in concert with the school's instructional staff.

 

(c) An innovation research zone partnership must research and may implement innovative education programs and models that are based on proposed hypotheses.  An innovation zone plan may include an emerging practice not yet supported by peer-reviewed research.  Examples of innovation zone research may include, but are not limited to:

 

(1) personalized learning, allowing students to excel at their own pace and according to their interests, aspirations, and unique needs;

 

(2) the use of competency outcomes rather than seat time and course completion to fulfill standards, credits, and other graduation requirements;

 

(3) multidisciplinary, real-world, inquiry-based, and student-directed models designed to make learning more engaging and relevant, including documenting and validating learning that takes place beyond the school day and school walls;


Journal of the House - 97th Day - Sunday, May 17, 2020 - Top of Page 8767

(4) models of instruction designed to close the achievement gap, including new models for age three to grade 3 models, English as a second language models, early identification and prevention of mental health issues, and others;

 

(5) new partnerships between secondary schools and postsecondary institutions, employers, or career training institutions enabling students to complete industry certifications, postsecondary education credits, and other credentials;

 

(6) new methods of collaborative leadership including the expansion of schools where teachers have larger professional roles;

 

(7) new ways to enhance parental and community involvement in learning;

 

(8) new models of professional development for educators, including embedded professional development; or

 

(9) new models in other areas such as whole child instruction, social-emotional skill development, technology‑based or blended learning, parent and community involvement, professional development and mentoring, and models that increase the return on investment.;

 

(10) new models of evaluation, assessment, and accountability using multiple indicators including models that demonstrate alternative ways to validate student's academic attainment that have predictive validity to the state tests, but also include other variables such as problem solving, creativity, analytical thinking, collaboration, respecting others, global understanding, postgraduation student performance, and other information;

 

(11) improving teacher and principal mentoring and evaluation;

 

(12) granting a high school diploma to a student who meets the graduation requirements under section 120B.02, subdivision 2, who demonstrates preparation for postsecondary education or a career consistent with the world's best workforce goals under section 120B.11, and who meets the following requirements:

 

(i) completes four years of high school; and

 

(ii) completes at least one year of postsecondary education at a two- or four-year college or university through concurrent enrollment, advanced placement, or international baccalaureate courses; or

 

(iii) completes the requirements for a career certification up to the apprenticeship program level if one is required for that certification;

 

(13) use of the provisions in section 124D.52, subdivision 9, governing standard adult high school diploma requirements; section 124D.085 governing experiential and applied learning opportunities; and section 126C.05, subdivision 15, paragraph (b), item (i), governing the use of independent study;

 

(14) use of the provisions of the learning year statute in section 124D.128 for a student in grade 10, 11, or 12 to participate in career and technical programs after school, on weekends, and during school breaks, including summers, and be included in the general education revenue computation.  The classes must generate both high school and postsecondary credit and lead to either a career certification, technical college degree, or an apprenticeship program.  A student participating in this learning year may attend school year round, and the student's continual learning plan must provide for the student to meet the high school graduation standards no later than the end of the fall semester of grade 12;

 

(15) methods to initiate prevention models to reduce student needs for special education and to reduce teacher time devoted to the required special education documentation; or


Journal of the House - 97th Day - Sunday, May 17, 2020 - Top of Page 8768

(16) other innovations as determined by the local boards.

 

(d) An innovation zone plan submitted to the commissioner must describe:

 

(1) how the plan will improve student and school outcomes consistent with the world's best workforce requirements under Minnesota Statutes, section 120B.11;

 

(2) the role of each partner in the zone;

 

(3) the research methodology used for each proposed action in the plan;

 

(4) (3) the exemptions from statutes and rules in subdivision 2 that the research innovation zone partnership will use;

 

(5) (4) a description of how teachers and other educational staff from the affected school sites will be included in the planning and implementation process;

 

(6) (5) a detailed description of expected outcomes and graduation standards;

 

(7) (6) a timeline for implementing the plan and assessing the outcomes; and

 

(8) (7) how results of the plan will be disseminated.

 

The governing board for each partner must approve the innovation zone plan.

 

(e) Upon unanimous approval of the initial innovation zone partners and approval of the commissioner of education, the innovation zone partnership may extend membership to other partners.  A new partner's membership is effective 30 days after the innovation zone partnership notifies the commissioner of the proposed change in membership unless the commissioner disapproves the new partner's membership and updates their plan.

 

(f) Notwithstanding any other law to the contrary, a school district or charter school participating in an innovation zone partnership under this section continues to receive all revenue and maintains its taxation authority in the same manner as before its participation in the innovation zone partnership.  The innovation zone school district and charter school partners remain organized and governed by their respective school boards with general powers under Minnesota Statutes, chapter 123B or 124E, and remain subject to any employment agreements under Minnesota Statutes, chapters 122A and 179A.  School district and charter school employees participating in an innovation zone partnership remain employees of their respective school district or charter school.

 

(g) An innovation zone partnership may submit its plan at any time to the commissioner in the form and manner specified by the commissioner.  The commissioner must approve or reject the plan after reviewing the recommendation of the Innovation Research Zone Advisory Panel.  An initial innovation zone plan that has been rejected by the commissioner may be resubmitted to the commissioner after the innovation zone partnership has modified the plan to meet each individually identified objection.

 

(h) An innovation zone plan must not cause an increase in state aid or levies for partners.

 

Subd. 2.  Exemptions from laws and rules.  (a) Notwithstanding any other law to the contrary, an innovation zone partner with an approved a plan filed with the commissioner is exempt from each of the following state education laws and rules specifically identified in its plan:

 

(1) any law or rule from which a district-created, site-governed school under Minnesota Statutes, section 123B.045, is exempt;


Journal of the House - 97th Day - Sunday, May 17, 2020 - Top of Page 8769

(2) any statute or rule from which the commissioner has exempted another district or charter school, as identified in the list published on the Department of Education's Web site under subdivision 4, paragraph (b);

 

(3) online learning program approval under Minnesota Statutes, section 124D.095, subdivision 7, if the school district or charter school offers a course or program online combined with direct access to a teacher for a portion of that course or program;

 

(4) restrictions on extended time revenue under Minnesota Statutes, section 126C.10, subdivision 2a, for a student who meets the criteria of Minnesota Statutes, section 124D.68, subdivision 2; and

 

(5) any required hours of instruction in any class or subject area for a student who is meeting all competencies consistent with the graduation standards described in the innovation zone plan.

 

(b) The exemptions under this subdivision must not be construed as exempting an innovation zone partner from the Minnesota Comprehensive Assessments or as increasing any state aid or levy.

 

Subd. 3.  Innovation Research Zone Advisory Panel.  (a) The commissioner must establish and convene an Innovation Research Zone Advisory Panel to review all innovation zone plans submitted for approval.

 

(b) The panel must be composed of nine members.  One member must be appointed by each of the following organizations:  Educators for Excellence, Education Minnesota, Minnesota Association of Secondary School Principals, Minnesota Elementary School Principals' Association, Minnesota Association of School Administrators, Minnesota School Boards Association, Minnesota Association of Charter Schools, and the Office of Higher Education.  The commissioner must appoint one member with expertise in evaluation and research.

 

Subd. 4.  Role of the commissioner approval.  (a) Upon recommendation of the Innovation Research Zone Advisory Panel, the commissioner may approve up to three innovation zone plans in the seven-county metropolitan area and up to three in greater Minnesota.  If an innovation zone partnership fails to implement its innovation zone plan as described in its application and according to the stated timeline, upon recommendation of the Innovation Research Zone Advisory Panel, the commissioner must may alert the partnership members and provide the opportunity to remediate.  If implementation continues to fail, the commissioner must may suspend or terminate the innovation zone plan.

 

(b) The commissioner must publish a list of the exemptions the commissioner has granted to a district or charter school on the Department of Education's Web site by July 1, 2017.  The list must be updated annually.

 

Subd. 5.  Project evaluation, dissemination, and report to legislature.  Each research innovation zone partnership must submit project data to the commissioner in the form and manner provided for in the approved application specified by the commissioner.  At least once every two years, the commissioner must may analyze each innovation zone's progress in realizing the objectives of the innovation zone partnership's plan.  The commissioner must To the extent practical, and using existing resources, the commissioner may summarize and categorize innovation zone plans and submit a report to the legislative committees having jurisdiction over education by February 1 of each odd-numbered year in accordance with Minnesota Statutes, section 3.195."

 

Amend the title accordingly

 

 

      A roll call was requested and properly seconded.


Journal of the House - 97th Day - Sunday, May 17, 2020 - Top of Page 8770

           The question was taken on the Erickson amendment to the Youakim amendment and the roll was called.  There were 58 yeas and 73 nays as follows:

 

      Those who voted in the affirmative were:

 


Albright

Anderson

Backer

Bahr

Baker

Bennett

Boe

Daniels

Daudt

Davids

Demuth

Dettmer

Drazkowski

Erickson

Fabian

Franson

Garofalo

Green

Gruenhagen

Gunther

Haley

Hamilton

Heinrich

Heintzeman

Hertaus

Johnson

Jurgens

Kiel

Koznick

Kresha

Layman

Lucero

Lueck

McDonald

Mekeland

Miller

Munson

Nash

Nelson, N.

Neu

Nornes

Novotny

O'Driscoll

O'Neill

Petersburg

Pierson

Poston

Quam

Robbins

Runbeck

Schomacker

Scott

Swedzinski

Theis

Torkelson

Urdahl

Vogel

West


 

      Those who voted in the negative were:

 


Acomb

Bahner

Becker-Finn

Bernardy

Bierman

Brand

Cantrell

Carlson, A.

Carlson, L.

Christensen

Claflin

Considine

Davnie

Dehn

Ecklund

Edelson

Elkins

Fischer

Freiberg

Gomez

Halverson

Hansen

Hassan

Hausman

Her

Hornstein

Howard

Huot

Jordan

Klevorn

Koegel

Kotyza-Witthuhn

Kunesh-Podein

Lee

Lesch

Liebling

Lien

Lillie

Lippert

Long

Mahoney

Mann

Mariani

Marquart

Masin

Moller

Moran

Morrison

Murphy

Nelson, M.

Noor

Olson

Pelowski

Persell

Pinto

Poppe

Pryor

Richardson

Sandell

Sandstede

Sauke

Schultz

Stephenson

Sundin

Tabke

Vang

Wagenius

Wazlawik

Winkler

Wolgamott

Xiong, J.

Xiong, T.

Youakim


 

 

      The motion did not prevail and the amendment to the amendment was not adopted.

 

 

Kresha moved to amend the Youakim amendment to H. F. No. 163, the first engrossment, as follows:

 

Page 8, after line 1, insert:

 

"Sec. 5.  IN-PERSON GRADUATION CEREMONIES.

 

Notwithstanding any law or executive order to the contrary, schools may conduct in-person graduation ceremonies, or hybrid in-person and online ceremonies, for the 2019-2020 school year if they are able to do so while adhering to Minnesota Department of Health guidelines on social distancing.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective the day following final enactment."

 

Amend the title accordingly

 

 

      A roll call was requested and properly seconded.

 

 

      Speaker pro tempore Olson called Halverson to the Chair.


Journal of the House - 97th Day - Sunday, May 17, 2020 - Top of Page 8771

           The question was taken on the Kresha amendment to the Youakim amendment and the roll was called.  There were 61 yeas and 69 nays as follows:

 

      Those who voted in the affirmative were:

 


Albright

Anderson

Backer

Bahr

Baker

Bennett

Boe

Daniels

Daudt

Davids

Demuth

Dettmer

Drazkowski

Erickson

Fabian

Franson

Garofalo

Green

Gruenhagen

Gunther

Haley

Hamilton

Heinrich

Heintzeman

Hertaus

Johnson

Jurgens

Kiel

Koznick

Kresha

Layman

Lucero

Lueck

Marquart

McDonald

Mekeland

Miller

Munson

Nash

Nelson, N.

Neu

Nornes

Novotny

O'Driscoll

O'Neill

Pelowski

Petersburg

Pierson

Poppe

Poston

Quam

Robbins

Runbeck

Schomacker

Scott

Swedzinski

Theis

Torkelson

Urdahl

Vogel

West


 

      Those who voted in the negative were:

 


Acomb

Bahner

Becker-Finn

Bernardy

Bierman

Brand

Cantrell

Carlson, A.

Carlson, L.

Christensen

Claflin

Considine

Davnie

Dehn

Ecklund

Edelson

Elkins

Fischer

Freiberg

Gomez

Halverson

Hansen

Hassan

Hausman

Her

Hornstein

Howard

Huot

Jordan

Klevorn

Koegel

Kotyza-Witthuhn

Kunesh-Podein

Lee

Lesch

Liebling

Lien

Lillie

Lippert

Long

Mahoney

Mann

Mariani

Masin

Moller

Moran

Morrison

Murphy

Nelson, M.

Noor

Olson

Persell

Pinto

Pryor

Richardson

Sandell

Sandstede

Sauke

Schultz

Stephenson

Sundin

Tabke

Vang

Wagenius

Wazlawik

Winkler

Xiong, J.

Xiong, T.

Youakim


 

 

      The motion did not prevail and the amendment to the amendment was not adopted.

 

 

Erickson moved to amend the Youakim amendment to H. F. No. 163, the first engrossment, as follows:

 

Page 6, line 26, reinstate the stricken language

 

Page 6, strike lines 27 and 28

 

Page 6, line 29, delete "; and" and strike the old language

 

Renumber the clauses in sequence

 

Page 7, line 14, strike everything after "in"

 

Page 7, line 15, strike "section 120B.30, subdivision 1, paragraph (q)" and delete ", and"

 

 

      A roll call was requested and properly seconded.


Journal of the House - 97th Day - Sunday, May 17, 2020 - Top of Page 8772

           The question was taken on the Erickson amendment to the Youakim amendment and the roll was called.  There were 58 yeas and 74 nays as follows:

 

      Those who voted in the affirmative were:

 


Albright

Anderson

Backer

Bahr

Baker

Bennett

Boe

Daniels

Daudt

Davids

Demuth

Dettmer

Drazkowski

Erickson

Fabian

Franson

Garofalo

Green

Gruenhagen

Gunther

Haley

Hamilton

Heinrich

Heintzeman

Hertaus

Johnson

Jurgens

Kiel

Koznick

Kresha

Layman

Lucero

Lueck

McDonald

Mekeland

Miller

Munson

Nash

Nelson, N.

Neu

Nornes

Novotny

O'Driscoll

O'Neill

Petersburg

Pierson

Poston

Quam

Robbins

Runbeck

Schomacker

Scott

Swedzinski

Theis

Torkelson

Urdahl

Vogel

West


 

      Those who voted in the negative were:

 


Acomb

Bahner

Becker-Finn

Bernardy

Bierman

Brand

Cantrell

Carlson, A.

Carlson, L.

Christensen

Claflin

Considine

Davnie

Dehn

Ecklund

Edelson

Elkins

Fischer

Freiberg

Gomez

Halverson

Hansen

Hassan

Hausman

Her

Hornstein

Howard

Huot

Jordan

Klevorn

Koegel

Kotyza-Witthuhn

Kunesh-Podein

Lee

Lesch

Liebling

Lien

Lillie

Lippert

Long

Mahoney

Mann

Mariani

Marquart

Masin

Moller

Moran

Morrison

Murphy

Nelson, M.

Noor

Olson

Pelowski

Persell

Pinto

Poppe

Pryor

Richardson

Sandell

Sandstede

Sauke

Schultz

Stephenson

Sundin

Tabke

Vang

Wagenius

Wazlawik

Winkler

Wolgamott

Xiong, J.

Xiong, T.

Youakim

Spk. Hortman


 

 

      The motion did not prevail and the amendment to the amendment was not adopted.

 

 

      Hortman was excused between the hours of 6:00 p.m. and 6:25 p.m.

 

 

Erickson moved to amend the Youakim amendment to H. F. No. 163, the first engrossment, as follows:

 

Page 8, after line 1, insert:

 

"Sec. 5.  ACADEMIC STANDARDS REVIEW SUSPENSION.

 

Notwithstanding Minnesota Statutes, section 120B.021, the commissioner of education must suspend any ongoing review or revision of academic standards, or implementation of revised academic standards under Minnesota Statutes, section 120B.021 until June 1, 2021.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective the day following final enactment."

 

Amend the title accordingly

 

 

      A roll call was requested and properly seconded.


Journal of the House - 97th Day - Sunday, May 17, 2020 - Top of Page 8773

           The question was taken on the Erickson amendment to the Youakim amendment and the roll was called.  There were 58 yeas and 73 nays as follows:

 

      Those who voted in the affirmative were:

 


Albright

Anderson

Backer

Bahr

Baker

Bennett

Boe

Daniels

Daudt

Davids

Demuth

Dettmer

Drazkowski

Erickson

Fabian

Franson

Garofalo

Green

Gruenhagen

Gunther

Haley

Hamilton

Heinrich

Heintzeman

Hertaus

Johnson

Jurgens

Kiel

Koznick

Kresha

Layman

Lucero

Lueck

McDonald

Mekeland

Miller

Munson

Nash

Nelson, N.

Neu

Nornes

Novotny

O'Driscoll

O'Neill

Petersburg

Pierson

Poston

Quam

Robbins

Runbeck

Schomacker

Scott

Swedzinski

Theis

Torkelson

Urdahl

Vogel

West


 

      Those who voted in the negative were:

 


Acomb

Bahner

Becker-Finn

Bernardy

Bierman

Brand

Cantrell

Carlson, A.

Carlson, L.

Christensen

Claflin

Considine

Davnie

Dehn

Ecklund

Edelson

Elkins

Fischer

Freiberg

Gomez

Halverson

Hansen

Hassan

Hausman

Her

Hornstein

Howard

Huot

Jordan

Klevorn

Koegel

Kotyza-Witthuhn

Kunesh-Podein

Lee

Lesch

Liebling

Lien

Lillie

Lippert

Long

Mahoney

Mann

Mariani

Marquart

Masin

Moller

Moran

Morrison

Murphy

Nelson, M.

Noor

Olson

Pelowski

Persell

Pinto

Poppe

Pryor

Richardson

Sandell

Sandstede

Sauke

Schultz

Stephenson

Sundin

Tabke

Vang

Wagenius

Wazlawik

Winkler

Wolgamott

Xiong, J.

Xiong, T.

Youakim


 

 

      The motion did not prevail and the amendment to the amendment was not adopted.

 

 

Jurgens moved to amend the Youakim amendment to H. F. No. 163, the first engrossment, as follows:

 

Page 8, after line 1, insert:

 

"Sec. 5.  Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 124D.111, is amended to read:

 

124D.111 SCHOOL MEAL POLICY; LUNCH AID; FOOD SERVICE ACCOUNTING.

 

Subdivision 1.  School lunch aid computation meal policy.  (a) Each Minnesota participant in the national school lunch program must adopt and post to its website, or the website of the organization where the meal is served, a school meal policy.  The policy must:

 

(1) be in writing, accessible in multiple languages, and clearly communicate student meal charges when payment cannot be collected at the point of service;

 

(2) be reasonable and well-defined and maintain the dignity of students by prohibiting lunch shaming or otherwise ostracizing any student;

 

(3) address whether the participant uses a collection agency to collect unpaid school meal debt;


Journal of the House - 97th Day - Sunday, May 17, 2020 - Top of Page 8774

(4) require any communication to collect unpaid school meal debt be done by school staff trained on the school district's policy on collecting student meal debt;

 

(5) require that all communication relating to school meal debt be delivered only to a student's parent or guardian and not directly to the student;

 

(6) ensure that once a participant has placed a meal on a tray or otherwise served the meal to a student, the meal may not be subsequently withdrawn from the student by the cashier or other school official because the student has outstanding meal debt;

 

(7) ensure that a student who has been determined eligible for free or reduced-price lunch must always be served a reimbursable meal even if the student has outstanding debt;

 

(8) provide the vendor with its school meal policy if the school contracts with a third party for its meal services; and

 

(9) require school nutrition staff be trained on the policy.

 

(b) Any contract between a school and a third-party provider of meal services entered into or modified on or after July 1, 2020, must ensure that the third-party provider adheres to the participant's school meal policy.

 

Subd. 1a.  School lunch aid amounts.  Each school year, the state must pay participants in the national school lunch program the amount of 12.5 cents for each full paid and free student lunch and 52.5 cents for each reduced-price lunch served to students.

 

Subd. 2.  Application.  A school district, charter school, nonpublic school, or other participant in the national school lunch program shall apply to the department for this payment on forms provided by the department.

 

Subd. 2a.  Federal child and adult care food program; criteria and notice.  The commissioner must post on the department's website eligibility criteria and application information for nonprofit organizations interested in applying to the commissioner for approval as a multisite sponsoring organization under the federal child and adult care food program.  The posted criteria and information must inform interested nonprofit organizations about:

 

(1) the criteria the commissioner uses to approve or disapprove an application, including how an applicant demonstrates financial viability for the Minnesota program, among other criteria;

 

(2) the commissioner's process and time line for notifying an applicant when its application is approved or disapproved and, if the application is disapproved, the explanation the commissioner provides to the applicant; and

 

(3) any appeal or other recourse available to a disapproved applicant.

 

Subd. 3.  School food service fund.  (a) The expenses described in this subdivision must be recorded as provided in this subdivision.

 

(b) In each district, the expenses for a school food service program for pupils must be attributed to a school food service fund.  Under a food service program, the school food service may prepare or serve milk, meals, or snacks in connection with school or community service activities.

 

(c) Revenues and expenditures for food service activities must be recorded in the food service fund.  The costs of processing applications, accounting for meals, preparing and serving food, providing kitchen custodial services, and other expenses involving the preparing of meals or the kitchen section of the lunchroom may be charged to the food service fund or to the general fund of the district.  The costs of lunchroom supervision, lunchroom custodial services, lunchroom utilities, and other administrative costs of the food service program must be charged to the general fund.


Journal of the House - 97th Day - Sunday, May 17, 2020 - Top of Page 8775

That portion of superintendent and fiscal manager costs that can be documented as attributable to the food service program may be charged to the food service fund provided that the school district does not employ or contract with a food service director or other individual who manages the food service program, or food service management company.  If the cost of the superintendent or fiscal manager is charged to the food service fund, the charge must be at a wage rate not to exceed the statewide average for food service directors as determined by the department.

 

(d) Capital expenditures for the purchase of food service equipment must be made from the general fund and not the food service fund, unless the restricted balance in the food service fund at the end of the last fiscal year is greater than the cost of the equipment to be purchased.

 

(e) If the condition set out in paragraph (d) applies, the equipment may be purchased from the food service fund.

 

(f) If a deficit in the food service fund exists at the end of a fiscal year, and the deficit is not eliminated by revenues from food service operations in the next fiscal year, then the deficit must be eliminated by a permanent fund transfer from the general fund at the end of that second fiscal year.  However, if a district contracts with a food service management company during the period in which the deficit has accrued, the deficit must be eliminated by a payment from the food service management company.

 

(g) Notwithstanding paragraph (f), a district may incur a deficit in the food service fund for up to three years without making the permanent transfer if the district submits to the commissioner by January 1 of the second fiscal year a plan for eliminating that deficit at the end of the third fiscal year.

 

(h) If a surplus in the food service fund exists at the end of a fiscal year for three successive years, a district may recode for that fiscal year the costs of lunchroom supervision, lunchroom custodial services, lunchroom utilities, and other administrative costs of the food service program charged to the general fund according to paragraph (c) and charge those costs to the food service fund in a total amount not to exceed the amount of surplus in the food service fund.

 

Subd. 4.  No fees.  A participant that receives school lunch aid under this section must make lunch available without charge and must not deny a school lunch to all participating students who qualify for free or reduced-price meals, whether or not that student has an outstanding balance in the student's meal account attributable to a la carte purchases or for any other reason. 

 

Subd. 5.  Respectful treatment.  (a) The participant must also provide meals to students in a respectful manner according to the policy adopted under subdivision 1.  The participant must ensure that any reminders for payment of outstanding student meal balances debt do not intentionally demean or, stigmatize, or humiliate any child participating in the school lunch program.  The participant must not impose any other restriction prohibited under section 123B.37 due to unpaid student meal debt.  The participant must not limit a student's participation in any school activities, graduation ceremonies, field trips, athletics, activity clubs, or other extracurricular activities or access to materials, technology, or other items provided to students due to an unpaid student meal debt.

 

(b) If the commissioner or the commissioner's designee determines a participant has violated the requirement to provide meals to participating students in a respectful manner, the commissioner or the commissioner's designee must send a letter of noncompliance to the participant.  The participant is required to respond and, if applicable, remedy the practice within 60 days.

 

Subd. 6.  Definitions.  (a) For the purposes of this section, the terms defined in this subdivision have the meanings given.

 

(b) "A la carte" means a food item ordered separately from the school meal.


Journal of the House - 97th Day - Sunday, May 17, 2020 - Top of Page 8776

(c) "School meal" means a meal provided to students during the school day.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective July 1, 2020."

 

Amend the title accordingly

 

 

      A roll call was requested and properly seconded.

 

 

      The Speaker resumed the Chair.

 

 

LAY ON THE TABLE

 

      Winkler moved that H. F. No. 163 be laid on the table. 

 

 

      A roll call was requested and properly seconded.

 

 

POINT OF ORDER

 

      Daudt raised a point of order pursuant to rule 3.12, relating to Motion to Lay on the Table, that the Winkler motion was not in order.  The Speaker ruled the point of order not well taken and the Winkler motion in order.

 

 

      The question recurred on the Winkler motion and the roll was called.  There were 74 yeas and 59 nays as follows:

 

      Those who voted in the affirmative were:

 


Acomb

Bahner

Becker-Finn

Bernardy

Bierman

Brand

Cantrell

Carlson, A.

Carlson, L.

Christensen

Claflin

Considine

Davnie

Dehn

Ecklund

Edelson

Elkins

Fischer

Freiberg

Gomez

Halverson

Hansen

Hassan

Hausman

Her

Hornstein

Howard

Huot

Jordan

Klevorn

Koegel

Kotyza-Witthuhn

Kunesh-Podein

Lee

Lesch

Liebling

Lien

Lillie

Lippert

Long

Mahoney

Mann

Mariani

Marquart

Masin

Moller

Moran

Morrison

Murphy

Nelson, M.

Noor

Olson

Pelowski

Persell

Pinto

Poppe

Pryor

Richardson

Sandell

Sandstede

Sauke

Schultz

Stephenson

Sundin

Tabke

Vang

Wagenius

Wazlawik

Winkler

Wolgamott

Xiong, J.

Xiong, T.

Youakim

Spk. Hortman


 

      Those who voted in the negative were:

 


Albright

Anderson

Backer

Bahr

Baker

Bennett

Boe

Daniels

Daudt

Davids

Demuth

Dettmer

Drazkowski

Erickson

Fabian

Franson

Garofalo

Green

Grossell

Gruenhagen

Gunther

Haley

Hamilton

Heinrich

Heintzeman

Hertaus

Johnson

Jurgens

Kiel

Koznick

Kresha

Layman

Lucero

Lueck

McDonald

Mekeland


Journal of the House - 97th Day - Sunday, May 17, 2020 - Top of Page 8777

Miller

Munson

Nash

Nelson, N.

Neu

Nornes

Novotny

O'Driscoll

O'Neill

Petersburg

Pierson

Poston

Quam

Robbins

Runbeck

Schomacker

Scott

Swedzinski

Theis

Torkelson

Urdahl

Vogel

West


 

 

      The motion prevailed and H. F. No. 163 was laid on the table.

 

 

      Winkler moved that the House recess subject to the call of the Chair.  The motion prevailed.

 

 

RECESS

 

 

RECONVENED

 

      The House reconvened and was called to order by the Speaker.

 

 

      There being no objection, the order of business reverted to Messages from the Senate.

 

 

MESSAGES FROM THE SENATE

 

 

      The following messages were received from the Senate:

 

 

Madam Speaker:

 

I hereby announce the passage by the Senate of the following House File, herewith returned: 

 

H. F. No. 2682, A bill for an act relating to legacy; appropriating money from outdoor heritage fund; appropriating money for Medal of Honor memorial; extending and modifying previous appropriations from legacy funds; amending Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 97A.056, subdivision 5; Laws 2017, chapter 91, article 1, section 2, subdivision 3; article 4, section 2, subdivision 2; Laws 2019, First Special Session chapter 2, article 1, section 2, subdivision 5; article 4, section 2, subdivisions 2, 8; Laws 2019, First Special Session chapter 10, article 1, section 24, subdivision 2.

 

Cal R. Ludeman, Secretary of the Senate

 

 

Madam Speaker:

 

I hereby announce the passage by the Senate of the following House File, herewith returned: 

 

H. F. No. 3230, A bill for an act relating to energy; amending the current electric utility program that encourages efficient lighting to include promotion of LEDs; amending Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 216B.241, subdivision 5.

 

Cal R. Ludeman, Secretary of the Senate


Journal of the House - 97th Day - Sunday, May 17, 2020 - Top of Page 8778

Madam Speaker:

 

I hereby announce the passage by the Senate of the following House File, herewith returned: 

 

H. F. No. 4597, A bill for an act relating to horse racing; modifying certain revenue and reimbursement provisions; granting certain discretion to the commission for operation of a card club; amending Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 240.30, subdivisions 5, 9; Minnesota Statutes 2019 Supplement, sections 240.13, subdivision 5; 240.131, subdivision 7.

 

Cal R. Ludeman, Secretary of the Senate

 

 

Madam Speaker:

 

I hereby announce the passage by the Senate of the following House File, herewith returned: 

 

H. F. No. 4602, A bill for an act relating to economic development; modifying conditions for forgiveness of a loan from the Minnesota investment fund; amending Laws 2019, First Special Session chapter 7, article 1, section 2, subdivision 2, as amended.

 

Cal R. Ludeman, Secretary of the Senate

 

 

Madam Speaker:

 

I hereby announce the passage by the Senate of the following House File, herewith returned, as amended by the Senate, in which amendments the concurrence of the House is respectfully requested:

 

H. F. No. 4601, A bill for an act relating to human services; requiring the commissioner of human services to award grants from the opiate epidemic response account.

 

Cal R. Ludeman, Secretary of the Senate

 

 

CONCURRENCE AND REPASSAGE

 

      Koegel moved that the House concur in the Senate amendments to H. F. No. 4601 and that the bill be repassed as amended by the Senate.  The motion prevailed.

 

 

H. F. No. 4601, A bill for an act relating to human services; requiring the commissioner of human services to award grants from the opiate epidemic response account.

 

 

      The bill was read for the third time, as amended by the Senate, and placed upon its repassage.


Journal of the House - 97th Day - Sunday, May 17, 2020 - Top of Page 8779

           The question was taken on the repassage of the bill and the roll was called.  There were 123 yeas and 5 nays as follows:

 

      Those who voted in the affirmative were:

 


Acomb

Albright

Anderson

Backer

Bahner

Baker

Becker-Finn

Bennett

Bernardy

Bierman

Boe

Brand

Cantrell

Carlson, A.

Carlson, L.

Christensen

Claflin

Considine

Daniels

Daudt

Davids

Davnie

Dehn

Demuth

Dettmer

Ecklund

Edelson

Elkins

Erickson

Fabian

Fischer

Franson

Freiberg

Gomez

Green

Grossell

Gruenhagen

Gunther

Haley

Halverson

Hansen

Hassan

Hausman

Heinrich

Heintzeman

Her

Hertaus

Hornstein

Howard

Huot

Johnson

Jordan

Jurgens

Kiel

Klevorn

Koegel

Kotyza-Witthuhn

Koznick

Kresha

Kunesh-Podein

Layman

Lee

Lesch

Liebling

Lien

Lillie

Lippert

Long

Lueck

Mahoney

Mann

Mariani

Marquart

Masin

McDonald

Mekeland

Moller

Moran

Morrison

Murphy

Nash

Nelson, M.

Nelson, N.

Neu

Noor

Nornes

Novotny

O'Driscoll

Olson

Pelowski

Persell

Petersburg

Pierson

Pinto

Poppe

Poston

Pryor

Quam

Robbins

Sandell

Sandstede

Sauke

Schomacker

Schultz

Scott

Stephenson

Sundin

Swedzinski

Tabke

Theis

Torkelson

Urdahl

Vang

Vogel

Wagenius

Wazlawik

West

Winkler

Wolgamott

Xiong, J.

Xiong, T.

Youakim

Spk. Hortman


 

      Those who voted in the negative were:

 


Bahr

Drazkowski

Lucero

Munson

O'Neill


 

 

      The bill was repassed, as amended by the Senate, and its title agreed to.

 

 

CALENDAR FOR THE DAY

 

 

      S. F. No. 3204, A bill for an act relating to health care coverage; modifying requirements governing utilization review and prior authorization of health care services; making conforming changes; requiring a report; amending Minnesota Statutes 2018, sections 62M.01, subdivisions 2, 3; 62M.02, subdivisions 2, 5, 8, 20, 21, by adding subdivisions; 62M.04, subdivisions 1, 2, 3, 4; 62M.05, subdivisions 3, 3a, 3b, 4, 5; 62M.06, subdivisions 1, 2, 3, 4; 62M.07; 62M.09, subdivisions 3, 3a, 4, 4a, 5; 62M.10, subdivision 7, by adding a subdivision; 62M.11; 62M.12; 62Q.71; 62Q.73, subdivision 1; 256B.692, subdivision 2; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 62M; repealing Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 62M.02, subdivision 19; Minnesota Rules, part 4685.0100, subpart 9b.

 

 

      The bill was read for the third time and placed upon its final passage.


Journal of the House - 97th Day - Sunday, May 17, 2020 - Top of Page 8780

           The question was taken on the passage of the bill and the roll was called.  There were 128 yeas and 2 nays as follows:

 

      Those who voted in the affirmative were:

 


Acomb

Albright

Anderson

Backer

Bahner

Baker

Becker-Finn

Bennett

Bernardy

Bierman

Boe

Brand

Cantrell

Carlson, A.

Carlson, L.

Christensen

Claflin

Considine

Daniels

Daudt

Davids

Davnie

Dehn

Demuth

Dettmer

Drazkowski

Ecklund

Edelson

Elkins

Erickson

Fabian

Fischer

Franson

Freiberg

Garofalo

Gomez

Green

Grossell

Gruenhagen

Gunther

Haley

Halverson

Hamilton

Hansen

Hassan

Hausman

Heinrich

Heintzeman

Her

Hertaus

Hornstein

Howard

Huot

Johnson

Jordan

Jurgens

Kiel

Klevorn

Koegel

Kotyza-Witthuhn

Koznick

Kresha

Kunesh-Podein

Layman

Lee

Lesch

Liebling

Lien

Lillie

Lippert

Long

Lucero

Lueck

Mahoney

Mann

Mariani

Marquart

Masin

McDonald

Mekeland

Miller

Moller

Moran

Morrison

Murphy

Nash

Nelson, M.

Nelson, N.

Neu

Noor

Nornes

Novotny

O'Driscoll

Olson

O'Neill

Pelowski

Persell

Petersburg

Pierson

Pinto

Poppe

Poston

Pryor

Quam

Richardson

Robbins

Runbeck

Sandstede

Sauke

Schultz

Scott

Stephenson

Sundin

Swedzinski

Tabke

Theis

Torkelson

Vang

Vogel

Wagenius

Wazlawik

West

Winkler

Wolgamott

Xiong, J.

Xiong, T.

Youakim

Spk. Hortman


 

      Those who voted in the negative were:

 


Bahr

Munson


 

 

      The bill was passed and its title agreed to.

 

 

MOTIONS FOR RECONSIDERATION

 

      Winkler moved that the vote whereby S. F. No. 3204 was passed be now reconsidered.  The motion prevailed.

 

 

      Winkler moved that the action whereby S. F. No. 3204 was given its third reading be now reconsidered.  The motion prevailed.

 

 

      S. F. No. 3204 was again reported to the House.

 

 

Bahr moved to amend S. F. No. 3204, the third engrossment, as follows:

 

Page 2, delete section 2

 

Renumber the sections in sequence and correct the internal references

 

Amend the title accordingly

 

 

      The motion did not prevail and the amendment was not adopted.


Journal of the House - 97th Day - Sunday, May 17, 2020 - Top of Page 8781

           S. F. No. 3204, A bill for an act relating to health care coverage; modifying requirements governing utilization review and prior authorization of health care services; making conforming changes; requiring a report; amending Minnesota Statutes 2018, sections 62M.01, subdivisions 2, 3; 62M.02, subdivisions 2, 5, 8, 20, 21, by adding subdivisions; 62M.04, subdivisions 1, 2, 3, 4; 62M.05, subdivisions 3, 3a, 3b, 4, 5; 62M.06, subdivisions 1, 2, 3, 4; 62M.07; 62M.09, subdivisions 3, 3a, 4, 4a, 5; 62M.10, subdivision 7, by adding a subdivision; 62M.11; 62M.12; 62Q.71; 62Q.73, subdivision 1; 256B.692, subdivision 2; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapter 62M; repealing Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 62M.02, subdivision 19; Minnesota Rules, part 4685.0100, subpart 9b.

 

 

      The bill was read for the third time and placed upon its final passage.

 

      The question was taken on the passage of the bill and the roll was called.  There were 123 yeas and 9 nays as follows:

 

      Those who voted in the affirmative were:

 


Acomb

Albright

Anderson

Backer

Bahner

Baker

Becker-Finn

Bennett

Bernardy

Bierman

Brand

Cantrell

Carlson, A.

Carlson, L.

Christensen

Claflin

Considine

Daniels

Daudt

Davids

Davnie

Dehn

Demuth

Dettmer

Ecklund

Edelson

Elkins

Fabian

Fischer

Franson

Freiberg

Garofalo

Gomez

Green

Grossell

Gruenhagen

Gunther

Haley

Halverson

Hamilton

Hansen

Hassan

Hausman

Heinrich

Heintzeman

Her

Hornstein

Howard

Huot

Johnson

Jordan

Jurgens

Kiel

Klevorn

Koegel

Kotyza-Witthuhn

Koznick

Kresha

Kunesh-Podein

Layman

Lee

Lesch

Liebling

Lien

Lillie

Lippert

Long

Lueck

Mahoney

Mann

Mariani

Marquart

Masin

McDonald

Moller

Moran

Morrison

Murphy

Nash

Nelson, M.

Nelson, N.

Neu

Noor

Nornes

Novotny

O'Driscoll

Olson

O'Neill

Pelowski

Persell

Petersburg

Pierson

Pinto

Poppe

Poston

Pryor

Quam

Richardson

Robbins

Runbeck

Sandell

Sandstede

Sauke

Schultz

Scott

Stephenson

Sundin

Swedzinski

Tabke

Theis

Torkelson

Urdahl

Vang

Vogel

Wagenius

Wazlawik

West

Winkler

Wolgamott

Xiong, J.

Xiong, T.

Youakim

Spk. Hortman


 

      Those who voted in the negative were:

 


Bahr

Boe

Drazkowski

Erickson

Hertaus

Lucero

Mekeland

Miller

Munson


 

 

      The bill was passed and its title agreed to.

 

 

MOTIONS AND RESOLUTIONS

 

 

SUSPENSION OF RULES

 

      Winkler moved that the rules of the House be so far suspended so that S. F. No. 13 be recalled from the Committee on Health and Human Services Policy, be given its second and third readings and be placed upon its final passage.  The motion prevailed.


Journal of the House - 97th Day - Sunday, May 17, 2020 - Top of Page 8782

           Pursuant to Article IV, Section 19, of the Constitution of the state of Minnesota, Winkler moved that the rule therein be suspended and an urgency be declared so that S. F. No. 13 be given its second and third readings and be placed upon its final passage.

 

 

      The question was taken on the Winkler motion and the roll was called.  There were 124 yeas and 7 nays as follows:

 

      Those who voted in the affirmative were:

 


Acomb

Albright

Anderson

Backer

Bahner

Baker

Becker-Finn

Bennett

Bernardy

Bierman

Boe

Brand

Cantrell

Carlson, A.

Carlson, L.

Christensen

Claflin

Considine

Daniels

Daudt

Davids

Davnie

Dehn

Demuth

Dettmer

Ecklund

Edelson

Elkins

Erickson

Fabian

Fischer

Franson

Freiberg

Garofalo

Gomez

Green

Grossell

Gunther

Haley

Halverson

Hamilton

Hansen

Hassan

Hausman

Heinrich

Heintzeman

Her

Hertaus

Hornstein

Howard

Huot

Johnson

Jordan

Jurgens

Kiel

Klevorn

Koegel

Kotyza-Witthuhn

Koznick

Kresha

Kunesh-Podein

Layman

Lee

Lesch

Liebling

Lien

Lillie

Lippert

Long

Lueck

Mahoney

Mann

Mariani

Marquart

Masin

McDonald

Moller

Moran

Morrison

Murphy

Nash

Nelson, M.

Nelson, N.

Neu

Noor

Nornes

Novotny

O'Driscoll

Olson

O'Neill

Pelowski

Persell

Petersburg

Pierson

Pinto

Poppe

Poston

Pryor

Quam

Richardson

Robbins

Runbeck

Sandell

Sandstede

Sauke

Schomacker

Schultz

Scott

Stephenson

Sundin

Swedzinski

Tabke

Theis

Torkelson

Urdahl

Vang

Vogel

Wazlawik

West

Winkler

Xiong, J.

Xiong, T.

Youakim

Spk. Hortman


 

      Those who voted in the negative were:

 


Bahr

Drazkowski

Gruenhagen

Lucero

Mekeland

Miller

Munson


 

 

      The motion prevailed.

 

 

      S. F. No. 13 was read for the second time.

 

 

Moran moved to amend S. F. No. 13, the second engrossment, as follows:

 

Delete everything after the enacting clause and insert:

 

"ARTICLE 1

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

 

Section 1.  Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 144.121, subdivision 1, is amended to read:

 

Subdivision 1.  Registration; fees.  The fee for the registration for x-ray machines equipment and other sources of ionizing radiation required to be registered under rules adopted by the state commissioner of health pursuant to section 144.12, shall be in an amount as described in subdivision 1a pursuant to section 144.122.  The registration shall expire and be renewed as prescribed by the commissioner pursuant to section 144.122.


Journal of the House - 97th Day - Sunday, May 17, 2020 - Top of Page 8783

Sec. 2.  Minnesota Statutes 2019 Supplement, section 144.121, subdivision 1a, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 1a.  Fees for ionizing radiation-producing equipment.  (a) A facility with ionizing radiation-producing equipment and other sources of ionizing radiation must pay an annual initial or annual renewal registration fee consisting of a base facility fee of $100 and an additional fee for each radiation source x-ray tube, as follows:

 

(1)

medical or veterinary equipment

 

$100

 

(2)

dental x-ray equipment

 

$40

 

(3)

x-ray equipment not used on humans or animals

 

$100

 

(4)

devices with sources of ionizing radiation not used on humans or animals

 

$100

 

(5)

security screening system

 

$100

 

 

(b) A facility with radiation therapy and accelerator equipment must pay an initial or annual registration fee of $500.  A facility with an industrial accelerator must pay an initial or annual registration fee of $150.

 

(c) Electron microscopy equipment is exempt from the registration fee requirements of this section.

 

(d) For purposes of this section, a security screening system means ionizing radiation-producing equipment designed and used for security screening of humans who are in the custody of a correctional or detention facility, and used by the facility to image and identify contraband items concealed within or on all sides of a human body.  For purposes of this section, a correctional or detention facility is a facility licensed under section 241.021 and operated by a state agency or political subdivision charged with detection, enforcement, or incarceration in respect to state criminal and traffic laws.

 

Sec. 3.  Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 144.121, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

 

Subd. 1d.  Handheld dental x-ray equipment.  A facility that uses handheld dental x-ray equipment according to section 144.1215 must comply with this section.

 

Sec. 4.  Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 144.121, subdivision 2, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 2.  Inspections.  Periodic radiation safety inspections of the x-ray equipment and other sources of ionizing radiation shall be made by the state commissioner of health.  The frequency of safety inspections shall be prescribed by the commissioner on the basis of the frequency of use of the x-ray equipment and other source of ionizing radiation;, provided that each source shall be inspected at least once every four years.

 

Sec. 5.  Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 144.121, subdivision 5, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 5.  Examination for individual operating x-ray equipment systems.  (a) After January 1, 2008, An individual in a facility with x-ray equipment systems for use on living humans that is registered under subdivision 1 may not operate, nor may the facility allow the individual to operate, x-ray equipment systems unless the individual has passed a national or state examination for limited x-ray machine operators that meets the requirements of paragraphs (b) and (c) and is approved by the commissioner of health.

 

(b) The commissioner shall establish criteria for the approval of examinations based on national standards, such as the examination in radiography from the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists, the examination for limited scope of practice in radiography from the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists for limited x-ray machine operators, and the American Registry of Chiropractic Radiography Technologists for limited radiography in spines and extremities; or equivalent examinations approved by other states.  Equivalent examinations may be


Journal of the House - 97th Day - Sunday, May 17, 2020 - Top of Page 8784

approved by the commissioner, if the examination is consistent with the standards for educational and psychological testing as recommended by the American Education Research Association, the American Psychological Association, the National Council on Measurement in Education, or the National Commission for Certifying Agencies.  The organization proposing the use of an equivalent examination shall submit a fee to the commissioner of $1,000 per examination to cover the cost of determining the extent to which the examination meets the examining standards.  The collected fee shall be deposited in the state treasury and credited to the state government special revenue fund.

 

(b) Individuals who may operate x-ray systems include:

 

(1) an individual who has passed the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) registry for radiography examination;

 

(2) an individual who has passed the American Chiropractic Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ACRRT) registry examination and is limited to radiography of spines and extremities;

 

(3) a registered limited scope x-ray operator and a registered bone densitometry equipment operator who passed the examination requirements in paragraphs (d) and (e) and practices according to subdivision 5a;

 

(4) an x-ray operator who has the original certificate or the original letter of passing the examination that was required before January 1, 2008, under Minnesota Statutes 2008, section 144.121, subdivision 5a, paragraph (b), clause (1);

 

(5) an individual who has passed the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) registry for radiation therapy examination according to subdivision 5e;

 

(6) a cardiovascular technologist according to subdivision 5c;

 

(7) a nuclear medicine technologist according to subdivision 5d;

 

(8) an individual who has passed the examination for a dental hygienist under section 150A.06 and only operates dental x-ray systems;

 

(9) an individual who has passed the examination for a dental therapist under section 150A.06 and only operates dental x-ray systems;

 

(10) an individual who has passed the examination for a dental assistant under section 150A.06, and only operates dental x-ray systems;

 

(11) an individual who has passed the examination under Minnesota Rules, part 3100.8500, subpart 3, and only operates dental x-ray systems; and

 

(12) a qualified practitioner who is licensed by a health-related licensing board with active practice authority and is working within the practitioner's scope of practice.

 

(c) Except for individuals under clauses (3) and (4), an individual who is participating in a training or educational program in any of the occupations listed in paragraph (b) is exempt from the examination requirement within the scope and for the duration of the training or educational program.

 

(c) (d) The Minnesota examination for limited scope x-ray machine operators must include:

 

(1) radiation protection, radiation physics and radiobiology, equipment maintenance and operation and quality assurance, image production acquisition and technical evaluation, and patient care interactions and management; and


Journal of the House - 97th Day - Sunday, May 17, 2020 - Top of Page 8785

(2) at least one of the following regions of the human anatomy:  chest, extremities, skull and sinus, spine, or ankle and foot podiatry.  The examinations must include the anatomy of, and positioning radiographic positions and projections for, the specific regions.

 

(e) The examination for bone densitometry equipment operators must include:

 

(1) osteoporosis, bone physiology, bone health and patient education, patient preparation, fundamental principals, biological effects of radiation, units of measurements, radiation protection in bone densitometry, fundamentals of x-ray production, quality control, measuring bone mineral testing, determining quality in bone mineral testing, file and database management; and

 

(2) dual x-ray absorptiometry scanning of the lumbar spine, proximal femur, and forearm.  The examination must include the anatomy, scan acquisition, and scan analysis for these three procedures.

 

(d) (f) A limited scope x-ray operator, and a bone densitometry equipment operator, who is are required to take an examination under this subdivision must submit to the commissioner an a registration application for the examination, and a $25 processing fee, and the required examination fee set by the national organization offering the examination.  The processing fee and the examination fee shall be deposited in the state treasury and credited to the state government special revenue fund.  The commissioner shall submit the fee to the national organization providing the examination.

 

Sec. 6.  Minnesota Statutes 2019 Supplement, section 144.121, subdivision 5a, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 5a.  Limited scope x-ray machine and bone densitometry equipment operator practice.  (a) A registered limited scope x-ray operator and a registered bone densitometry equipment operator may only practice medical radiography on limited regions of the human anatomy for which the operator has successfully passed an examination identified in subdivision 5, unless the operator meets one of the exemptions described in paragraph (b).  The operator may practice using only routine radiographic procedures, for the interpretation by and under the direction of a qualified practitioner, excluding paragraphs (d) and (e) and may not operate computed tomography, cone beam computed tomography, the use of contrast media, and the use of fluoroscopic or mammographic equipment x-ray systems.

 

(b) This subdivision does not apply to:

 

(1) limited x-ray machine operators who passed the examination that was required before January 1, 2008;

 

(2) certified radiologic technologists, licensed dental hygienists, registered dental assistants, certified registered nurse anesthetists, and registered physician assistants;

 

(3) individuals who are licensed in Minnesota to practice medicine, osteopathic medicine, chiropractic, podiatry, or dentistry;

 

(4) individuals who are participating in a training course in any of the occupations listed in clause (2), (3), or (5) for the duration and within the scope of the training course; and

 

(5) cardiovascular technologists who assist with the operation of fluoroscopy equipment if they:

 

(i) are credentialed by Cardiovascular Credentialing International as a registered cardiovascular invasive specialist or as a registered cardiac electrophysiology specialist, are a graduate of an education program accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs, which uses the standards and criteria established by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Cardiovascular Technology, or are designated on a variance granted by the commissioner, effective July 31, 2019; and


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(ii) are under the personal supervision and in the physical presence of a qualified practitioner for diagnosing or treating a disease or condition of the cardiovascular system in fluoroscopically guided interventional procedures.  Cardiovascular technologists may not activate the fluoroscopic system or evaluate quality control tests.

 

Sec. 7.  Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 144.121, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

 

Subd. 5c.  Cardiovascular technologist practice.  (a) Cardiovascular technologists may assist with the operation of fluoroscopy equipment if they:

 

(1) are credentialed by Cardiovascular Credentialing International as a registered cardiovascular invasive specialist or as a registered cardiac electrophysiology specialist, are a graduate of an educational program accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs, which uses the standards and criteria established by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Cardiovascular Technology, or are designated on a variance granted by the commissioner effective July 31, 2019; and

 

(2) are under the personal supervision and in the physical presence of a qualified practitioner for diagnosing or treating a disease or condition of the cardiovascular system in fluoroscopically guided interventional procedures.  Cardiovascular technologists may not activate the fluoroscopic system or evaluate quality control tests.

 

(b) A cardiovascular technologist who is participating in a training or educational program in any of the occupations listed in this subdivision is exempt from the examination requirement within the scope and for the duration of the training or educational program.

 

Sec. 8.  Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 144.121, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

 

Subd. 5d.  Nuclear medicine technologist practice.  (a) Nuclear medicine technologists who have passed the primary pathway credential in Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board (NMTCB) for nuclear medicine or the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) for nuclear medicine technology or the American Society of Clinical Pathologists (NM) (ASCP) may operate a fusion imaging device or a dual imaging device that uses radioactive material as a point source in transmission scanning and attenuation correction.

 

(b) A nuclear medicine technologist in paragraph (a) may only operate a stand-alone computed tomography x‑ray system if the technologist has passed the Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board for computed tomography (CT) or is credentialed in computed tomography (CT) from the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT).

 

(c) A nuclear medicine technologist who meets the requirements under paragraph (a) and who is participating in a training or educational program to obtain a credential under paragraph (b) is exempt from the examination requirement within the scope and for the duration of the training or educational program.

 

Sec. 9.  Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 144.121, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

 

Subd. 5e.  Radiation therapy technologist practice.  (a) A radiation therapy technologist who has passed the primary pathway credential in radiation therapy may operate radiation therapy accelerator and simulator x-ray systems.

 

(b) A radiation therapy technologist in paragraph (a) may only operate a stand-alone computed tomography x‑ray system if the technologist has passed and is credentialed in computed tomography (CT) from the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT).


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(c) A radiation therapy technologist who meets the requirements under paragraph (a) and who is participating in a training or educational program to obtain a credential under paragraph (b) is exempt from the examination requirement within the scope and for the duration of the training or educational program.

 

Sec. 10.  Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 144.292, subdivision 2, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 2.  Patient access.  Upon request, a provider shall supply to a patient within 30 calendar days of receiving a written request for medical records complete and current information possessed by that provider concerning any diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of the patient in terms and language the patient can reasonably be expected to understand.

 

Sec. 11.  Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 144.292, subdivision 5, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 5.  Copies of health records to patients.  Except as provided in section 144.296, upon a patient's written request, a provider, at a reasonable cost to the patient, shall promptly furnish to the patient within 30 calendar days of receiving a written request for medical records:

 

(1) copies of the patient's health record, including but not limited to laboratory reports, x-rays, prescriptions, and other technical information used in assessing the patient's health conditions; or

 

(2) the pertinent portion of the record relating to a condition specified by the patient.

 

With the consent of the patient, the provider may instead furnish only a summary of the record.  The provider may exclude from the health record written speculations about the patient's health condition, except that all information necessary for the patient's informed consent must be provided.

 

Sec. 12.  Minnesota Statutes 2019 Supplement, section 152.29, subdivision 1, is amended to read:

 

Subdivision 1.  Manufacturer; requirements.  (a) A manufacturer shall may operate eight distribution facilities, which may include the manufacturer's single location for cultivation, harvesting, manufacturing, packaging, and processing but is not required to include that location.  The commissioner shall designate the geographical service areas to be served by each manufacturer based on geographical need throughout the state to improve patient access.  A manufacturer shall not have more than two distribution facilities in each geographical service area assigned to the manufacturer by the commissioner.  A manufacturer shall operate only one location where all cultivation, harvesting, manufacturing, packaging, and processing of medical cannabis shall be conducted.  This location may be one of the manufacturer's distribution facility sites.  The additional distribution facilities may dispense medical cannabis and medical cannabis products but may not contain any medical cannabis in a form other than those forms allowed under section 152.22, subdivision 6, and the manufacturer shall not conduct any cultivation, harvesting, manufacturing, packaging, or processing at the other distribution facility sites.  Any distribution facility operated by the manufacturer is subject to all of the requirements applying to the manufacturer under sections 152.22 to 152.37, including, but not limited to, security and distribution requirements.

 

(b) A manufacturer may acquire hemp grown in this state from a hemp grower.  A manufacturer may manufacture or process hemp into an allowable form of medical cannabis under section 152.22, subdivision 6.  Hemp acquired by a manufacturer under this paragraph is subject to the same quality control program, security and testing requirements, and other requirements that apply to medical cannabis under sections 152.22 to 152.37 and Minnesota Rules, chapter 4770.

 

(c) A medical cannabis manufacturer shall contract with a laboratory approved by the commissioner, subject to any additional requirements set by the commissioner, for purposes of testing medical cannabis manufactured or hemp acquired by the medical cannabis manufacturer as to content, contamination, and consistency to verify the medical cannabis meets the requirements of section 152.22, subdivision 6.  The cost of laboratory testing shall be paid by the manufacturer.


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(d) The operating documents of a manufacturer must include:

 

(1) procedures for the oversight of the manufacturer and procedures to ensure accurate record keeping;

 

(2) procedures for the implementation of appropriate security measures to deter and prevent the theft of medical cannabis and unauthorized entrance into areas containing medical cannabis; and

 

(3) procedures for the delivery and transportation of hemp between hemp growers and manufacturers.

 

(e) A manufacturer shall implement security requirements, including requirements for the delivery and transportation of hemp, protection of each location by a fully operational security alarm system, facility access controls, perimeter intrusion detection systems, and a personnel identification system.

 

(f) A manufacturer shall not share office space with, refer patients to a health care practitioner, or have any financial relationship with a health care practitioner.

 

(g) A manufacturer shall not permit any person to consume medical cannabis on the property of the manufacturer.

 

(h) A manufacturer is subject to reasonable inspection by the commissioner.

 

(i) For purposes of sections 152.22 to 152.37, a medical cannabis manufacturer is not subject to the Board of Pharmacy licensure or regulatory requirements under chapter 151.

 

(j) A medical cannabis manufacturer may not employ any person who is under 21 years of age or who has been convicted of a disqualifying felony offense.  An employee of a medical cannabis manufacturer must submit a completed criminal history records check consent form, a full set of classifiable fingerprints, and the required fees for submission to the Bureau of Criminal Apprehension before an employee may begin working with the manufacturer.  The bureau must conduct a Minnesota criminal history records check and the superintendent is authorized to exchange the fingerprints with the Federal Bureau of Investigation to obtain the applicant's national criminal history record information.  The bureau shall return the results of the Minnesota and federal criminal history records checks to the commissioner.

 

(k) A manufacturer may not operate in any location, whether for distribution or cultivation, harvesting, manufacturing, packaging, or processing, within 1,000 feet of a public or private school existing before the date of the manufacturer's registration with the commissioner.

 

(l) A manufacturer shall comply with reasonable restrictions set by the commissioner relating to signage, marketing, display, and advertising of medical cannabis.

 

(m) Before a manufacturer acquires hemp from a hemp grower, the manufacturer must verify that the hemp grower has a valid license issued by the commissioner of agriculture under chapter 18K.

 

(n) Until a state-centralized, seed-to-sale system is implemented that can track a specific medical cannabis plant from cultivation through testing and point of sale, the commissioner shall conduct at least one unannounced inspection per year of each manufacturer that includes inspection of:

 

(1) business operations;

 

(2) physical locations of the manufacturer's manufacturing facility and distribution facilities;

 

(3) financial information and inventory documentation, including laboratory testing results; and

 

(4) physical and electronic security alarm systems.


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Sec. 13.  Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 152.35, is amended to read:

 

152.35 FEES; DEPOSIT OF REVENUE.

 

(a) The commissioner shall collect an enrollment fee of $200 from patients enrolled under this section.  If the patient attests to provides evidence of receiving Social Security disability insurance (SSDI), Supplemental Security Insurance Income (SSI), veterans disability, or railroad disability payments, or being enrolled in medical assistance or MinnesotaCare, then the fee shall be $50.  For purposes of this section:

 

(1) a patient is considered to receive SSDI if the patient was receiving SSDI at the time the patient was transitioned to retirement benefits by the United States Social Security Administration; and

 

(2) veterans disability payments include VA dependency and indemnity compensation.

 

Unless a patient provides evidence of receiving payments from or participating in one of the programs specifically listed in this paragraph, the commissioner of health must collect the $200 enrollment fee from a patient to enroll the patient in the registry program.  The fees shall be payable annually and are due on the anniversary date of the patient's enrollment.  The fee amount shall be deposited in the state treasury and credited to the state government special revenue fund.

 

(b) The commissioner shall collect an application fee of $20,000 from each entity submitting an application for registration as a medical cannabis manufacturer.  Revenue from the fee shall be deposited in the state treasury and credited to the state government special revenue fund.

 

(c) The commissioner shall establish and collect an annual fee from a medical cannabis manufacturer equal to the cost of regulating and inspecting the manufacturer in that year.  Revenue from the fee amount shall be deposited in the state treasury and credited to the state government special revenue fund.

 

(d) A medical cannabis manufacturer may charge patients enrolled in the registry program a reasonable fee for costs associated with the operations of the manufacturer.  The manufacturer may establish a sliding scale of patient fees based upon a patient's household income and may accept private donations to reduce patient fees.

 

Sec. 14.  Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 446A.081, subdivision 9, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 9.  Other uses of fund.  (a) The drinking water revolving loan fund may be used as provided in the act, including the following uses:

 

(1) to buy or refinance the debt obligations, at or below market rates, of public water systems for drinking water systems, where the debt was incurred after the date of enactment of the act, for the purposes of construction of the necessary improvements to comply with the national primary drinking water regulations under the federal Safe Drinking Water Act;

 

(2) to purchase or guarantee insurance for local obligations to improve credit market access or reduce interest rates;

 

(3) to provide a source of revenue or security for the payment of principal and interest on revenue or general obligation bonds issued by the authority if the bond proceeds are deposited in the fund;

 

(4) to provide loans or loan guarantees for similar revolving funds established by a governmental unit or state agency;

 

(5) to earn interest on fund accounts;


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(6) to pay the reasonable costs incurred by the authority, the Department of Employment and Economic Development, and the Department of Health for conducting activities as authorized and required under the act up to the limits authorized under the act;

 

(7) to develop and administer programs for water system supervision, source water protection, and related programs required under the act;

 

(8) notwithstanding Minnesota Rules, part 7380.0280, to provide principal forgiveness or grants to the extent permitted under the federal Safe Drinking Water Act and other federal law, based on the criteria and requirements established for drinking water projects under the water infrastructure funding program under section 446A.072;

 

(9) to provide loans, principal forgiveness or grants to the extent permitted under the federal Safe Drinking Water Act and other federal law to address green infrastructure, water or energy efficiency improvements, or other environmentally innovative activities; and

 

(10) to provide principal forgiveness, or grants for 50 80 percent of the project cost costs up to a maximum of $10,000 $100,000 for projects needed to comply with national primary drinking water standards for an existing nonmunicipal community or noncommunity public water system.; and

 

(11) to provide principal forgiveness or grants to the extent permitted under the federal Safe Drinking Water Act and other federal laws for 50 percent of the project costs up to a maximum of $250,000 for projects to replace the privately owned portion of drinking water lead service lines.

 

(b) Principal forgiveness or grants provided under paragraph (a), clause (9), may not exceed 25 percent of the eligible project costs as determined by the Department of Health for project components directly related to green infrastructure, water or energy efficiency improvements, or other environmentally innovative activities, up to a maximum of $1,000,000.

 

Sec. 15.  Laws 2019, First Special Session chapter 9, article 11, section 35, the effective date, is amended to read:

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective August 1, 2020 January 1, 2021.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective the day following final enactment.

 

Sec. 16.  AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION; QUALIFYING MEDICAL CONDITION.

 

(a) In accordance with Minnesota Statutes, section 152.27, subdivision 2, paragraph (b), the commissioner of health notified the legislature that the commissioner intends to add age-related macular degeneration as a qualifying medical condition to the medical cannabis program under Minnesota Statutes, section 152.22, subdivision 14.

 

(b) Minnesota Statutes, section 152.  27, subdivision 2, paragraph (b), specifies that the proposed qualifying medical condition is added effective August 1 unless the legislature by law provides otherwise.

 

(c) The legislature hereby states that age-related macular degeneration shall not be added as a qualifying medical condition under Minnesota Statutes, section 152.22, subdivision 14.

 

EFFECTIVE DATE.  This section is effective the day following final enactment.

 

Sec. 17.  REPEALER.

 

(a) Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 144.121, subdivisions 3 and 5b, are repealed.

 

(b) Minnesota Rules, part 7380.0280, is repealed.


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ARTICLE 2

HEALTH-RELATED LICENSING BOARDS

 

Section 1.  Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 62A.307, subdivision 2, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 2.  Requirement.  Coverage described in subdivision 1 that covers prescription drugs must provide the same coverage for a prescription written by a health care provider authorized to prescribe the particular drug covered by the health coverage described in subdivision 1, regardless of the type of health care provider that wrote the prescription.  This section is intended to prohibit denial of coverage based on the prescription having been written by an advanced practice nurse under section 148.235, a physician assistant under section 147A.18 147A.185, or any other nonphysician health care provider authorized to prescribe the particular drug.

 

Sec. 2.  [62Q.529] COVERAGE FOR DRUGS PRESCRIBED AND DISPENSED BY PHARMACIES.

 

(a) A health plan that provides prescription coverage must provide coverage for self-administered hormonal contraceptives, nicotine replacement medications, and opiate antagonists for the treatment of an acute opiate overdose prescribed and dispensed by a licensed pharmacist in accordance with section 151.37, subdivision 14, 15, or 16, under the same terms of coverage that would apply had the prescription drug been prescribed by a licensed physician, physician assistant, or advanced practice nurse practitioner. 

 

(b) A health plan is not required to cover the drug if dispensed by an out-of-network pharmacy, unless the health plan covers prescription drugs dispensed by out-of-network pharmacies.

 

Sec. 3.  Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 147A.01, subdivision 3, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 3.  Administer.  "Administer" means the delivery by a physician assistant authorized to prescribe legend drugs, a single dose of a legend drug, including controlled substances, to a patient by injection, inhalation, ingestion, or by any other immediate means, and the delivery by a physician assistant ordered by a physician a single dose of a legend drug by injection, inhalation, ingestion, or by any other immediate means.

 

Sec. 4.  Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 147A.01, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

 

Subd. 6a.  Collaborating physician.  "Collaborating physician" means a Minnesota licensed physician who oversees the performance, practice, and activities of a physician assistant under a collaborative agreement as described in section 147A.02, paragraph (c).

 

Sec. 5.  Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 147A.01, subdivision 21, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 21.  Prescription.  "Prescription" means a signed written order, an oral order reduced to writing, or an electronic order meeting current and prevailing standards given by a physician assistant authorized to prescribe drugs for patients in the course of the physician assistant's practice, and issued for an individual patient and containing the information required in the physician-physician assistant delegation agreement.

 

Sec. 6.  Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 147A.01, subdivision 26, is amended to read:

 

Subd. 26.  Therapeutic order.  "Therapeutic order" means an a written or verbal order given to another for the purpose of treating or curing a patient in the course of a physician assistant's practice.  Therapeutic orders may be written or verbal, but do not include the prescribing of legend drugs or medical devices unless prescribing authority has been delegated within the physician-physician assistant delegation agreement.

 

Sec. 7.  Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 147A.01, subdivision 27, is amended to read:


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Subd. 27.  Verbal order.  "Verbal order" means an oral order given to another for the purpose of treating or curing a patient in the course of a physician assistant's practice.  Verbal orders do not include the prescribing of legend drugs unless prescribing authority has been delegated within the physician-physician assistant delegation agreement.

 

Sec. 8.  Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 147A.02, is amended to read:

 

147A.02 QUALIFICATIONS FOR LICENSURE.

 

Except as otherwise provided in this chapter, an individual shall be licensed by the board before the individual may practice as a physician assistant.

 

(a) The board may grant a license as a physician assistant to an applicant who:

 

(1) submits an application on forms approved by the board;

 

(2) pays the appropriate fee as determined by the board;

 

(3) has current certification from the National Commission on Certification of Physician Assistants, or its successor agency as approved by the board;

 

(4) certifies that the applicant is mentally and physically able to engage safely in practice as a physician assistant;

 

(5) has no licensure, certification, or registration as a physician assistant under current discipline, revocation, suspension, or probation for cause resulting from the applicant's practice as a physician assistant, unless the board considers the condition and agrees to licensure;

 

(6) submits any other information the board deems necessary to evaluate the applicant's qualifications; and

 

(7) has been approved by the board.

 

(b) All persons registered as physician assistants as of June 30, 1995, are eligible for continuing license renewal.  All persons applying for licensure after that date shall be licensed according to this chapter.

 

(c) A physician assistant who qualifies for licensure must practice for at least 2,080 hours, within the context of a collaborative agreement, within a hospital or integrated clinical setting where physician assistants and physicians work together to provide patient care.  The physician assistant shall submit written evidence to the board with the application, or upon completion of the required collaborative practice experience.  For purposes of this paragraph, a collaborative agreement is a mutually agreed upon plan for the overall working relationship and collaborative arrangement between a physician assistant, and one or more physicians licensed under chapter 147, that designates the scope of services that can be provided to manage the care of patients.  The physician assistant and one of the collaborative physicians must have experience in providing care to patients with the same or similar medical conditions.  The collaborating physician is not required to be physically present so long as the collaborating physician and physician assistant are or can be easily in contact with each other by radio, telephone, or other telecommunication device.

 

Sec. 9.  Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 147A.03, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

 

Subd. 1a.  Licensure required.  Except as provided under subdivision 2, it is unlawful for any person to practice as a physician assistant without being issued a valid license according to this chapter.


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Sec. 10.  Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 147A.05, is amended to read:

 

147A.05 INACTIVE LICENSE.

 

(a) Physician assistants who notify the board in writing may elect to place their license on an inactive status.  Physician assistants with an inactive license shall be excused from payment of renewal fees and shall not practice as physician assistants.  Persons who engage in practice while their license is lapsed or on inactive status shall be considered to be practicing without a license, which shall be grounds for discipline under section 147A.13.  Physician assistants who provide care under the provisions of section 147A.23 shall not be considered practicing without a license or subject to disciplinary action.  Physician assistants who notify the board of their intent to resume active practice shall be required to pay the current renewal fees and all unpaid back fees and shall be required to meet the criteria for renewal specified in section 147A.07.

 

(b) Notwithstanding section 147A.03, subdivision 1, a person with an inactive license may continue to use the protected titles specified in section 147A.03, subdivision 1, so long as the person does not practice as a physician assistant.

 

Sec. 11.  Minnesota Statutes 2019 Supplement, section 147A.06, is amended to read:

 

147A.06 CANCELLATION OF LICENSE FOR NONRENEWAL.

 

Subdivision 1.  Cancellation of license.  The board shall not renew, reissue, reinstate, or restore a license that has lapsed on or after July 1, 1996, and has not been renewed within two annual renewal cycles starting July 1, 1997.  A licensee whose license is canceled for nonrenewal must obtain a new license by applying for licensure and fulfilling all requirements then in existence for an initial license to practice as a physician assistant.

 

Subd. 2.  Licensure following lapse of licensed status; transition.  (a) A licensee whose license has lapsed under subdivision 1 before January 1, 2020, and who seeks to regain licensed status after January 1, 2020, shall be treated as a first-time licensee only for purposes of establishing a license renewal schedule, and shall not be subject to the license cycle conversion provisions in section 147A.29.

 

(b) This subdivision expires July 1, 2022.

 

Sec. 12.  Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 147A.09, is amended to read:

 

147A.09 SCOPE OF PRACTICE, DELEGATION.

 

Subdivision 1.  Scope of practice.  Physician assistants shall practice medicine only with physician supervision.  Physician assistants may perform those duties and responsibilities as delegated in the physician-physician assistant delegation agreement and delegation forms maintained at the address of record by the supervising physician and physician assistant, including the prescribing, administering, and dispensing of drugs, controlled substances, and medical devices, excluding anesthetics, other than local anesthetics, injected in connection with an operating room procedure, inhaled anesthesia and spinal anesthesia under an established practice agreement.

 

Patient service must be limited to A physician assistant's scope of practice includes:

 

(1) services within the training and experience of the physician assistant;

 

(2) patient services customary to the practice of the supervising physician or alternate supervisi